Now showing items 21-40 of 6767

    • The Liminal: a novel-in-progress

      Siegel, Moshe (2021-12)
      THE LIMINAL is an early draft excerpt of an interstitial fiction novel-in-progress.
    • Encouraging Guardian Involvement Among ELLs

      Wade, Carol; Bush, Megan (SUNY Brockport, Department of Education and Human Development, 2021-08-14)
      Guardian involvement is important in student’s academic achievements however that involvement is not consistent across populations. Therefore, this capstone aims to examine the overarching research question: How can teachers foster positive relationships with students that promote parent involvement in the ENL classroom? To answer this question, it is important that teachers and school administration know the struggles families face. Some of these struggles may include language and cultural barriers, education levels of guardians, and the family’s socioeconomic status. The professional development for middle school teachers and school staff will provide strategies and programs that will help increase guardian involvement. As a result of this professional development teachers will have strategies they can implement into their classrooms and in school to increase academic involvement with ELL families. In the future it is important that researchers continue to study the effects that programs such as community programs have on guardian involvement a how it impacts student academics.
    • A Study on Wide-ranging Ethical Implications of Big Data Technology in a Digital Society: How Likely Are Data Accidents during COVID-19?

      Lokshina, Izabella V.; Lanting, Cees J. M. (IGI Global, 2021)
      Exponential growth in the commercial use of the internet has dramatically increased the volume and scope of data gathered and analyzed by datacentric business organizations. Big Data emerged as a term to summarize both the technical and commercial aspects of these growing data collection and analysis processes. Formerly, much discussion of Big Data was focused on its transformational potential for technological innovation and efficiency; however, less attention was given to its ethical implications beyond the generation of commercial value. In this paper, the authors investigate the wide-ranging ethical implications of Big Data technology in a digital society. They inform that strategies behind Big Data technology require organizational systems, or business ecosystems, that also leave them vulnerable to accidents associated with its commercial value and known as data accidents. These data accidents have distinct features and raise important concerns, including data privacy during COVID-19. The authors suggest successful risk mitigation strategies.
    • Gendered Lives

      Fernandez, Nadine; Nelson, Katie (SUNY Press, 2022-01-01)
      Gendered Lives takes a regional approach to examine gender issues from an anthropological perspective with a focus on globalization and intersectionality. Chapters present contributors' ethnographic research, contextualizing their findings within four geographic regions: Latin America, the Caribbean, South Asia, and the Global North. Each regional section begins with an overview of the broader historical, social, and gendered contexts, which situate the regions within larger global linkages. These introductions also feature short project/people profiles that highlight the work of community leaders or non-governmental organizations active in gender-related issues. Each research-based chapter begins with a chapter overview and learning objectives and closes with discussion questions and resources for further exploration. This modular, regional approach allows instructors to select the regions and cases they want to use in their courses. While they can be used separately, the chapters are connected through the book's central themes of globalization and intersectionality. An OER version of this course if freely available thanks to the generous support of SUNY OER Services. Access the book online at https://milnepublishing.geneseo.edu/genderedlives/.
    • Superhero adventures and the representation of science: A historical look at film adaptations of The Incredible Hulk during the 1970s and 2000s

      Silva Filho, Fernando Alves da; Massarani, Luisa; Stengler, A. Erik (SciELO – Scientific Electronic Library Online, 2021-12)
      Film productions offer different representations of science and scientists. This study investigates how science and scientists are represented in superhero adventure narratives, particularly in The Incredible Hulk films. Four films were analyzed: two from the 1970s, when the first movies portraying this superhero were released, and two from the early twenty-first century as the Marvel Cinematic Universe expanded and superhero movies were frequent blockbusters. The specific goal was to examine how representations of science and scientists in the Hulk films have changed over time.
    • Organisational forms of science communication: the UK and Spanish European higher education systems as paradigms

      Ojeda-Romano, Gabriela; Fernández-Marcial, Viviana; Wilkinson, Clare; Stengler, A. Erik (Springer, 2021-12)
      As key elements in research and development systems, higher education institutions have been taking a leading role when it comes to communicating science and technology, but their performance has been inconsistent so far. In this critical and comparative study of the UK public engagement model and the Spanish scientific culture model, eighteen practitioners from higher education institutions across both regions were interviewed. A mixed qualitative data analysis has been performed identifying similarities and differences that unravelled the science communication management model in the two different higher education systems. This article provides evidence on how the institutionalisation of science communication is strongly influenced by key driving forces in the higher education context as well as the policies of administrations and other agents.
    • Presentation of Decadent Orientalisms: The Decay of Colonial Modernity

      Fieni, David (2121-10)
      Dr. Fieni will present selections from his book, Decadent Orientalisms: The Decay of Colonial Modernity, which explores how literature in French and Arabic has imagined the relative health and morbidity of France and the Arab World since the mid-19th century. Attentive to historical and literary configurations of language, race, religion, and power, Decadent Orientalisms shows the importance of understanding Western discourses of Eastern decline together with Arab and Islamic responses in which decadence returns as a characteristic of the West. The lecture will range from a discussion of a scandalously carnivalesque Arabic text from 1855 by the Lebanese author Faris Ahmed al-Shidyaq to contemporary writing in French by Arab immigrants in Paris exorcising the specters of their own supposedly “degenerate” status.
    • For weightlessness: a portfolio

      Apuzzo, Alexandra (2021-12)
      Tell me how it feels to be light and have so much time. I know only heaviness. I know only not enough. Not enough time and too few words. I am being crushed. I am being That was what I found in my mother’s notebook after her suicide. I won’t call it a letter – it wasn’t addressed to anyone; it wasn’t signed. She didn’t even finish it. But still I ripped the page out and kept it. It’s in my desk drawer and before I go to bed, I read it; try to read between the lines, to understand. But I can’t even imagine her saying the words. Tell me how it feels to be light.
    • Becoming “spiritual but not religious”: narratives on family of origin, conversion, and commitment

      Marks, Kaelyn Marie (2021-12)
      This qualitative narrative study explored how individuals raised within organized religion(s) came to associate with the orientation of “Spiritual but Not Religious” (i.e., SBNR). Ten semi-structured interviews delved into topics such as family upbringing, religious environment, spiritual development, cognitive dissonance, and resolutions. Notable parental relationship qualities within categories of being positive, distant, strict, and/or abusive emerged. Parental conflict with at least one parent was a shared experience across the sample. It was more common for conflict with fathers to exist as previous literature has suggested. Compared to those raised in more severely religious environments, those raised within less religious environments were more prone to feeling confident and committed with their present spiritual beliefs. This work contributes to further understanding the various developmental pathways and influences on spirtual identity exploration and commitment. Further considerations and implications of the study are discussed.
    • Studio: the immersion: MFA Thesis - Ceramics

      Yang, Hee Joo (2021-12)
      I am examining ways of understanding myself through objects by focusing on giving form to invisible embodiments of states like emotions, memories, and experiences. This allows me to explore the circumstances surrounding me and ask: Where do I get inspiration from? What do I hear and feel? How do I process the memories of everything I have been through? Exploring these unshaped things in my studio work allows me to give form to my accumulated experience over time. This work synthesizes and catalogs my relationship with myself through the objectification of invisible things.
    • Feasibility of solar panel production using renewables

      Mazzurco, Anthony (2021-12)
      The purpose of this paper is to cover a range of topics related to the current energy issue that we have at hand. It will cover the foundation of our main energy sources, if we have reached peak oil, energy economics in relation to renewable energy, the rate of consumption of energy, other bi-products of oil that we use in everyday life, and the feasibility of producing solar panels from a completely renewable energy power plant. When most people think of oil, they do not consider that it is our main source of energy that drives society. There are other energy sources that we use that include coal, other forms of oil like substances such as biodiesel, ethanol corn, and renewable energy. In the past twenty years, the growth in solar and wind technologies has grown rapidly. In order to use less fossil fuels, there has also been an increase in electric vehicles. The movement towards solar, wind, and electric vehicles may sound like a viable solution, but the embodied energy in these technologies is not emphasized enough on the engineering side. In energy economics there is a term called Energy Returned On Energy Invested (EROEI, or EROI). This field of economics focuses on the amount of energy it takes to produce an energy source, and what that energy output is in relation to production. While looking into the EROEI for the more popular energy alternatives, it can be seen that solar and wind have various values of return. EROI should also be considered with electric vehicles, but there are many other variables to be considered. We are now realizing that peak oil production will be an issue, so alternative energy and transportation technologies are being focused on. One of the issues is if we use certain types of elements for these fossil fuel alternatives, we will eventually exhaust those resources as well. That being said, we should reconsider better alternatives, and reduce wasteful resource industries.
    • Caring for the Social and Emotional Well- Being of ELLs

      Algier, Jaclyn Jenna (SUNY Brockport, 2021-07-30)
      This capstone project aims to explore the relationship between the social-emotional well-being and academic success of English Language Learners (ELLs). It also aims to support teachers, faculty, and administrative staff who work with ELLs. In many U.S. school districts, including Wheatland-Chili Central School District, the lack of progression in meeting the social and emotional learning (SEL) needs of ELLs and developing healthy feelings of self-efficacy has impacted the academic success of ELLs. It has also led to isolation, student withdrawal, and poor teacher-student relationships. To increase social and emotional support for ELLs and non ELLs, multiple components of the school climate and teachers’ pedagogy have been considered to provide positive reinforcement in these areas at the middle and high school level within Wheatland-Chili Central School District. Solutions to the problem include implementations of SEL strategies and tools, emotional tracker, lesson plan template with SEL focus, and monthly in-house faculty professional development meetings. Recommendations include educating and incorporating SEL strategies into teaching pedagogies of mainstream and ELL teachers. Furthermore, newly implemented SEL strategies should be reviewed and revised to support teachers and ELLs with any necessary revisions for greater improvement.
    • Charting Neurotypical Change in Complement and Cytokine Levels Across Postnatal Human Cortical Development

      Sager, Rachel (2021-12)
      A burgeoning body of evidence supports a role for immune signals in neurotypical human brain development. Furthermore, associations between neuroinflammation in development and the subsequent increased risk for psychiatric disorders indicate that an excess of immune signaling early in life damages brain function later in life. In this dissertation, I examined the postnatal expression of two major immune signaling families: complement and cytokines; and the relative contributions of neural cell types to the cortical transcriptome. I used high-throughput microarray, quantitative reverse transcription PCR, immunohistochemistry and multiplex immunoassays. I found coordinated increases in glial cell marker, complement, and cytokine transcripts from birth until the typical age of entry into school (age 5). There were two main patterns of change in gene expression encoding immune signals and their receptors: an early postnatal peak in toddlers followed by a decline in expression levels (C1Q, C3, IL-1β, CD11B, IL-1R1, IL-18) and an early postnatal increase in toddlers, followed by additional increases in adolescents and young adults (IL-6, TNF-α). Complement inhibitor mRNAs were also differentially expressed across postnatal human life, increasing before reaching a plateau around school age (CD46, CD55, CR1,) or peaking in young adulthood (SERPING1, CD59). This suggests sustained complement inhibition during adolescence. The multiple cytokine and complement family members that peaked in toddlers suggest a period of dominant immune signaling from age two to five in humans. This may be related to the proliferation or maturation of glia during early postnatal development, whereas the cytokines seen increasing in adolescents and young adults are contemporaneous with periods of proposed increases in synaptic elimination. These findings open up additional avenues of investigation into the role of immune signaling in normal mammalian brain development and support that time periods of normative increases in developmental immune factor signaling overlap with known 'windows of vulnerability' to manifesting autism and schizophrenia.
    • The Role of Laminins in the Retinal Vascular Basement Membrane

      Brunken, William J.; Watters, Jared (2021-11)
      The vascular basement membrane (vBM) of the central nervous system (CNS) is a highly specialized structure that is composed of various extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and has many functions, including providing a point of adhesion for the cells of the vasculature, serving as a physical barrier, and providing an interface for communication with endothelial cells. One family of ECM molecules, laminins, are responsible for many of these specialized functions. There are 16 known isoforms of laminin, each consisting of a single α, β, and γ-chain. The distribution of these isoforms in the CNS vBM, however, remains unknown. Here, we used the retina to examine the distribution of laminin chains in the CNS vBM throughout development, as well as the roles of β2-containing laminins in vBM organization and γ3-containing laminins in arterial morphogenesis. The results presented in Chapter 2 demonstrate that there are dramatic changes in the temporal and spatial patterning of many of the laminin chains in the retinal vasculature throughout development, particularly the α2, α5, and γ3-chains. We deleted a key component of the CNS vBM, the laminin β2-chain, to gain a deeper understanding of how laminins affect vBM structure. Deletion of the β2-chain leads to decreased expression of several partner chains, including α2, α5, and γ3. Interestingly, the deletion of laminin β2 also leads to increased deposition of two other ECM molecules, agrin and perlecan, in the BMs of retinal veins and arteries, respectively. We also provide strong evidence that astrocytes contribute laminin 221 to the retinal vBM and that this laminin may directly regulate AQP4 expression in vascular associated astrocytic endfeet. The results presented in Chapter 3 demonstrate that laminins are involved in regulating arterial morphogenesis. Specifically, we found that γ3-containing laminins signal through dystroglycan to induce Dll4-Notch signaling, leading to decreased vascular branching and increased smooth muscle coverage: hallmarks of the arterial phenotype. Taken together, the work presented here further elucidates the structural and functional roles for laminins in the CNS vBM.
    • ANALYSIS OF VACUOLAR TYPE - H+ - ATPASE FUNCTION IN NEUROMAST HAIR CELLS IN THE ZEBRAFISH EMBRYO

      Amack, Jeffrey, D.; Santra, Peu (2021-11)
      Vacuolar type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) is a ubiquitously expressed enzyme complex that pumps protons across membranes. The proton-motive force generated by V-ATPase is used by cells to acidify intracellular compartments. Additionally, certain specialized tissue types have V-ATPase on plasma membranes where it secretes H+into the extracellular space. While V-ATPase activity is essential for several cellular functions, our understanding of cell-type specific functions for V-ATPase remains limited. Here, I focused on investigating V-ATPase functions in mechanosensory hair cells. Hair cells are functional units of mammalian auditory and vestibular systems. Consequently, hair cell loss leads to permanent deafness. Mutation in specific V-ATPase subunits causes sensorineural deafness in human, however, the mechanism is not well understood. I used zebrafish as model vertebrate to investigate how loss of V-ATPase function impacts hair cells. Using a combination of genetic mutations, pharmacological manipulations and live imaging of hair cells in vivo, I found that V-ATPase activity is critical for hair cell survival. Analysis of molecular markers and cellular morphologies indicates hair cells in V-ATPase mutants undergo a caspase-independent, necrosis-like death. V-ATPase mutant hair cells show a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (mPTP). On modulating mPTP pharmacologically, V-ATPase mutants show a modest but consistent improvement of hair cell survival. These results indicate mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to hair cell death in V-ATPase mutants. Next, I generated a novel cilia pH biosensor and found that hair cell kinocilia have a more basic pH than other primary cilia in zebrafish embryos. Interestingly, my collaborators and I discovered that V-ATPase subunits localize to hair cell kinocilia in zebrafish and mice, which suggests cell-type specific functions for V-ATPase in kinocilia. pH maintenance in kinocilia may be an essential function that contributes to proper kinocilia length and/or function. In conclusion, this work has uncovered a function for V-ATPase activity that is critical for hair cell survival, in part by maintaining mitochondrial health, and a function that mediates hair cell kinocilia form and function. The work presented in this thesis advances our understanding of V-ATPase functioning in hearing loss, more broadly elucidates new in vivo cell-type specific V-ATPase functions.
    • Black Campus Life

      Tichavakunda, Antar (SUNY Press, 2021-12-01)
      An in-depth ethnography of Black engineering students at a historically White institution, Black Campus Life examines the intersection of two crises, up close: the limited number of college graduates in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, and the state of race relations in higher education. Antar Tichavakunda takes readers across campus, from study groups to parties and beyond as these students work hard, have fun, skip class, fundraise, and, at times, find themselves in tense racialized encounters. By consistently centering their perspectives and demonstrating how different campus communities, or social worlds, shape their experiences, Tichavakunda challenges assumptions about not only Black STEM majors but also Black students and the “racial climate” on college campuses more generally. Most fundamentally, Black Campus Life argues that Black collegians are more than the racism they endure. By studying and appreciating the everyday richness and complexity of their experiences, we all—faculty, administrators, parents, policymakers, and the broader public—might learn how to better support them.
    • Virtual Connectedness: Working Together to Create a Companion Site for Spanish Phonetics & Phonology

      Escudero, Alejandra; Carbone, Alyssa; Barreca, Nicole (2021)
      The creation of a resource for students who are struggling or who simply want to practice their skills, that is accessible to all, is crucial, especially during the current times of virtual learning. We have created a companion site for the Spanish Phonetics & Phonology course for all SUNY students to use, as there is no resource of its kind, that is in the target language (Spanish) and is free of cost for all students and faculty. This will be a long-lasting tool that will allow for clarification of concepts, practice with engaging virtual exercises, and many opportunities to exercise skills and learning. After students learn concepts in class, they can access the companion site to further reinforce the comprehension of content, test what they know, see diagrams, practice, and get tips from other students who have already taken the course. We use h5p plugins in order to create different types of interactive activities for students in each module, which enhance the practice and learning experience. Each module in the site follows the same structure: 1) objectives of the module, 2) a short pre-reading quiz, 3) the content of the module, used to review concepts covered in class with examples and diagrams, 4) a “tips from other students” section so that students can learn from other students who already took the course and remember some tricks that will help them when preparing for exams, 5) a section for activities and practice, and 6) a summary of what was covered in the module. Two key resources that have been crucial to the creation of the companion site are Pressbooks and Monday.com. Pressbooks is the site used to create content and interactive activities. Monday.com is a site that allows for task management, progress tracking, making comments, and for student-faculty accountability. This companion site is an Open Educational Resource (OER) and is ADA-compliant, so that all students- regardless of income and potential disability- can access it for free. This resource also falls into the category of Open Pedagogy, with our companion site being one of the few Open Pedagogy projects across the SUNY system, where content is planned and created by students under faculty supervision.
    • Meta-Analysis of Alzheimer's Disease Risk with Obesity, Diabetes, and Related Disorders

      Profenno, Louis A.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Faraone, Stephen V. (Elsevier BV, 2010-03)
      Background: Late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a multifactorial and heterogeneous disorder with major risk factors including advanced age, presence of an apolipoprotein E 4 (APOE4) allele, and family history of AD. Other risk factors may be obesity and diabetes and related disorders, which are highly prevalent. Methods: We reviewed longitudinal epidemiological studies of body mass, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and glucose and insulin levels on risk for AD. We conducted meta-analyses of the results from these studies. Results: For obesity assessed by body mass index, the pooled effect size for AD was 1.59 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02–2.5; z 2.0; p .042), and for diabetes, the pooled effect size for AD was 1.54 (95% CI 1.33–1.79; z 5.7; p .001). Egger’s test did not find significant evidence for publication bias in the meta-analysis for obesity (t 1.4, p .21) or for diabetes (t .86, p .42). Since these disorders are highly comorbid, we conducted a meta-analysis combining all studies of obesity, diabetes, and abnormal glucose or insulin levels, which yielded a highly significant pooled effect size for AD of 1.63 (95% CI 1.39 –1.92; z 5.9; p .001). Conclusions: Obesity and diabetes significantly and independently increase risk for AD. Though the level of risk is less than that with the APOE4 allele, the high prevalence of these disorders may result in substantial increases in future incidence of AD. Physiological changes common to obesity and diabetes plausibly promote AD.
    • RASD2, MYH9, and CACNG2 Genes at Chromosome 22q12 Associated with the Subgroup of Schizophrenia with Non-Deficit in Sustained Attention and Executive Function

      Liu, Yu-Li; Fann, Cathy Shen-Jang; Liu, Chih-Min; Chen, Wei J.; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Chen, Chun-Houh; Jou, Yuh-Shan; Liu, Shi-Kai; Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; et al. (Elsevier BV, 2008-11)
      Background: In a previous linkage study of schizophrenia that included Taiwanese samples, the marker D22S278 (22q12.3) was significantly linked to schizophrenia (p .001). Methods: We conducted fine mapping of the implicated genomic region, with 47 validated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers around 1 Mb of D22S278, in a Taiwanese sample of 218 pedigrees with at least 2 siblings affected with schizophrenia. We examined the association of these SNPs and their haplotypes with schizophrenia and with subgroups defined by the presence and absence of deficits in sustained attention as assessed by undegraded and degraded continuous performance tests (CPTs). We also examined subgroups defined by deficits in categories achieved in the Wisconsin Card Sort Test (WCST). Results: Three of five candidate vulnerability genes (RASD2, APOL5, MYH9, EIF3S7, and CACNG2), which had marginally significant associations with schizophrenia, had significant associations with schizophrenic patients who did not have deficits in sustained attention on the undegraded CPT (RASD2 gene SNP rs736212; p .0008 with single locus analysis) and the degraded CPT (MYH9 gene haplotype 1-1-1-1 of SNP rs3752463 - rs1557540 - rs713839 - rs739097; p .0059 with haplotype analysis). We also found a significant association for patients who showed no deficits in executive function as measured by categories achieved in the WCST (CACNG2 gene haplotype 2-1-1-1 of SNP rs2267360 - rs140526 - rs1883987 - rs916269; p .0163 with haplotype analysis). Conclusions: The genes RASD2, MYH9, and CACNG2 might be vulnerability genes for neuropsychologically defined subgroups of schizophrenic patients.