Now showing items 21-40 of 7043

    • The Spectrum: a Scholars Day Journal Volume 7 (Spring 2021)

      Executive Editor, Mitchell Christensen; Managing Editor, Mary Jo Orzech (SUNY Brockport, 2021)
      Scholars Day at SUNY Brockport was held online for two years during the Covid pandemic (2020 and 2021). The online format was challenging for students as well as conference organizers. Courses were forced to pivot to online learning almost overnight. Masks, weekly Covid testing and 6’ social distancing were the norm for those on campus. The online version of Scholars Day included a mix of posters, videos and more. This 2021 special issue of The Spectrum includes a small sample of student posters published to recognize the quality and commitment to student scholarly and creative activity that continued throughout this period.
    • Evaluating the Performance of Caching Strategies in Diverse Information-centric Network Settings

      Forbes, Rhonda-Lee T.; Kulkami, Dr. Adita (SUNY Brockport, 2021-04)
    • Growth and Seed Formation of Brachypodium sylvaticum in Genesee County, NY

      Morin, Zachary; Graham, Andie (SUNY Brockport, 2021-04)
    • When We Speak Up: Factors That Predict Willingness to Confront Expressions of Racial Prejudice

      Testone, Julianna M.; Minster, Korrine I.; Andrus, Tyra; Stroman-Surita, Aaliyah; Ratcliff, Jennifer (SUNY Brockport, 2021-04)
    • Insight of the Deepwater Sculpin Reproduction in Lake Ontario

      Ludwig, Jarrod; Weidel, Brian; O'Malley, Brian; Connerton, Mike; Rinchard, Jacques (SUNY Brockport, 2021-04)
    • A Retrospective Chart Review to Determine the Prevalence of Malnutrition in the Elderly and the Effects of Nutrition Interventions

      Riddle, Emily; Isaacs, Cheyenne (2022)
      Background: The prevalence of malnutrition in elderly patients continues to increase with an aging population. Patients with malnutrition are at risk for longer hospital stays, increased risk of frailty, at higher risk for having a poor quality of health, poor health outcomes and increased mortality. Objectives: Evaluate the effectiveness of new nutritional interventions to help correct malnutrition diagnosis criteria. Setting: Presbyterian Home and Services an Acute Rehab and Long Term Care Nursing Facility Participants: 27 elderly patients initially met the malnutrition criteria, at the time of the interventions there were only 20 patients Study Design: Retrospective Study to evaluate the effectiveness of nutritional interventions. That data was utilized to help develop new nutritional interventions. Methods: The newly developed interventions were implemented and the data was collected over a 3 week span. data was collected on weight change, Pre and Post-BMI. The data was analyzed utilizing SPSS Software. Intervention: A high calorie diet was implemented for patients that met the criteria for malnutrition, patients with BMI of 23 were screened to prevent BMI <22, whole milk was programmed in house diet in place of 2% milk Results:100% of the patients had a beneficial wt gain of .10 to 1.25#. This was clinically relevant as evidenced by the score of the paired T-test. During the time frame of the interventions none of the patients had their malnutrition criteria diagnosis corrected. Conclusions: Early screening and implementing nutritional interventions can help prevent malnutrition. Once a patient is diagnosed with malnutrition it is difficult to correct.
    • Effectiveness of Education on Knowledge and Participation in Community Programs

      Riddle, Emily; Patricelli, Isabella; Griffin, Matthew; Corgel, Isabelle (2022)
      Introduction: A Quasi-experimental study was performed to determine if education in the form of handouts would increase participant use in the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP Ed) programs. Methods: Participants were recruited for this study the day of the intervention. The effectiveness of this study was based on changes in pre- and post- questionnaire responses. Participants completed a pre- questionnaire prior to the intervention, and a post questionnaire 3 weeks later. Results: There was a significant change in the number of participants who stated they received education/information on LIHEAP, and SNAP Ed (p = 0.023). All other results were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Further studies should be completed to evaluate the effectiveness of education on increasing knowledge, and participation in community programs. While this study provided insight to the benefit that education may have on community program participation, there was limited significance in results and further studies should be altered.
    • Storytelling

      Gasché, Rodolphe (SUNY Press, 2018-10-01)
      In Storytelling, Rodolphe Gasché reexamines the muteness of Holocaust survivors, that is, their inability to tell their stories. This phenomenon has not been explained up to now without reducing the violence of the events to which survivors were subjected, on the one hand, and diminishing the specific harm that has been done to them as human beings, on the other. Distinguishing storytelling from testifying and providing information, Gasché asserts that the utter senselessness of the violence inflicted upon them is what inhibited survivors from making sense of their experience in the form of tellable stories. In a series of readings of major theories of storytelling by three thinkers—Wilhelm Schapp, whose work will be a welcome discovery to many English-speaking audiences, Walter Benjamin, and Hannah Arendt—Gasché systematically assesses the consequences of the loss of the storytelling faculty, considered by some an inalienable possession of the human, both for the victims' humanity and for philosophy.
    • Adorned with rattles: meditations on indigenous sonorism, communal healing, and nature : MFA Thesis - Photography and Related Media

      Miranda-Rivadeneira, Koyoltzintli (2022-05)
      Grounded in Indigenous ontologies, Latinx anthropology and nepantla, I seek to understand the sonic and oral traditions that have populated the Americas for millennia as a way to repair, reclaim and reimagine temporalities of healing and to tell stories across time and space. I gaze at the night sky the way my ancestors did, to inquire about how to make sense of the world and ultimately connect with them and their stubborn capacity to survive within us. I re-construct pre-Columbian instruments that have been locked away in museums, reclaiming their sounds and sovereignty. Through this act, my body becomes a vessel for the most primal creative force. I perform so that we may reaffirm our connection to the earth. To adorn these instruments and to turn them into ceremonial objects, I use achiote, mango leaves, shells, tobacco string, and iridescent pigment that reminds me of the skies in the coast of Ecuador, the ancestral homelands of my ancestors who played these instruments. My work is the past and future conjugated in the present. By reclaiming we remember; by remembering we heal. I imagine how sounds and rituals can restore a subjective-geographic relation to living systems and engage with intersectional technologies that can dismantle imperialism and ecological degradation in order to tend to the earth and heal mutually.
    • The Impact of Culture Shock on ELLs

      Altalouli, Mahmoud; Altalouli, Mahmoud; Ciccotto, Dana (SUNY Brockport, Department of Education and Human Development, 2021-07)
      This capstone project aims to support teachers, administrators, school counselors and school psychologists who work with English Language Learners (ELLs). Although the ELL population continues to grow, staff members are not always informed on how to support ELLs. ELLs experience culture shock when entering a new country and new school setting. ELLs have emotional, social, and academic reactions to culture shock and thus, staff members must be knowledgeable on culture shock and the effects it has on ELLs. Solutions to mitigate the effects of culture shock include implementing Social Emotional Learning (SEL), supporting goal setting, building social-just education, building inclusion by respecting diverse cultures, and modifying tasks for ELLs, and implementing culturally responsive teaching. Recommendations include creating a safe space for ELLs, valuing ELLs’ native cultures and languages, using multicultural materials in the classroom, and encouraging ELLs to appreciate their differences. The professional development plan, Culture Shock Career Development, provides assistance and creates opportunities for teachers, administrators, school counselors and school psychologists to provide assistance and create opportunities for them to add additional suggestions to reduce the effects of culture shock.
    • Using Dynamic Graphing Software to Develop Conceptual Understanding of Transformations of Trigonometric Functions

      Mazurret-Boyle, Rosa; Loce, Matthew (SUNY Brockport, Department of Education and Human Development, 2021-08)
      Interactive mathematics software can be useful to develop student understanding of complex mathematical problem solving through manipulation and visualization of concepts. One challenging topic for high school mathematics students to understand is the relationship between right triangle trigonometry and trigonometric functions. Using Desmos, a dynamic and interactive mathematical graphing software, this project explores how to build student understanding of trigonometric functions through an exploration of right triangle trigonometry, the unit circle, and their relationship to parent trigonometric functions. This project also applies Desmos to explore unique mathematical representations that can support student understanding of relationships between right triangle trigonometry and transformations of trigonometric functions with a dynamic circle.
    • Effective Strategie for Teaching ELL Students at the Elementary Level

      Wade, Carol; Siegel, Alanna (SUNY Brockport, Department of Education and Human Development, 2021-08)
      The purpose of this capstone is to provide all teachers effective strategies that can be used with all students but specifically ELL students. The goal is to meet the needs of ELLs in mainstream classrooms through strategic strategies, modifications and accomodations. The literature review states that ELLs can improve academically, socially and emotionally when teachers are trained to develop lessons with ELLs in mindThe problem emerges when students are placed in classrooms with teachers who do not have a background or formal training on how to successfully teach and alter content. Additionally, without building in effective strategies, content will not be able to be delivered effectively and ELL students may fall behind.This capstone includes a Professional Development in order to offer practitioners a series of strategies and techniques to modify instruction and accommodate linguistic nees if ELLs in mainstream classrooms. The learning goals is (sic) for teachers to enter the classroom and deliver instruction with new skills sets of strategies, and resources they an use to advance the academic and social emotional needs of ELLs.
    • Mental Health-Focused Nutrition Education Intervention in Secondary School

      Riddle, Emily; Kelley, Lindsey G.; Parker, Jacqueline (2022)
      Many high schools in the US have insufficient nutrition education programs to inspire behavior change, resulting in a nutrition knowledge deficit in adolescents. School-based nutrition education programs typically do not cover the association between nutrition and mental health. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to evaluate the change in nutrition knowledge and behaviors of secondary school students following a nutrition education intervention. Students enrolled in their required health course received a two 80-minute session nutrition education intervention. Student nutrition knowledge and behavior changes were assessed in the intervention group (n=56) and a previous needs assessment control group (n=8) using a nutrition knowledge survey and food frequency questionnaire. Compared to the needs assessment group, the intervention group had improved nutrition knowledge test scores (28% vs. 68%, p=0.000). Nutrition knowledge test scores among the intervention group was correlated with confidence in reading food labels (r=.351, p<0.001) and choosing healthy foods (r=.453, p<0.001), but was not correlated with confidence in macronutrient (r=.183, p>0.05) or micronutrient knowledge (r=.167, p>0.05). The intervention group reported low intake of breakfast, vegetables, fruit, and simple carbohydrates. This study did support the effectiveness of inclusion of mental health in a nutrition education intervention to improve nutrition knowledge and behaviors.
    • Effectiveness of a Nutrition Intervention in Older Adults Aged 55+

      Riddle, Emily; Williams, Emily R.; McGee, Patty (2022)
      Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention designed to improve behaviors, knowledge, and self-efficacy around chronic disease management in older adults. Design: Quasi-experimental design with one intervention group of older adults Methods: Participants were recruited for this study via an email from facility director, Joan Scotti and other marketing tactics. Effectiveness of the study was evaluated based on changes in pre and post survey questionnaires Setting: Slingerlands, NY Participants: 18 participants completed the study Intervention: The intervention included two days of instruction. Topics discussed included adequate intake to combat malnutrition and easy ways to prepare nutritious foods. The second day included a cooking demonstration. The intervention was conducted over two days one week apart. Participants completed pre and post survey questionnaires which included questions related to general nutrition knowledge, confidence reading nutrition fact labels, and preparing fruits and vegetables to assess the effectiveness of the intervention Results: Quantitative data was analyzed using Mann-Whitney U tests in SPSS. Participant confidence in using and interpreting food labels, confidence including fruits and vegetables in meals and snacks, and familiarity with different methods of cooking fruits and vegetables significantly increased (p<0.05). Conclusions and Implications: A hands-on nutrition intervention and cooking demonstration can be effective at increasing nutrition-related knowledge and self-efficacy in older adults living at an independent senior living center.
    • Community Marketing and Recipe Distribution Project to Improve Food Security and Food Choices

      Riddle, Emily; VanAmburg, Katherine; Perl, Sandra (2022)
      Introduction: This study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of a two-part community intervention on fresh and frozen produce access and self-perceived diet quality among participants of a local food pantry through a Quasi-experiment design. The study took place at The Living Well Mission in Penn Yan, New York which consisted of 10 selected participants. Social media marketing efforts took place to advocate for fresh and frozen produce donations over the course of four weeks. Three recipes per week, totaling 12 recipes, were also provided with the required ingredients and tips for substitutions. Methods: A two-part intervention consisting of marketing efforts and recipe distribution was examined through a pre and post-survey to examine the changes in pantry food donations as well as nutrition intake and self-perceived efficacy of meal preparation and diet quality. Results: Four participants did not partake in the post-survey intervention. Low level marketing efforts had no impact on food donations. The weekly grocery supplies and recipes did not significantly improve intake of fresh or frozen despite no waste being reported by post-survey participants. The intervention did prevent hunger during the last week of the month for one participant. Conclusion: The intervention did not reveal significant results. Low level marketing efforts were ineffective towards changing food donations and recipe and ingredient distribution did not improve self-efficacy and diet quality despite similar studies finding significant results. Recipe sampling or more nutrition education may be necessary in future studies.
    • The Effectiveness of Nutrition Education in Seniors Over the Age of 65 in Leading a Heart Healthy Lifestyle

      Riddle, Emily; Ziomek, MaKayla M. (2022)
      The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a nutrition educational program on increasing individual knowledge in leading a heart healthy lifestyle among seniors aged 65 years and older. The design of the study was Quasi-experimental and was completed at the Amherst Senior Center, Amherst, Massachusetts. Participants were recruited through paper flyers as well as verbal recruitment during an exercise program at the senior center. Participant knowledge was assessed utilizing a pre-and post-test which included a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). Duplicate tests were given prior to an educational session and two weeks post-education. Participant performance was evaluated by comparing test grades and results from the FFQ. Five men and women over the age of 65 years were included in the study. Data analysis was completed using IBM SPSS Statistics 26. Results showed participation in the educational session increased test scores by 24.6% (p<0.005) on average. There were no significant results between pre-and post-test FFQ between educational sessions. This indicated no significant difference in dietary changes. This limitation may be related to the number of education sessions that were conducted. Ideally, nutrition education sessions can be tailored to individual, or group needs, with the idea that these programs can be repeated for future use leading to positive health results.
    • Dark garden: MFA Thesis - Photography and Related Media

      Hardin, Jackson (2022-05)
      Dark Garden tells a story in images taken from my own experiences, images that communicate the murky interrelations of between people and the complex systems of life we are a part of, using art as a means of relaying these ideas and feelings telepathically to the viewer, a process ecocritical theorist Timothy Morton calls "spooky action at a distance" (Morton, 81). The images depict things I'm afraid to lose: people, places, environments, experiences, possibilities. The project describes how the body carries the anxiety associated with an uncertain climate future, and how the tension of premature grieving for imagined futures, vanishing species, and dying forests surfaces between people and their environments.
    • Bloom: MFA Thesis - Ceramics

      Wells, Avery (2022-05)
      I create expressive, colorful vessels and botanical sculptures that complicate the relationship between surface and form. Beginning with historic wallpaper patterns that evoke feminine domestic spaces, I repetitively rework motifs from these sources into illustrations and ceramic objects. I imagine these patterns being squeezed out into space through my hands, peeling themselves off the walls they originated from and taking three-dimensional form. As my work confronts the viewer in the round, I imagine it taking on a life of its own, developing a personality and vibrant agency. I feel that I am able to collaborate with my sculptures, seeking an escape from the historic standards that have been applied to women and their creative work. However, I am also seeking the joy and comfort that can be found by embracing the decorative and elements of my own femininity.