Now showing items 1-20 of 6879

    • Tensions of the body: transgender literature and the body in space and time

      Field, Sophia (2022-05)
      As academics are to understand it, transgender studies generally concerns itself with the triangulated relationship between the body, culture, and power (the power to name, to normalize, and to efface). This thesis is intimately concerned with such subjects, examining representations of the body, culture, and power in two contemporary transgender texts: Torrey Peters’ 2021 novel Detransition, Baby, and Maggie Nelson’s 2015 autobiography The Argonauts. In these two examples of transgender literature, authors represent the body as a heuristic tool; a field against which normative fantasies play out in frequently incongruent ways.
    • Art as Advocacy: Protecting the US-Mexico Border Environment in Amanda Keller Konya’s “Specimens”

      Whittingham, Georgina (Ubiquity Press, 2021-08-03)
      Amanda Keller-Konya's multilayered photographic image construction in "Specimens" from North America's Most Polluted River" helps the viewer perceive the magnitude of the damage sustained by US-Mexico's border area residents in California's Imperial Valley and the effort necessary to clean the area's New River. The river originates in Mexicali city, capital of Baja California, northwestern Mexico, crosses the border, flows north through California's Imperial Valley, and empties into the Salton Sea, the state's largest and most contaminated lake. A sustainable environment is crucial to the health of the valley's residents and farms that supply most of the nation's winter produce. Recovery of the area's ecosystem requires solving the impact of agricultural runoff and toxic dust as less water flows into the Salton Sea, a body of water vital for the wellbeing of Southern Californians, the fish, and the migratory birds that depend on it for survival.
    • Does Reducing Supervision for Low-Risk Probationers Jeopardize Community Safety?

      Duru, Haci; Lovens, Lori Brusman; Lovins, Brian (2020-06)
      The number of individuals on community supervision in the U.S. far surpasses those incarcerated. Of the 6.6 million addults in 2016 under correctional control, more than 4'5 million (68%) were serving a term of ommunity supervision. Eighty-one percent of the individuals placed on community supervision were on probation. With large numbers of individuals on supervised probation, agencies must explore how to best allocate resources while meeting mandates for increased public safety.
    • Singquandles, psyquandles, and singular knots: A survey

      Ceniceros, Jose; Churchill, Indu R.; Elhamdadi, Mohamed; Hajij, Mustafa (World Scientific Pub Co Pte Ltd, 2022-02-24)
      In this short survey, we review recent results dealing with algebraic structures (quandles, psyquandles, and singquandles) related to singular knot theory. We first explore the singquandles counting invariant and then consider several recent enhancements to this invariant. These enhancements include a singquandle cocycle invariant and several polynomial invariants of singular knots obtained from the singquandle structure. We then explore psyquandles which can be thought of as generalizations of oriented singquandles, and review recent developments regarding invariants of singular knots obtained from psyquandles.
    • Trigging Deeper into the Identities; A Comprehensive Approach

      Wade, Carol; Williams, Sa'adia (SUNY Brockport, Department of Education and Human Development, 2022-05)
      These lessons on trigonometric identities were designed to maximize student understanding and minimize teacher lift in terms of planning. They were created to foster an environment of collaboration in a mathematics classroom. This thesis delves into teaching students the three Pythagorean trigonometric identities and later the trigonometric sum and difference formulas as a way of deepening students’ knowledge before they are tasked with tackling their advanced mathematics courses.
    • Art Activism for an Anticolonial Future

      Garrido Castellano, Carlos (SUNY Press, 2021-10-01)
      Analyzing the confluence between coloniality and activist art, Art Activism for an Anticolonial Future argues that there is much to gain from approaching contemporary politically committed art practices from the angle of anticolonial, postcolonial, and decolonial struggles. These struggles inspired a vast yet underexplored set of ideas about art and cultural practices and did so decades before the acceptance of radical artistic practices by mainstream art institutions. Carlos Garrido Castellano argues that art activism has been confined to a limited spatial and temporal framework—that of Western culture and the modernist avant-garde. Assumptions about the individual creator and the belated arrival of derivative avant-garde aesthetics to the periphery have generated a narrow view of “political art” at the expense of our capacity to perceive a truly global alternative praxis. Garrido Castellano then illuminates such a praxis, focusing attention on socially engaged art from the Global South, challenging the supposed universality of Western artistic norms, and demonstrating the role of art in promoting and configuring a collective critical consciousness in postcolonial public spheres.
    • Feasibility and applicability of a clinical assessment of both the ON and OFF pathways in patients with glaucoma and controls.

      Moore-Stoll, Veronica (2022-05-03)
      "Purpose: To assess the feasibility and clinical utility of a head-mounted, On/Off perimetry test and to investigate the effect of early to moderate glaucoma on reaction time and accuracy to ON and OFF perimetric stimuli. Methods: We tested one eye each of 9 patients with early to moderate primary open angle glaucoma (mean = 71.88 years, std = 5.17), 9 visually-normal control patients of a similar age (mean = 63.88 years, std = 5.17 ) , and 9 visually-normal optometry students (ages 22-25 years). We used a head mounted display equipped with an eye tracker (HTC VIVE embedded Tobii). Custom software (Unity, version 2017) was used to create the stimuli and a library provided by Tobii Pro was used to measure eye movements at 120 Hz. Stimulus size changed as a function of eccentricity using a power law relationship: stimulus size= minimum scale*(eccentricity/5)^α. Eye movements were restricted to a central circle with a 2.5 degree radius. Stimulus contrast was initially set to 100%. A single test comprised of 579 trials, including 51 catch trials, presented at 90 different positions in the visual field. Each test location was repeated 3 times for both light and dark stimuli, with 6 repeats in each of two blind spot positions. Results: Our results demonstrate asymmetry between the two achromatic visual transduction pathways. These results support previous findings that dark targets elicit a faster and more accurate response than light targets, when presented on binary background noise. Our results extend previous work by demonstrating that the two pathways remain asymmetrical in eccentricities up to 30 degree from fixation. We also show that the relationship between the percentage of correct responses for ON pathway and OFF pathway stimuli follows a power function, wherein glaucoma and controls overlap (R2=0.842) . This overlap decreases when we quantify only the subthreshold (unseen) increment targets in a linear relationship (R2=0.7074). All controls had less than 12% of subthreshold increment targets whereas the percentage of subthreshold targets was higher for 75% of the glaucoma subjects, even in early stages of the disease. CONCLUSION We have demonstrated that ON/OFF perimetry is feasible in a VR environment and confirmed an asymmetry between the ON and OFF pathways in patients with glaucoma and control patients in both central and peripheral visual fields. We measured on-pathway deficits in patients with limited loss of visual sensitivity which may improve detection of early disease. Future work will focus on optimizing stimulus parameters to improve the sensitivity and specificity of this test."
    • Racism and the Discourse of Phobias: Negrophobia, Xenophobia and More---Dialogue with Kim and Sundstrom

      Garcia, J. L .A. (2020)
      The article discusses recism as a topic for conceptual analysis, touching on other phobias as well.
    • Creating Custom Desmos Activities Using Desmos Activity Builder to Create Effective Lessons For Online Learning During Covid-19

      Wade, Carol; DeGilio, Matthew (SUNY Brockport, Department of Education and Human Development, 2022-03)
      This curriculum project was designed to support mathematics teachers in remote and hybrid instruction by guiding them in how to develop Desmos lessons using Desmos Activity Builder. Teachers will find development directives for three exemplar lessons (available here) with lesson activities that can be customized for an individual classroom. This flexibility makes Desmos a great platform choice for any teacher struggling to engage students. Desmos lessons allows students to interact with their peers and teachers in way that simulates actual classroom experiences.
    • Applying Mathematics Language Routines to the New York State Grade 8 Mathematics Test Questions

      Wade, Carol; Ludek, Audrey C. (SUNY Brockport, Department of Education and Human Development, 2022-05)
      This curriculum project was designed to incorporate student communication and mathematical discourse into Grade 8 Mathematics curriculum. The five non-sequential lessons and learning activities were designed to encourage mathematical discourse between students and their peers. The lessons support the development of conceptual understanding, particularly regarding questions from the New York State Grade 8 Mathematics Test. Topics covered include solving mathematical problems involving volume of cones, using functions to model relationships between quantities, analyzing and solving pairs of simultaneous linear equations, and understanding congruence and similarity. All of these lessons are aligned with the New York State Next Generation Learning Standards for Grade 8 Mathematics
    • Managing Tuckahoe: Transitioning to a Village Administrator

      Hattery, Michael; Watt, Celia (SUNY Brockport, 2021)
      This review of change in governance and administration in the Village of Tuckahoe, New York is one in a series of communities in New York that took initiative to change the administration of their local government. These local initiatives were reviewed and summarized in 2020 by the Public Management Program (PMP), Department of Public Administration, SUNY Brockport.
    • Effects Of Correcting Fixation Disparity On Digital Eye Strain

      Saksena, Sanjana (2022-04-20)
      Digital Eye Strain (DES) is a widespread and highly prevalent condition whose incidence appears to be rising during the present pandemic. It comprises a range of visual and ocular symptoms which occur after viewing a digital screen for an extended period of time. Previous work from our laboratory has shown the magnitude of fixation disparity to be the only clinical parameter that is significantly correlated with DES symptoms. Therefore, this study sought to determine whether correcting the underlying fixation disparity will significantly reduce DES symptoms. Thirty young, visually-normal students were required to read randomly generated words from a digital tablet device for 20 minutes. Three different trials were performed, with the subject wearing either: (i) the prism that corrected their fixation disparity, (ii) the same magnitude of prism as for condition (i) but with the opposite base direction or (iii) a near addition lens that corrected the fixation disparity. Immediately after the reading task, subjects rated their ocular and visual symptoms on a questionnaire. There was no significant difference between the mean symptom scores for the three conditions. However, this may be due, in part, to the small number of subjects encountered with large values of fixation disparity. Future studies should further examine the range of oculomotor responses associated with DES in order to provide appropriate treatment options.
    • Generating Facial Character: A Systematic Method Accumulating Expressive Histories

      Jofre, Ana (MIT Press, 2022-04)
      The author presents a method to simulate facial character development by accumulating an expressive history onto a face. The model analytically combines facial features from Paul Ekman’s seven universal facial expressions using a simple Markov chain algorithm. The output is a series of 3D digital faces created in Blender with Python. The results show that systematically imprinting features from emotional expressions onto a neutral face transforms it into one with distinct character. This method could be applied to creative works that depend on character creation, ranging from figurative sculpture to game design, and allows the creator to incorporate chance into the creative process. The author demonstrates the method’s application to sculpture with ceramic casts of generated faces.
    • Library renovation: From setbacks to success.

      Wells, Elaine (Research Caucus of the Medical Library Association, 2021-02-25)
      The journey started at a 2016 meeting of the college’s Learning Resources Committee, which I chair as Library Director, A student representative casually commented that our Library looked “dated”. Not that we actually WERE dated, we have electronic resources, 24/7 remote access, printers, scanners, wireless, and a state-of-the-art Library Management System. However, through the eyes of our young student, the Library looked “like something from the 1970s.” Anyone who has lived through that decade’s will know that was not meant as a compliment. The student’s criticism prompted the Dean of Academic Affairs, who sat in on the meeting, to ask when the Library had had its last “facelift.” That was an easy one to answer - as far as I knew…never. And I’ve been here over 20 years. Just like that, a renovation was born. How hard could this be? I would query the students on what a suitable update might look like, get a budget, buy some new furniture, and go back to the business of being a librarian rather than an interior designer. Spoiler alert: not so fast.
    • Crowdsourcing Image Extraction and Annotation: Software Development and Case Study

      Jofre, Ana; Berardi, Vincent; Brennan, Kathleen P.J.; Cornejo, Aisha; Bennett, Carl; Harlan, John (Digital Humanities Quarterly, 2020-03)
      We describe the development of web-based software that facilitates large-scale, crowdsourced image extraction and annotation within image-heavy corpora that are of interest to the digital humanities. An application of this software is then detailed and evaluated through a case study where it was deployed within Amazon Mechanical Turk to extract and annotate faces from the archives of Time magazine. Annotation labels included categories such as age, gender, and race that were subsequently used to train machine learning models. The systemization of our crowdsourced data collection and worker quality verification procedures are detailed within this case study. We outline a data verification methodology that used validation images and required only two annotations per image to produce high-fidelity data that has comparable results to methods using five annotations per image. Finally, we provide instructions for customizing our software to meet the needs for other studies, with the goal of offering this resource to researchers undertaking the analysis of objects within other image-heavy archives.
    • Faces extracted from Time Magazine 1923-2014

      Jofre, Ana; Berardi, Vincent; Bennett, Carl; Reale, Michael; Cole, Josh (Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2020-03-16)
      We present metadata of labeled faces extracted from a Time magazine archive that contains 3,389 issues ranging from 1923 to 2012. The data we are publishing consists of three subsets: Dataset 1) the gender labels and image characteristics for each of the 327,322 faces that were automatically-extracted from the entire Time archive, Dataset 2) a subset of 8,789 faces from a sample of 100 issues that were labeled by Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT) workers according to ten dimensions (including gender) and used as training data to produce Dataset 1, and Dataset 3) the raw data collected from the AMT workers before being processed to produce Dataset 2.
    • What’s in a Face? Gender Representation of Faces in Time, 1940s-1990s

      Jofre, Ana; Cole, Josh; Berardi, Vincent; Bennett, Carl; Reale, Michael (Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2020-03-16)
      We extracted 327,322 faces from an archive of Time magazine containing 3,389 issues dating from 1923 to 2014, classified the gender of each extracted face, and discovered that the proportion of female faces contained within this archive varied in interesting ways over time. The proportion of female faces first peaked in the mid-to-late 1940s. This was followed by a dip lasting from the mid-1950s to the early 1960s. The 1970s saw another peak followed by a dip over the course of the 1980s. Finally, we see a slow and steady rise in the proportion of female faces from the early 1990s onwards. In this paper, we seek to make sense of these variations through an interdisciplinary framework drawing on psychology, visual studies (in particular, photography theory), and history. Through a close reading of our Time archive from the 1940s through the 1990s, we conclude that the visual representation of women in Time magazine correlates with attitudes toward women in both the historical context of the era and the textual content of the magazine.
    • The White Indians of Mexican Cinema

      García Blizzard, Mónica (SUNY Press, 2022-04-01)
      The White Indians of Mexican Cinema theorizes the development of a unique form of racial masquerade—the representation of Whiteness as Indigeneity—during the Golden Age of Mexican cinema, from the 1930s to the 1950s. Adopting a broad decolonial perspective while remaining grounded in the history of local racial categories, Mónica García Blizzard argues that this trope works to reconcile two divergent discourses about race in postrevolutionary Mexico: the government-sponsored celebration of Indigeneity and mestizaje (or the process of interracial and intercultural mixing), on the one hand, and the idealization of Whiteness, on the other. Close readings of twenty films and primary source material illustrate how Mexican cinema has mediated race, especially in relation to gender, in ways that project national specificity, but also reproduce racist tendencies with respect to beauty, desire, and protagonism that survive to this day. This sweeping survey illuminates how Golden Age films produced diverse, even contradictory messages about the place of Indigeneity in the national culture.
    • Federal Oversight of the America's Marine Highway Program in Response to the Mandates of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007

      Yahalom, Shmuel; Smith, Brian D (2022-04)
      The America’s Marine Highway Program is an initiative that seeks to ease traffic congestion in landside transportation corridors by moving freight from those highways and railroads to waterborne vessels that travel on nearby rivers and coasts. The program markets itself as an ambitious, national-scale initiative that seeks to drive economic growth and improve quality of life. Its genesis, however, is a three-page section of a 310-page Congressional act that provided for no funding and little oversight. Given this juxtaposition of good intentions and bureaucratic constraints, this paper will examine the historical context for commercial use of the nation’s inland waterway system, analyze the objectives and mechanics of the program in its current state, explore the government’s legal basis for engaging in such activities, and make specific recommendations for the program going forward.
    • The Use of Voice to Empower Community Building

      Richards, Julie; Chisholm, Nydia; Smith, Siera (2022-02-18)