• Webcomic Distribution: Distribution Methods, Monetization and Niche Markets

      Volo, Kevin (2011-01-01)
      The purpose of this project was to examine what happens when it is time to distribute a webcomic and how webcomic distribution can be compared to the music industry and journalism blogger. Both industries have undergone a change in how they interact and deliver product to consumers and readers. To do this I examined three areas that make up webcomic distribution: community, monetization and niche genres. My project will also examine three challenges of how a webcomic can be used to present scholarly research. The challenges that will be covered are: how to use citations, how to provide references for another artists work and how to present data such as charts, timelines and graphs. To do this I constructed a webcomic and created a website to detail my findings. It can be viewed at: www.webcomicdistribution.com.
    • What Do Customers Really Seek From Their Mobile Service Providers?

      Ramkrishna, Deepa; Hash, Larry; Adviser; Marsh, John; Reviewer (2016-12-17)
      With the number of smartphone and wireless internet users set to increase at a rapid pace over the next few years, there is an increased need for a next generation mobile wireless technology such as 5G. Before discussing 5G, it is important to understand consumer needs today. This paper includes findings from an online survey that was administered to students and alums of SUNY Polytechnic and other universities in the US to understand what drives choice of mobile service providers. Additionally, the challenges faced by consumers with respect to their mobile and wireless use were tested and the improvements they seek was sought. The author then uses secondary research to understand if 5G will address these consumer needs and facilitate other commercial applications. While consumers might be fairly satisfied with their mobile service providers today, there is still room for improvement on some aspects such as network coverage, call quality and data speed. Implementation of 5G through efficient spectrum use and technologies such as Massive MIMO and MmWave will help address the above and also facilitate broader commercial applications in multiple industries such as driverless cars, smart cities etc.
    • A Wireless Intrusion Detection for the Next Generation (5G) Networks

      Kholidy, Hisham A.; Ferrucci, Richard; Kholidy, Hisham A.; Advisor (SUNY Polytechnic Institute, 2020-05)
      5G data systems are closed to delivery to the public. The question remains how security will impact the release of this cutting edge architecture. 5G data systems will be sending massive amounts of personal data due to the fact that everybody in the world is using mobile phones these days. With everyone using a 5G device, this architecture will have a huge surface area for attackers to compromise. Using machine learning techniques previously applied to 802.11 networks. We will show that improving upon these previous works, we can have a better handle on security when it comes to 5G architecture security. We find that using a machine learning classifier known as LogIT boost, combined with a selected combination of feature selection, we can provide optimal results in identifying three different classes of traffic referred to as normal, flooding, and injection traffic. We drastically decrease the time taken to perform this classification while improving the results. We simulate the Device2Device (D2D) connections involved in the 5G systems using the AWID dataset. The evaluation and validation of the classification approach are discussed in details in this thesis.
    • WRITING FROM THE BORDERLINES: Online Resource for Libraries to Create and Promote Collections by Latinx Authors

      Stam, Kathryn; Thesis Advisor; Lizardi, Ryan; Second Reader; Reed, Julia Guerrero (2020)
      As of July 1, 2018, the “Hispanic” or “Latino” population of the United States was 18.3 percent of the total United States population, making them the most numerous, officially-recognized ethnic or racial minority in the country. Although the terms Hispanic and Latino are used interchangeably by the United States Census Bureau, they do not refer to the same populations. Hispanic means anyone with Spanish European ancestry, which includes all of the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America as well as Spain. It does not include Brazil (where Portuguese is spoken) or other territories that were successfully colonized by France, Great Britain, and the Netherlands. Also, Latin America has a long and painful history of Iberian colonialism, and there are large indigenous communities in Latin America with little or no Spanish or Portuguese DNA that would not be considered, nor would they want to be considered, anything other than indigenous. Latino/a is shorthand for latinoamericano and in the United States, refers to anyone living in this country who has ancestry from a Spanish, Portuguese, or French speaking Latin American country. This term therefore excludes persons from areas colonized by the British and Dutch, as well as persons from romance language speaking European countries. The term “Latinx” recently has gained popularity as a gender-neutral way to refer to this Latino/a population. Although Latinx people comprise 18.3 percent of the United States population, they comprise only 6 percent of the persons employed or otherwise engaged in the United States publishing industry. This means that Latinx writers are under-represented in the United States publishing industry and in the number of books that are published. As agents of social change and points of information access, librarians are well-positioned to change this situation by supporting and promoting Latinx authors. The purpose of the accompanying website. (www.writingfromtheborderlines.com) is to provide a guide for libraries wishing to create, increase, or promote collections by Latinx authors. The website has five sections. The first section is an explanation of the term “Latinx”. The second section is a list of Latinx authors organized by the audiences for whom they write. The third section describes grassroots campaigns to increase diversity in literature. The fourth section has an infographic and explanatory text demonstrating the population and publishing industry data. Finally, the fifth section offers ideas on how libraries can promote their diverse collections.