• A Case Study on Apache HBase

      Nalla, Rohit Reddy; Sengupta, Sam; Adviser; Novillo, Jorge; Reviewer; Rezk, Mohamed; Reviewer (2015-05-16)
      Apache HBase is an open-source, non-relational and a distributed data base system built on top of HDFS (Hadoop Distributed File system). HBase was designed post Google’s Big table and it is written in Java. It was developed as a part of Apache’s Hadoop Project. It provides a kind of fault – tolerant mechanism to store minor amounts of non-zero items caught within large amounts of empty items. HBase is used when we require real-time read/write access to huge data bases. HBase project was started by the end of 2006 by Chad Walters and Jim Kellerman at Powerset.[2] The main purpose of HBase is to process large amounts of data. Mike Cafarella worked on code of the working system initially and later Jim Kellerman carried it to the next stage. HBase was first released as a part of Hadoop 0.15.0 in October 2007[2]. The project goal was holding of very large tables like billions of rows X millions of columns. In May 2010, HBase advanced to a major project and it became an Apache Top Level Project. Several applications like Adobe, Twitter, Yahoo, Trend Micro etc. use this data base. Social networking sites like Facebook have implemented its messenger application using HBase. This document helps us to understand how HBase works and how is it different from other data bases. This document highlights about the current challenges in data security and a couple of models have been proposed towards the security and levels of data access to overcome the challenges. This document also discusses the workload challenges and techniques to overcome. Also an overview has been given on how HBase has been implemented in real time application Facebook messenger app.
    • Centralized Information Site for IDT Imternational Students

      Sathiaseelan, Akila (2008-12-01)
      This qualitative research study analyzes the outcomes of a centralized information site created for prospective and current international students for Information Design and Technology department. Information specific to International students’ needs were gathered and categorized into major groups. A Flash site was constructed based upon those needs by applying ease of use, maintainability, search-ability and Human Centered Design (HCD) principles. Qualitative researches, namely, Participatory Action Research and Qualitative interviewing were applied for data collection and data analysis to yield the results.
    • Characterization and Control of the Surface of the Topological Insulator Bi2Se3

      Green, Avery James; Diebold, Alain; Advisor (2017-12)
      The field of topological insulator (TI) materials is new. The ideal TI contains surface states in helical Dirac cones that can be used for spintronics or interconnect applications. Of the TI class, Bi2Se3 is the most promising for applications due to its stoichiometric composition, its relatively large band gap (0.3 eV), and the central (??-point) position of the Dirac cone in its 2D surface band structure. Although the theoretical solid-state models that the TI field has produced are powerful and unique, their novel emergent physical properties are not universally observed in every sample. These materials are difficult to grow and maintain under ambient conditions. Growths tend to either not be applicable to wafer-scale production or produce high polycrystallinity, and all samples experience natural oxidation, band bending, and intrinsic n-doping, which generates spin-degenerate or bulk conduction. This thesis contains a primer on topologically non-trivial materials, and two studies aimed at understanding and minimizing defects at the surface of Bi2Se3. In the first, the aging process of Bi2Se3 when exposed to air at room temperature is investigated. The time scale and topographic changes of the oxidation process at micromechanically exfoliated surfaces are measured, and an optical model of the bulk and oxide layers are developed. The surface appears to oxidize starting at 2 hours after exfoliation, and continuing through 1.5 weeks, by which time, the oxide layer growth has reached an asymptote of 1.9 nm. New optical characterization methods are developed to monitor the orientation of the crystal (via second harmonic generation) and to measure the oxide growth at the surface (using spectroscopic ellipsometry and the derived dielectric functions of the bulk and oxide layers). The goal of the second study is to assess the use of Se capping and subsequent thermal decapping to preserve a pristine surface and maintain a constant Fermi level. This was measured by annealing samples in a UHV environment to successively higher temperatures until the Bi2Se3 film decomposed, and measuring the surface crystallinity, topography, surface chemistry, and Fermi level between each anneal. Thermally decapping samples has no measurable effect on crystallinity, minimal effect on surface topography, reveals the expected Bi-Se surface bonds, and retains a mid-gap Fermi level. This may serve as a reference to improve the fabrication process of devices that include Bi2Se3.
    • Climate Change: Restaurant and Employee Awareness Through the Use of Tutorials

      Rowe, Amy (2015-12)
      Restaurants have a profound affect on climate change because of the large amounts of water and food that is discarded by the food industry on a daily basis. Most restaurant employers are not educated enough about food waste and its affect on climate change; so, these employers do not educate their employees on the best practices to avoid food waste. However, many companies use multimedia learning to train employees on menu offerings, company policies, payroll or other pertinent information, but do not use the opportunity to educate employees and customers about the food industry’s affects on climate change. Tutorials with infographics are a large part of multimedia learning because it offers a way for learners to do things, such as, selfinteract, read, solve problems, and answer questions. With distance learning becoming more and more popular, tutorial style teaching is as well. Multimedia learning aids are costeffective for restaurants because it accommodates multiple learning styles while covering a lot of material at once. As demonstrated by this project’s website, tutorials and infographics, when used in a multimedia setting, can motivate restaurant employees to learn about important issues, like climate change. This paper seeks to find, and to discuss, what restaurants are doing to educate employees about climate change, what the significance of climate change means to a restaurant’s best practices, and how multimedia learning can educate and influence restaurant employees to move toward best practices which will then help reverse the effects of climate change.
    • Cloud-SCADA Penetrate: Practical Implementation for Hacking Cloud Computing and Critical SCADA Systems

      Kholidy, Hisham A. (SUNY Polytechnic Institute, 2020)
      In this report, we discuss some of our hacking and security solutions that we developed at our Advanced Cybersecurity Research Lab (ACRL). This report consists of the following five main experimental packages: 1) Exploiting the cloud computing system using a DDoS attack and developing a distributed deployment of a cloud based Intrusion Detection System (IDS) solution. 2) Hacking SCADA systems components. 3) Hacking Metasploitable machines. 4) Hacking Windows 7 system. 5) Windows Post Exploitation.
    • Comic Books as American Propaganda During World War II

      Dellecese, David; Stam, Kathryn; Thesis Advisor; Lizardi, Ryan; Second Reader; Kahn, Russell; Instructor (2018-05)
      American comic books were a relatively, but quite popular form of media during the years of World War II. Amid a limited media landscape that otherwise consisted of radio, film, newspaper, and magazines, comics served as a useful tool in engaging readers of all ages to get behind the war effort. The aims of this research was to examine a sampling of messages put forth by comic book publishers before and after American involvement in World War II in the form of fictional comic book stories. In this research, it is found that comic book storytelling/messaging reflected a theme of American isolation prior to U.S. involvement in the war, but changed its tone to become a strong proponent for American involvement post-the bombing of Pearl Harbor. This came in numerous forms, from vilification of America’s enemies in the stories of super heroics, the use of scrap, rubber, paper, or bond drives back on the homefront to provide resources on the frontlines, to a general sense of patriotism. This research looks to the motivations behind such storytelling in the background of comic book writers and artists as well as involvement from government agencies such as the War Writer’s Board. It’s also important to note that while comics often vilified the enemies of America through the use of terrible stereotypes and caricature, within those same pages were messages promoting solidarity among religion, race, and background for the purpose of winning the war. These mixed messages often make for very contradictory presentations, especially when looked at retroactively and allow comic books from this time period to be looked at as media artifacts, providing insight into cultural and societal ways of thinking during this period, with appropriate historical context. I have created a website supplement to this thesis where many examples of the types of images discussed have been collected and organized for viewing: https://comicsgotowar.weebly.com/
    • A Community Approach to Discovering the September 11 LOC Web Archive

      Bingley, Matthew (2012-05-01)
      The Library of Congress September 11 Web Archive contains more websites than is reasonably analyzable by a single researcher. This project demonstrates the design of a site, titled “Source September 11,” which would enlist volunteers to analyze the Archive‟s contents. Moreover, the proposed site would allow volunteers to produce original, curated WebStories about themes in the September 11 Web Archive. The proposed site would thus have a dual function as a research and civic site, and one in which volunteers participate in its maintenance and functioning. This thesis is intended to be read in conjunction with a video overview which demonstrates the site. It can be found at http://people.sunyit.edu/~binglem/Thesis2/Thesis2.html.
    • Comparison of Network Switch Architectures by CISCO

      Vemula, Veera Venkata Satyanarayana; Hash, Larry; Advisor (2016-02-01)
      This project is targeted to compare two major switching architectures provided by CISCO. CISCO is a network device manufacturer who has contributed to networking world by inventing many networking protocols which are used to improve the network performance and network health. In this document the switching architectures CATALYST and NEXUS are compared. All the available features in each architectures are listed and working of the supported protocols is explained in detail. The document also considers three network scenarios and explains which architecture is best suited and explains why in detail.
    • A Content Analysis of Educational Scaffolding Used in Post-and-Reply Sessions on a Mathematics Homework Help Message Board

      Darrah, Nick (2011-07-01)
      With the great influx of resources available to students within their own homes, answers and assistance to traditional homework assignments are being sought. Online searches and discussion boards have become an immediate refuge for those with a lack of understanding. Classical educational theories, too, have been translated for these digital realms to better assess authentic learning experiences. Analyzing and understanding the discussion patterns and key phrases employed by message board members acting as online tutors in terms of scaffolding theory may yield a better clarification and assessment of learning experiences within an online math homework help message board. The discovery of these relationships may help optimize quests for new information by demonstrating the need and importance of communication skills in mathematics.
    • Creating a browser extension to improve PubMed record full text linking

      Locascio, Jill K.; Kahn, Russell; Thesis Adviser; Yucel, Ibrahim; Second Reader (2018)
      PubMed is a free search engine developed and maintained by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) which searches the MEDLINE database of references and abstracts on life sciences and biomedical topics. As such it is a valuable search tool for researchers in the health sciences. In my work as a Digital and Technical Services librarian at SUNY College of Optometry, I have registered complaints from frustrated users seeking to connect to full text articles from PubMed. They have reported finding the process confusing and containing too many steps which disrupt their search process. This project took a critical look at PubMed’s linking service, LinkOut, used information design theory to propose improvements, and implemented those improvements through the design and development of a browser extension which will be presented to the SUNY Optometry community. This paper describes the process taken to complete this project.
    • Creating a User-Friendly Mobile Application Prototype

      Stam, Kathryn; Thesis Advisor; Lizardi, Ryan; Second Reader; Sherman, Michael (2020-05)
      In today's world users have access to hundreds of thousands of mobile applications at the touch of their fingers. There are over two hundred and fifty million smart phone users out there and that number is growing with over 80% of Americans owning a smartphone. There is nothing more frustrating than trying to use an application and not being sure what to do. Colors or fonts can make things hard to read, too many options to click with no real direction; this will cause frustration for the user and negative feelings towards the application. Making sure that a mobile application is user-friendly is essential to its success, the first time a user opens up the application they need to know exactly what to do and how each action will interact. This project will include a complete sports betting mobile application prototype that covers all the necessary principles of a user-friendly application, along with research to explain why these principles are important. To make a user-friendly application, it is very important to make sure that the user is engaged. This was done by choosing a color scheme that gives a positive emotion, which will bring the user back and continue to use the application. Also, limit what actions the user can do, this can be done with consistency, constraint, and control. Consistency makes sure that users see similarity on how to perform all actions. Constraint limits the actions a user can perform to reduce any errors. Control makes sure that users of all levels have the ability to use the application.
    • Creating an effective online course and community with best practices from the disciplines of Visual Design, User Experience and online learning experiences.

      Spirizzi, Bianca; Kahn, Russell; Thesis Adviser; Stam, Kathryn; Second Reader (2018-05)
      (Introduction) Online Learning requires learners to take an extra step. No one is forcing them to show up, participate or contribute. Creating an online learning space that encourages students to engage is the main goal of an online course. This can be helped along greatly with the correct application of best practices from the fields of Visual Design, User Experience and online learning. By setting up an active learning course structure based on Bloom’s taxonomy, online courses become much more engaging. This, along with a Critiquing segment will be applied to this online course prototype. By offering a guide on how to critique and always having a reference available for students when they need to critique create is a good rule to follow for this online course. Course will combine quilting and design into each lesson.
    • Creating An Effective US History Timeline Using Principles of Information Design

      Stam, Kathryn; McNamara, Brendan (2019-07)
      Visual information has been used as a form of communication throughout the years. In this thesis project, I plan to address historical illiteracy by utilizing universal principles of information design to create a digital US History timeline that students could reference easily and consistently as a historical resource to contextualize information. Implementing design theory, the timeline prototype aims to be aesthetically pleasing and proficient at attracting student users. Furthermore, a digital version of the timeline seeks to be innovative and enable teachers to edit accordingly and update more efficiently. Steps to convert the digital timeline to a wallpaper border for the classroom environment will also be examined as it may provide a more constant information tool than temporary paper bulletin board versions currently in use.
    • Creating An Online Course Teaching Social Media Applications

      Sweeney, Vanessa (2013-05-01)
      Due to the shift from Instructor centered learning to student centered learning, careful consideration has to be given to the needs of adult learners in all facets of education. Time restrictions and the learner’s current skill level are two areas that need to be addressed in adult learning. To address these issues in a non-credit course on social media applications that I am teaching this summer face to face, I have developed an online learning environment to supplement in classroom instruction. The online learning environment is able to be accessed by students when it’s convenient for them, which helps expand upon the instruction that they receive in the classroom. In addition, learning theories and information design principles are applied to the online learning environment to increase the student’s ability to learn, as well focus on web accessibility. The online learning environment has been developed using WordPress; a free and open source web content management system.
    • Creating an Online Game for Farm Safety

      Begley, Robert D. (2013-04-01)
      The New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health (NYCAMH) has a need for a web-based educational game to educate families on farm safety. This project demonstrates a proposed game design that combines the elements of gaming that enhance learning with the feedback received from NYCAMH. Feedback was solicited through a series of prototypes delivered to NYCAMH through an agile software development process. The proposed design follows a constructivist approach to place the learner in a context based on reality. The aspects of the game design that engage and motivate students by blending entertainment with learning are discussed. A prototype for this project can be found at http://web.cs.sunyit.edu/~begleyr/nycamh/prototype_5/.
    • Creating Digital Narratives: The Structure and Design of Stories Told Across Multiple Media

      Stackelberg, Peter Von (2011-12-01)
      Transmedia narratives are a rapidly emerging form of communication in which stories are told across multiple media. Transmedia narratives are being developed for a wide variety of applications including entertainment, education, marketing, advertising, organizational change, and activism. The integration of several different media into a cohesive and coherent narrative is a major challenge for the creators of transmedia narrative. Among those challenges are keeping readers/viewers interested in a narrative scattered across multiple media and providing a comprehensive framework to guide transmedia project design and development teams. The research question of this thesis focuses on how transmedia narrative designers and developers can tell effective stories across multiple media. An effective transmedia narrative is more than a collection of story elements or stories scattered across a number of different media and the process of creating them is a relatively uncharted area. Six online projects that use transmedia techniques were reviewed in order to develop a list of questions that identified key areas of transmedia narrative design. This preliminary list of questions was used to develop a framework for transmedia narrative design. Concept mapping–a graphical tool used to organize and represent knowledge–was employed to identify the concepts embedded within the questions and the relationships between those concepts and develop a hierarchical structure of transmedia concepts and their associated properties. The final round of data collection consisted of a set of online interviews with three professionals experienced in the creation of transmedia narratives. They were asked to review these materials and provide feedback that was used to validate the set of concepts identified and determine if the design-related questions sufficient for creating a transmedia narrative design framework. This thesis develops an ontology for transmedia narrative design that defines the objects, entities, and concepts and their interrelationships. This ontology provides a framework that links together the diverse elements of narrative, user engagement, and interaction design. The ontology provides a common set of concepts and interrelationships that will allow the members of a multi-disciplinary team to ―speak a common language‖ while working on various aspects of transmedia narrative design and development. A four-level process (transmedia project, storyworld, story, and scene/sequence levels) is also developed to document the steps involved in designing a transmedia narrative. The four-level process provides a structured framework that will help teams standardize their design and development approaches to transmedia narrative projects. This should help improve quality and efficiency and reduce costs associated with the development of transmedia projects. A comprehensive set of key design questions, when used in conjunction with the four-level process identified, provides a detailed framework for the design of transmedia narratives.
    • Creating Letterforms in a Digital World: The Design and Delivery of a Font

      Stam, Kathryn; Thesis Advisor; Sammon, Michelle; Second Reader; Bell, Charles (2021-05)
      I have always regarded font creation as an area of design that is highly specialized, requiring great attention to detail, and using highly skilled, hand drawn techniques to achieve the ultimate end result. While these prospects may still hold true in many respects, technological advancements have brought about great change to the overall process of design. As technology has evolved, so too have the methods of production for font and typeface design. New applications offer a multitude of interesting ways to create and design fonts. Over time, these methods of production have become increasingly more obtainable for the public and in some cases, simplified for the basic, non-designer. As a result, an increasing amount of users, both trained and untrained now have access to font design programs and applications. This project will examine the practice of font design, in both a historical context and through current trends, and will then apply this knowledge to a current software solution, in order to describe the current techniques of the creation process. In addition to this, each step of the process will be documented in order to provide a greater understanding of what is involved when learning the current process of font design. As a result of this study, the ultimate objective of this project will be the final creation of a fully realized and functional font. A downloadable version of the font design for this project can be accessed through the link below: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ZODa_kNn2yyYpP6PbtwnG4mYp6MgMTuq/view?usp=sharing
    • Creating Sustainable Documentation Using Hypermedia

      Savage, Jeff (2012-01-01)
      abstract not present in the Thesis
    • Creating the ALHFAM Knowledge Base

      Kriesen, Gretchen L. (2013-05-01)
      no abstract present in the thesis