• Adapting the Flipped Classroom for At-Risk Science Students through Learner-Centered Design

      Sullivan, Sara (2013-12-01)
      One goal of this project is to create a collection of Learner-Centered videos to meet the needs and provide learning opportunities for alternative education students. Video creation and delivery will be based on the Learner-Centered Design principles and concepts adapted from the Flipped Classroom and tailored to the needs of at-risk students within my school. Another very important goal of this project includes creating production guidelines and a teacher self-evaluation process guided by Learner-Centered Design and the Flipped Classroom. These guidelines will be useful for developing effective videos and helpful for other teachers who want to use similar teaching techniques for alternative education students.
    • Blogging as a Tool to Promote Student-Centered Learning

      Besler, Steven Richard (2013-12-01)
      With recent changes in the educational realm there is an inherent push for students to take an active role in creating their own ways to retain information. This can be defined as Student-centered learning instruction. As the teacher, it is necessary to create an environment to facilitate this style of learning. In order to make this style of learning possible, teachers must develop creative ways to present curriculum. A weblog is a tool that can make Student-centered instruction possible within the classroom. The goal of this research project is to prove that there is a correlation between the implementation of a weblog and Student-centered instruction.
    • Centralized Information Site for IDT Imternational Students

      Sathiaseelan, Akila (2008-12-01)
      This qualitative research study analyzes the outcomes of a centralized information site created for prospective and current international students for Information Design and Technology department. Information specific to International students’ needs were gathered and categorized into major groups. A Flash site was constructed based upon those needs by applying ease of use, maintainability, search-ability and Human Centered Design (HCD) principles. Qualitative researches, namely, Participatory Action Research and Qualitative interviewing were applied for data collection and data analysis to yield the results.
    • An Educational Website on Copyright Law and Remix Art

      Bugyi, John P (2013-12-01)
      Technological developments have led to various types of information (i.e., art, music, ideas, etc) that can be spread widely throughout the web for people to view, use, and share. The growth of technology and its capabilities has led to the popularity of remix art. Legal debate, however, has also increased as copyright law and the fair use doctrine has not grown at the same rate as technology. In this thesis paper and web design project, I present my research on remix art, copyright law, the fair use doctrine, and the effects of each. In the paper, I provide an overview of each topic. I also discuss how a website can be used as an engaging learning tool, how information architecture can create a responsive and accessible website, how the human-centered design theory promotes learning, and how the effectiveness of a website as a learning tool can be measured. I designed my website to be an online learning tool for undergraduate students so that they may better understand how to use and create legal remix art. The research used in this paper and website have been limited to examples of remix art, basic guidelines for legal remix art, court case examples, and the creative commons. My website is based on a human-centered design approach and other multimedia design methods that parallel the topic of remix art through the use of wikis, polls, and quizzes. A list of references was also included to guide and promote further study on the topic, as this paper and website was designed to give an overview of the topics rather than to provide legal advice. I prepared this thesis paper and website project by considering the content, target population, and design theories individually and as interacting factors.
    • Evaluating the Effectiveness of The New York Academy of Sciences Wikispace Reflecting Constructivist theory of Instructional Materials within Middle School STEM Learning Environments

      Widomski (Synakowski), Elissa (2013-12-01)
      This study’s purpose is to evaluate the effectiveness of the New York Academy of Sciences’ Wikispace reflect Constructivist theory with the use of instructional material shared with middle school teachers for grade 7-8, in STEM disciplines. The research was compiled to answer the questions of how and why a collaborative cloud environment, a wiki, could provide adequate support for mentors and teachers to instruct middle level students on STEM disciplines. Through the use of forms and questionnaires, in addition to informal interviews, and ‘speak aloud/walk through’ of the use of the wiki data was collected to answer the primary and sub questions of the study. The conclusions that were found through this study identified the strength and weaknesses of the Wikispace. This analysis supported the effectiveness of the Wikispace and the continued use of the Wikispace by the STEM mentoring program.
    • How Decisions Are Made When Creating Information Design Exhibits for Museums

      Yahnke, David R. (2008-12-01)
      This case study illustrates how and when decisions are made during the creative process occurring within two cultures: Graphic Designers and Museum Exhibitors. This study investigates the pre-visual creative process and fabrication of exhibits concerning the history of farming in Oneida County and the history of New York State during the American Revolutionary War at the Marcus Willet Visitors Center at Fort Stanwix in Rome, NY. This study will apply wayfinding theories to information design practice; the result is a field guide for both graphic and museum designers. This case study explains the nature of decision-making used in creation of information design. The particular project to be studied is the design of a permanent exhibit for a community historical society. Each decision to be made is documented; details are provided regarding what decisions are made, who makes the decisions, when decisions are made, and the many factors that impact the decision-making process. The case study is a description of this particular design process and a guide to the way in which decisions are made in information design. The major decisions concern the audience, content, means of wayfinding, design consistency, color, typographic parameters, size, and viewing distances. This study explores the impact these decisions had on the final exhibition design.
    • Sql Course Development Via Scaffolding, Social Constructivism, & Fantasy Football

      Thornton, Shawna (2013-12-01)
      Applying scaffolding and social constructivist concepts in online learning environments requires consideration of multimedia design and the impact it has on learning achievement. Online learning is transforming students’ experiences from “learning from technology” to “learning with technology”. Social constructivism –theoretical model in which learners make meaning from experience – and scaffold –theoretical guidelines for learning through incremental assistance – approaches aid instructors in providing effective and responsible learning environments though balancing student support and engaging challenges to help students understand that, ultimately, they learn from and teach each other. This project seeks to execute scaffolding and social constructivist techniques in a prototype online undergraduate level course on Structured Query Language, a programming language, for computer science and related field students. The prototype focuses on utilizing datasets from professional football players and utilizing Gamification aspects to create a pseudo fantasy football league. Students manage their fantasy teams and compete via increasing difficult SQL statements.
    • The Use of an Interactive Simulator to Teach Automotive Troubleshooting

      Maki, Loren (2009-12-01)
      The purpose of this project was to develop a Flash based interactive simulator to help automotive students learn how to troubleshoot automotive electrical faults. The simulator consists of a case library based on real world solved faults, background system information, and interactive diagnostic scenarios for students to solve. It was developed based on two theory based models for teaching problem solving. The first model, dubbed the R2D2 model, developed by Bonk and Zhang (2006) integrates four learning activities: Reading; Reflecting; Displaying; and Doing. The second model used was developed by Jonassen and Hung (2006) and has been named the “Troubleshooting Learning Environment” or “TLE”. The question under investigation was: What does an interactive diagnostic simulator based on the TLE and R2D2 models look like? Once developed, the simulator was evaluated through the use of a focus group consisting of automotive educators. The simulator can be viewed at: http://people.morrisville.edu/~makila/starter/start.swf