Sub-communities within this community

Recent Submissions

  • Building an Educational Website Dedicated to the Study of Violent Crime Perpetuated Through Social Media

    Maloney, Kristen; Lizardi, Ryan; First Reader; Jofre, Ana; Second Reader (2019-04)
    Computing technology has taken over every aspect of life, from business to socializing, the world is entirely dependent on the Internet. Social engineering, hacking, and phishing attempts have made protecting private information and finances more complex than ever. As new techniques and equipment are created by the day, law enforcement struggles to keep pace. With the rise of social media, online gaming, and crowdfunding, there are more outlets than ever for criminals to attempt to defraud unsuspecting victims. This study serves to examine what makes cybercrime so attractive, the types of attacks and targets, and the role of law enforcement in investigating crimes; with on how social media networks like Facebook or Twitter have allowed crime to cross into real life. Utilizing this information, I have created an educational website for use in public or academic spaces to make cybersecurity information accessible. This flexible platform can be updated in real time as more information becomes available – allowing for new risk and solutions to be added.
  • Using Video Tutorials to Aid Coherence of Failed or Unchangeable Designs

    Griggs, Danielle; Stam, Kathryn; Thesis Advisor; Lizardi, Ryan; Second Reader (2019-05)
    Information design exists to convey information to users. When users have trouble understanding or using the information, the design has failed its primary purpose (Katz 17). When a design has failed and cannot be adjusted, the logical next step is to create another design to assist in using the first design. Tutorials are the perfect opportunity to help fill the void in a failed design. With the assistance of video and/or screen sharing technology, designers can create guided step-by-step instruction to assist users in navigating a process. This paper will examine how video tutorials can fill the void in coherence and transparency left by a failed design, including methods for creating successful video tutorials and an examination of equipment necessary for recording.
  • Validating Network Security with Predictive Analytics: A Design Guide to Bridge Stochastic Modeling into a Computationally Intelligent Dashboard

    Galavotti, Christopher R.; Kahn, Russell; Thesis Advisor; Stam, Kathryn; Second Reader (2019-05)
    Network posture has historically relied on traditional and reactionary methods for protection. These methods most commonly consist of network segmentation, intrusion detection systems, intrusion prevention systems, and signature-based detections. However, these traditional security platforms have proven to be an inadequate deterrent to the complex threat matrix that we currently find ourselves in. It is only through computational intelligence that we can truly identify potential intrusion areas and network abnormalities. This study presents a path forward for industry professionals on how to implement this computational approach into their network security platforms, particularly through stochastic modeling and simulation. Acknowledging the complex nature of this approach, a human-centered design methodology is also outlined on how to integrate this science into the enterprise via a predictive analytical dashboard.
  • A Genetic Algorithm for Locating Acceptable Structure Models of Systems (Reconstructability Analysis)

    Heath, Joshua; Cavallo, Roger; Advisor; Reale, Michael; Reviewer; Sengupta, Saumendra; Reviewer (2018-05)
    The emergence of the field of General Systems Theory (GST) can be best attributed to the belief that all systems, irrespective of context, share simple, organizational principles capable of being mathematically modeled with any of many forms of abstraction. Structure  modeling is a well‐developed aspect of GST specializing in analyzing the structure of a system ‐ that is, the interactions between the attributes of a system. These interactions, while intuitive in smaller systems, become increasingly difficult to comprehend as the number of measurable attributes of a system increases. To combat this, one may approach an overall system by analyzing its various subsystems and, potentially, reconstruct properties of that system using  knowledge gained from considering a collection of these subsystems (a structure model). In situations where the overall system cannot be fully reconstructed based on a given structure model, the benefits and detriments associated with using such a model should both be considered. For example, while a model may be simpler to understand, or require less storage space in memory than the system as a whole, all information regarding that system may not be inferable from that model. As systems grow in size, determining the acceptability of every meaningful structure model of a system in order tofind the most acceptable becomes exceedingly resource-intensive. In this thesis, a measure of the memory requirements associated with storing a system or a set of subsystems (a structure model) is defined and is used in defining an objective measure of the acceptability of a structure as a representation of an overall system. A Genetic Algorithm for Locating Acceptable Structures (GALAS) is then outlined, with this acceptability criterion serving as an optimizable fitness function. The goal of this heuristic is to search the set of all meaningful structure models, without the need for exhaustively generating each, and produce those that are the most acceptable, based on predefined acceptability criteria. 
  • Enhancing Community and Creating Unity Using a Mobile Application

    Ellis, Kayla; Stam, Kathryn; Thesis Advisor; Lizardi, Ryan; Second Reader (SUNY Polytechnic Institute, 2019-05)
    This project involves the creation of a prototype mobile application for a multi-cultural community center in Utica, NY, the Midtown Utica Community Center (MUCC). It is an inclusive multicultural and refugee-friendly space for members to come and join in on different programs, activities, and services that the center offers. Hundreds of families utilize the open and welcoming space on a weekly basis and it serves as a place for them to congregate and come together. It is a place filled with heritage and members who are friends, but see themselves as family. This is where the idea for a mobile application stemmed from. This mobile application would be used by both members and nonmembers of the community center, as well as the staff, executive board, and volunteers. The goal of the application is to enhance the sense of community and bring a feeling of unity to the members of the organization. In this unique scenario, since the application is being built for a community center, the sense of “community” is already present—the utilization of technology such as a mobile application will only enhance, build upon, and create a sense of unity for the current and soon-to-be members of this organization. For the most part, members of this center are made up of various youth age groups. In this paper, I will explore research that has been conducted on the use of mobile technology and applications by youth as well as ways to keep them engaged and interacting with an application on a daily basis. Another area for exploration is the idea of using the application to an application on a daily basis. Another area for exploration is the idea of using the application to be in two places at once, to communicate with peers even though they may not physically be present at the center.
  • The Synchronological Charting of The Evolution of Electronic Communications

    Conklin, Donald; Kahn, Russell; Thesis Adviser; Stam, Kathryn; Second Reader (SUNY Polytechnic Institute, 2019-05)
    From 1850s to the present time, electronic communications have been evolving from the analog transmission of harmonics over a singular wire connected to boxes with a single hole for transmitting and receiving to texting, FaceTime, Facebook, and twitter. This evolution did not follow a direct path from A to B; instead, it took a winding and interlocking path. This path is represented via a timeline that textually analyzes the data collected, and through graphical interpretation, depicts the history of the path. With this one should be able to see the growth of the enterprises through history, which is shown horizontally, as well as the different variables that affected their growth along the way, depicted vertically. Both of these variables are depicted on one chart, from the same vantage point. This timeline not only shows the path of growth of the technology and its enterprises but also the interrelations of the different enterprises and how either technology, politics, or geographic presence influenced this swath. The online interactive Prezi timeline “Evolution of Electronic Communications” referenced in this abstract can be found at https://prezi.com/vt9673mvbqsa/evolution-of-electronic-communications/ .
  • Designing an Educational Game Application for Learning Receptive Fingerspelling

    Bustos-Estefan, Jorge; Kahn, Russell; Thesis Adviser; Yucel, Ibrahim; Second Reader (SUNY Polytechnic Institute, 2019-05)
    The goal of this project is to design an educational game application to learn receptive fingerspelling. The design product is presented as a series of screenshots and diagrams in these pages and also as an online interactive prototype through which the user interface (UI) and user experience (UX) are demonstrated. Current research in the field of game design recommends using game design frameworks to help designers in their undertaking as well as to facilitate discussion of game design among designers, researchers, critics, and players. The MDA framework (aka mechanics, dynamics, and aesthetics) was applied when designing this app. Instructional design concepts were examined and evaluated on how to foster the pedagogy of the educational game. Active learning, tangential learning, and a range of cognitive learning principles were integrated into the design. Universal principles of design were also implemented. The result is the design of an app containing a section involving gameplay as well as two sections that do not involve gameplay, one for learning the manual alphabet and one for practice drills.
  • Design of an Online Technical Communication Course Using the Open SUNY Online Course Quality Rubric

    Brierley, Sean; Stam, Kathryn; Thesis Advisor; Lizardi, Ryan; Second Reader (SUNY Polytechnic Institute, 2019-05)
    This project is a one-semester, online technical communication class for undergraduates at a four-year university. The audience includes students who are taking the class to learn about writing but who generally have majors unrelated to technical communication. The online class will use best practices in course delivery and will support a constructivist theory of learning, based on peer-to-peer, as well as peer-to-instructor, interaction. Writing and communication best practices will make extensive use of revision based on peer and instructor review. Importantly, this design of the class will make use of the Open SUNY Online Course Quality Review (OSCQR) Rubric and Process (“About OSCQR,” n.d.). The intent of this project is to deliver a live product that can be accessed through the Internet and used out of box with little revision almost immediately. A representative, functional Moodle class will be available at https://brierleynet.com, and this will be ready for roll-out before the fall 2019 semester.
  • E-Orientation for Clinton Community College

    Aubrey, Jessica (SUNY Polytechnic Institute, 2019-05)
    Clinton Community College has faced continued declining enrollments for the last five years, resulting in the College’s active pursuit of proven student retention mechanisms to assist with enrollment stabilization. The College has decided to create an online orientation module in Moodle to improve the “new student experience” and support a smooth onboarding process that effectively provides students with information critical to their success as well as aids in their ability to better navigate the college experience. In addition, the college seeks to encourage student self-awareness, learning skills and familiarity with the online learning platform. These intentionally designed interactions delivered via an E-orientation model that employs scholarly proven information design, constructivist and social constructivist theories will ensure the College’s new E-Orientation will foster student success and retention.
  • SECURITY CHALLENGES IN SDN IMPLEMENTATION

    Patil, Pradnya; Hash, Larry; Advisor; White, Joshua; Reviewer; Tekeoglu, Ali, Reviewer (2018-05)
    This study analyzes how security challenges caused by data and control layer separation in the SDN, such as Denial of Service attacks and unauthorized access attacks, limit SDN deployment. This study also offers network engineers’ views on preventing those security issues and whether implementing SDN is a good idea in the first place. This study was conducted in order to answer three questions: 1. How does data and control layer separation in SDN cause DoS and unauthorized access attacks? 2. What are the best practices and measures to minimize such security threats from the engineer’s point of view? 3. Do security threats at the lower layer affect the decision to implement SDN? These questions were answered by reviewing research papers and interviewing engineers from the telecommunication field. DoS and unauthorized access attacks are due to vulnerabilities in OpenFlow, SDN switches and SDN controllers. Table 6 presents solutions for preventing DoS and unauthorized access attacks. Most of the network engineers said SDN should be implemented based on cost, limited risk, customers’ positive views, and company projects, despite the current security challenges.
  • Password Habits of Security Literate Individuals

    Mahesh, Namrata; Hash, Larry; Advisor; Marsh, John; Reviewer; White, Joshua; Reviewer (2018-05)
    In the age of the Internet, the common user has accounts on multiple websites. Basic account authentication has a username and a password. While username may be common knowledge, passwords are secret, and it is important to use good password habits. Security literate internet users, i.e, students, faculty, professionals in the IT industry are expected to know better than to use bad password habits. But that may not always be the case. This thesis aims to test the hypothesis that security literate internet users use bad password habits despite knowing better, and then proceeds to understand the underlying factors behind these habits through a survey. The survey consisted of questions about basic password habits. The responses were analyzed for better insights
  • OBJECT ORIENTED ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK SIMULATOR IN TEXT AND SYMBOL RECOGNITION

    Piszcz, Alan; Ishaq, Naseem; Advisor; Novillo, Jorge E; Reviewer; Sengupta, Saumendra; Reviewer (1993)
    Objected oriented languages and artificial neural networks are new areas of research and development. This thesis investigates the application of artificial neural networks using an object oriented C++ backpropagation simulator. The application domain investigated is hand printed text and engineering symbol recognition. An object oriented approach to the simulator allows other simulator paradigms to reuse a large body of the object classes developed for this particular application. The review and implementation of image feature extraction methodologies is another area researched in this paper. Four feature techniques are researched, developed, applied and tested, using digits, upper case alphabet characters and engineering symbol images. Final implementation and testing of the feature extraction methods with a baseline technique is analyzed for applicability in the domain of hand printed text and engineering symbols
  • Creating an effective online course and community with best practices from the disciplines of Visual Design, User Experience and online learning experiences.

    Spirizzi, Bianca; Kahn, Russell; Thesis Adviser; Stam, Kathryn; Second Reader (2018-05)
    (Introduction) Online Learning requires learners to take an extra step. No one is forcing them to show up, participate or contribute. Creating an online learning space that encourages students to engage is the main goal of an online course. This can be helped along greatly with the correct application of best practices from the fields of Visual Design, User Experience and online learning. By setting up an active learning course structure based on Bloom’s taxonomy, online courses become much more engaging. This, along with a Critiquing segment will be applied to this online course prototype. By offering a guide on how to critique and always having a reference available for students when they need to critique create is a good rule to follow for this online course. Course will combine quilting and design into each lesson.
  • Assessing a Multi-Electron Beam Application Approach for Semiconductor Process Metrology

    Mukhtar, Maseeh; Thiel, Bradley; Dissertation Committee Chair; Bello, Abner; Dissertation Committee; Diebold, Alain; Dissertation Committee; Cady, Nathan; Dissertation Committee; Geer, Robert; Dissertation Committee; Sung, Woongje; Dissertation Committee (2018)
    Radical and disruptive technological approaches regularly require experimental prototypes be built, which is difficult to justify considering their oft-prohibitive requirements in terms of financial and/or time commitments. It is also frequently the situation that use cases for new technologies are not entirely worked out precisely which in turn make it even more difficult to build prototypes but the analysis of simulation data sets from virtual samples can be used to predict sensitivity to the devised signal, detection limits, and impact of design rules and material sets. The results can thus be used to guide prototype design. The aim of this work is to develop and demonstrate a predictive approach to technology assessment and prototype design. This work will focus on two such disruptive technology concepts: electron beam defect inspection and critical dimension measurement. These two concepts are based on the transfer from conventional process metrology technologies i.e., brightfield inspection and optical critical dimension scatterometry to multi-electron beam approaches. Here, a multi-scale modeling approach is used to simulate data streams nominally generated by virtual tools inspecting virtual wafers. To this end, Java Monte Carlo Simulator for Secondary Electrons (JMONSEL) simulations are used to generate expected imaging responses of chosen test cases of patterns and defects with ability to vary parameters for beam energy, spot size, pixel size, and/or defect material and form factor. The patterns are representative of the design rules for aggressively-scaled FinFET-type designs. With these simulated images and resulting shot noise, a signal-to-noise framework is developed, which relates to defect detection probabilities. Additionally, with this infrastructure the effect of detection chain noise and frequency dependent system response can be made, allowing for targeting of best recipe parameters for multi-electron beam inspection validation experiments. Ultimately, leading to insights into how such parameters will impact tool design, including necessary doses for defect detection and estimations of scanning speeds for achieving high throughput for high-volume manufacturing. Simulated images are also executed for measurement of critical dimensions of the abovementioned class of FinFETs. Similarly, validation experiments for multi-electron critical dimension measurements may use the information extracted for development of volume manufacturing metrology systems.
  • Using Social Media to Create a Collaborative Learning Environment in a Graphic Arts Environment

    Tooley, Shannon; Lizardi, Ryan; First Reader; Schneider, Steven; Second Reader (2018-05)
    The purpose of this study is to examine how social media has led to a creation of collaborative learning environments. The technology of graphic arts is rapidly growing as is graphic arts education. With the rapid development of innovations and technology in graphic arts applications and software, the best methods to teach graphic arts education must keep pace to provide creative learning environments. This will best serve the needs for students studying graphic arts. A concern in the area of graphic arts education may be the utilization of online platforms. While online learning is growing, it may not be the best method for students to learn and develop the necessary skills related to graphic arts due to the limited personal interactions between student and the graphic arts instructor. One area to be explored is the use of social media as a collaborative learning environment for graphic arts education.
  • Nanoscale Schottky Barrier Visualization Utilizing Computational Modeling and Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy

    Nolting, Westly; LaBella, Vincent; Advisor (2018-05)
    Understanding the properties and performance of semiconductor interfaces on the nanoscale advances semiconductor device technology which has had tremendous impact on nearly all aspects of our daily lives. Investigating the nanoscale fluctuations in the electrostatics of metal-semiconductor, or Schottky, interfaces is crucial. However, techniques for directly measuring the electrostatics at an interface are limited. Current state-of-the-art finFETs use metal-semiconductor silicides, such as Ti-Si/Si, for Schottky source-drain contacts. Studying the underlying physics of the Schottky barrier interface of silicides and other metal-semiconductor systems is critical for measuring the Schottky barrier accurately, which can be accomplished with ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM), a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) based technique. In this work, the visualization of the interface to nanoscale dimensions is enhanced by computational modelling of threshold histograms acquired by the BEEM measurement technique. Modelling using a kinetic Monte-Carlo approach is utilized to simulate the distributions of barrier heights that includes effects from the interface and transport of the hot electrons as well as indication of a multi-barrier heights present at the interface. The aid of this modelling enables the discovery of several underlying properties of the interface. Analyzing the parameters of the modelling and comparing to measured data provides detailed insight into the effects that both electron scattering and incomplete silicide formation in W/Si(001) and WSi2/Si(001) have upon the transport of electrons through these structures, which is difficult to detect with conventional current-voltage measurements. The modelling also includes simulation of multiple barriers present at the interface due to the intermixing of similar metals such as Au and Ag at the interface of Si(001) In this regard, Schottky barrier visualization as the combination of histograms, mapping, and modelling provides a new insight into the local nanoscale phenomenon of the Schottky barrier. This thesis investigates the modelling of these metal-semiconductor systems and uses modelling to look at metal thickness dependent effects on the Schottky barrier from Fermi-level pinning in Au/Cr-Si/Si(001) and Au/Cr-Si/Si(111) silicide.
  • Applying Game Learning Principles to Analyze and Identify Improvements for Scuba Training Simulations

    Schaller, Shaun; Yucel, Ibrahim; Thesis Advisor; Kahn, Russell; Second Reader (2018-04)
    The purpose of this project was to analyze whether existing simulations for scuba diving are effective training tools, and to further develop prototype mockups that demonstrate how a simulation embedded with important scuba concepts and procedures can create an effective learning environment. Academic literature is reviewed relating to virtual reality experiences, simulations in training applications, motivational factors for the use of simulations in education, and strategies to embed learning into game simulations. This study uses James Paul Gee’s learning principles for good games (2013) to analyze the scuba simulation game, “Infinite Scuba.” Gee’s learning principles are then applied to develop a series of simulation mockups in which players learn important scuba procedures including: planning a dive, underwater navigation, and underwater communication. The question under investigation is: “What features are needed in a game simulation to be an effective teaching tool and learning experience for open water scuba divers.”
  • Employing User-Centered Design to Accelerate the Construction of a Business Intelligence Dashboard

    Obermaier, Joseph F.; Stam, Kathryn; Thesis Advisor; Lizardi, Ryan; Second Reader (2018)
    Providing real-time data to decision makers has become a key component in the management of complex systems. The most common visualization for this type of data is the electronic dashboard, which, like the instrument panel on an airplane, displays critical data in a well-designed, easily understood, manner. The challenge for designers of such systems today is not just to find a way to effectively communicate information to decision makers, but to do so in an environment that demands an ever more rapid development cycle. The intent of this paper is to review several studies and present a hypothetical project with an eye toward uncovering just how user-centered design can afford a designer an opportunity to develop such an intranet dashboard at an accelerated pace.
  • Creating a browser extension to improve PubMed record full text linking

    Locascio, Jill K.; Kahn, Russell; Thesis Adviser; Yucel, Ibrahim; Second Reader (2018)
    PubMed is a free search engine developed and maintained by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) which searches the MEDLINE database of references and abstracts on life sciences and biomedical topics. As such it is a valuable search tool for researchers in the health sciences. In my work as a Digital and Technical Services librarian at SUNY College of Optometry, I have registered complaints from frustrated users seeking to connect to full text articles from PubMed. They have reported finding the process confusing and containing too many steps which disrupt their search process. This project took a critical look at PubMed’s linking service, LinkOut, used information design theory to propose improvements, and implemented those improvements through the design and development of a browser extension which will be presented to the SUNY Optometry community. This paper describes the process taken to complete this project.
  • Podcast in a Box: A low cost and effective tool to produce compelling educational videos.

    Ward, James (2018-05)
    The current generation is the media generation, devoting more than a fifty percent or more of each day to media. As media devices become increasingly portable, and as it spreads even further through young our environment, from their schools to their cars, media messages will become an even more ubiquitous presence in an already media-saturated world. Turning our attention as educators to this fact requires harnessing the power of educational video for teaching and learning. Video has become an important part of education. It is integrated as part of traditional courses, serves as a cornerstone of many courses, and is often the main information delivery mechanism in MOOCs. Several meta-analyses have shown that technology can enhance learning , and multiple studies have shown that video, specifically, can be a highly effective educational tool. In order for video to serve as a productive part of a learning experience, however, it is important that the instructor has the correct tools for video design and implementation. This tool must be cost effective, easy to use, and be able to produce interesting, high quality video. My Podcast in a Box fills in this void.

View more