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dc.contributor.advisorGarneau, Danielle
dc.contributor.authorMoriarty, Melissa
dc.contributor.authorLee, Erin
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Sadie
dc.contributor.authorBuksa, Brandon
dc.contributor.authorNiekrewicz, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, Jason
dc.contributor.authorChaskey, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-02T17:18:21Z
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-22T14:33:13Z
dc.date.available2018-04-02T17:18:21Z
dc.date.available2020-06-22T14:33:13Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/894
dc.descriptionStudent poster, Center for Earth and Environmental Science, SUNY Plattsburghen_US
dc.description.abstractMicroplastic is defined as particulatefragments, fibers, films, foams, pellets, and beads. Microplastic pollution was first documented in the 1970s and interest has grown from initial characterization, to effects within marine and freshwater food chains, ultimately impacting human health. Due to their small size, porosity, and density variation, microplastics often escape wastewater treatment processing (WWTP). Commencing in 2015, we surveyed WWTP post-treatment effluent (N = 59) from the city of Plattsburgh, NY and beginning in fall 2016 from St Albans, VT (N = 29), Ticonderoga, NY (N = 23), and Burlington, VT (N = 9). Effluent samples were collected and digested using wet peroxide oxidation methods, followed by microscopic characterization based on type and size. Plant specifications yielded varied microplastic trends in quantity and type, specifically Plattsburgh largely emitted fibers and fragments, St. Albans emitted a majority of foam, Ticonderoga emitted mostly fibers, and Burlington emitted a majority of fragments. Estimated microplastics released per day ranged from St. Albans (30,268), Plattsburgh (14,105), Burlington (16,843), to Ticonderoga (7,841). Microplastics are an emerging concern for aquatic life as they can biomagnify and adsorb harmful chemicals which bioaccumulate up the food chain. They have been found to impair feeding and reduce survival in many aquatic species. This research further documents wastewater treatment plants as a significant source of microplastics entering Lake Champlain and serves as a basis for further microplastic studies in the Lake Champlain watershed. As plants are not designed to capture these small particulate, consumer behavior must evolve to reduce this pollution threat.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectmicroplasticsen_US
dc.subjectwastewater treatment plantsen_US
dc.subjecteffluenten_US
dc.subjectpollutionen_US
dc.subjectLake Champlainen_US
dc.subjectfibersen_US
dc.subjectfragmentsen_US
dc.subjectfoamsen_US
dc.subjectbiomagnify in organismsen_US
dc.subjectbioaccumulate toxinsen_US
dc.titleMicroplastic Pollution: A Survey of Wastewater Effluent in the Lake Champlain Basinen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-06-22T14:33:13Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Plattsburgh


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