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dc.contributor.authorEdwards, A C
dc.contributor.authorDocherty, A R
dc.contributor.authorMoscati, A
dc.contributor.authorBigdeli, T B
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, R E
dc.contributor.authorWebb, B T
dc.contributor.authorBacanu, S-A
dc.contributor.authorHettema, J M
dc.contributor.authorFlint, J
dc.contributor.authorKendler, K S
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-22T16:54:37Z
dc.date.available2023-02-22T16:54:37Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-03
dc.identifier.citationEdwards AC, Docherty AR, Moscati A, Bigdeli TB, Peterson RE, Webb BT, Bacanu SA, Hettema JM, Flint J, Kendler KS. Polygenic risk for severe psychopathology among Europeans is associated with major depressive disorder in Han Chinese women. Psychol Med. 2018 Apr;48(5):777-789. doi: 10.1017/S0033291717002148. Epub 2017 Oct 3. PMID: 28969721; PMCID: PMC5843532.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1469-8978
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291717002148
dc.identifier.pmid28969721
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/8388
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies have demonstrated that several major psychiatric disorders are influenced by shared genetic factors. This shared liability may influence clinical features of a given disorder (e.g. severity, age at onset). However, findings have largely been limited to European samples; little is known about the consistency of shared genetic liability across ethnicities.
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between polygenic risk for several major psychiatric diagnoses and major depressive disorder (MDD) was examined in a sample of unrelated Han Chinese women. Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) were generated using European discovery samples and tested in the China, Oxford, and VCU Experimental Research on Genetic Epidemiology [CONVERGE (maximum N = 10 502)], a sample ascertained for recurrent MDD. Genetic correlations between discovery phenotypes and MDD were also assessed. In addition, within-case characteristics were examined.
dc.description.abstractEuropean-based polygenic risk for several major psychiatric disorder phenotypes was significantly associated with the MDD case status in CONVERGE. Risk for clinically significant indicators (neuroticism and subjective well-being) was also associated with case-control status. The variance accounted for by PRS for both psychopathology and for well-being was similar to estimates reported for within-ethnicity comparisons in European samples. However, European-based PRS were largely unassociated with CONVERGE family history, clinical characteristics, or comorbidity.
dc.description.abstractThe shared genetic liability across severe forms of psychopathology is largely consistent across European and Han Chinese ethnicities, with little attenuation of genetic signal relative to within-ethnicity analyses. The overall absence of associations between PRS for other disorders and within-MDD variation suggests that clinical characteristics of MDD may arise due to contributions from ethnicity-specific factors and/or pathoplasticity.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/psychological-medicine/article/abs/polygenic-risk-for-severe-psychopathology-among-europeans-is-associated-with-major-depressive-disorder-in-han-chinese-women/2D2361E13A6E8FD8D00D1D9F8D6AEB29en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectMajor depressionen_US
dc.subjectpolygenic risken_US
dc.subjectpsychopathologyen_US
dc.subjecttrans-ethnicen_US
dc.titlePolygenic risk for severe psychopathology among Europeans is associated with major depressive disorder in Han Chinese women.en_US
dc.typeArticle/Reviewen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePsychological medicineen_US
dc.source.volume48
dc.source.issue5
dc.source.beginpage777
dc.source.endpage789
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited Kingdom
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited Kingdom
dc.source.countryUnited Kingdom
dc.source.countryUnited Kingdom
dc.source.countryEngland
dc.description.versionAMen_US
refterms.dateFOA2023-02-22T16:54:38Z
html.description.abstractPrevious studies have demonstrated that several major psychiatric disorders are influenced by shared genetic factors. This shared liability may influence clinical features of a given disorder (e.g. severity, age at onset). However, findings have largely been limited to European samples; little is known about the consistency of shared genetic liability across ethnicities.
html.description.abstractThe relationship between polygenic risk for several major psychiatric diagnoses and major depressive disorder (MDD) was examined in a sample of unrelated Han Chinese women. Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) were generated using European discovery samples and tested in the China, Oxford, and VCU Experimental Research on Genetic Epidemiology [CONVERGE (maximum N = 10 502)], a sample ascertained for recurrent MDD. Genetic correlations between discovery phenotypes and MDD were also assessed. In addition, within-case characteristics were examined.
html.description.abstractEuropean-based polygenic risk for several major psychiatric disorder phenotypes was significantly associated with the MDD case status in CONVERGE. Risk for clinically significant indicators (neuroticism and subjective well-being) was also associated with case-control status. The variance accounted for by PRS for both psychopathology and for well-being was similar to estimates reported for within-ethnicity comparisons in European samples. However, European-based PRS were largely unassociated with CONVERGE family history, clinical characteristics, or comorbidity.
html.description.abstractThe shared genetic liability across severe forms of psychopathology is largely consistent across European and Han Chinese ethnicities, with little attenuation of genetic signal relative to within-ethnicity analyses. The overall absence of associations between PRS for other disorders and within-MDD variation suggests that clinical characteristics of MDD may arise due to contributions from ethnicity-specific factors and/or pathoplasticity.
dc.description.institutionSUNY Downstateen_US
dc.description.departmentPsychiatry and Behavioral Sciencesen_US
dc.description.departmentInstitute for Genomics in Healthen_US
dc.description.degreelevelN/Aen_US
dc.identifier.journalPsychological medicine


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