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dc.contributor.authorKsinan, Albert J
dc.contributor.authorSu, Jinni
dc.contributor.authorAliev, Fazil
dc.contributor.authorDick, Danielle M
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-15T19:18:43Z
dc.date.available2023-02-15T19:18:43Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-26
dc.identifier.citationKsinan AJ, Su J, Aliev F; Spit for Science Workgroup; Dick DM. Unpacking Genetic Risk Pathways for College Student Alcohol Consumption: The Mediating Role of Impulsivity. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2019 Oct;43(10):2100-2110. doi: 10.1111/acer.14157. Epub 2019 Aug 26. PMID: 31373688; PMCID: PMC6779491.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1530-0277
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/acer.14157
dc.identifier.pmid31373688
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/8364
dc.description.abstractThe period of college represents a particularly risky developmental stage with regard to alcohol use, as college students engage in more risky drinking behaviors than their noncollege peers, and such problematic alcohol use is associated with far-reaching negative consequences. Existing findings from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) indicate that alcohol consumption has a complex polygenic etiology. Currently, there is a lack of studies examining genetic risk for alcohol consumption using polygenic risk scores (PRS) in college samples. In this study, we examined whether alcohol-specific and risky behavior-related PRS were longitudinally associated with alcohol consumption among college students and whether this effect might be partially mediated by impulsivity domains.
dc.description.abstractThe sample included n = 2,385 European ancestry (EA) and n = 1,153 African ancestry (AA) college students assessed over the course of 4 years. To indicate genetic risk, 2 PRS were created based on recent large-scale GWAS: alcohol consumption (Liu et al., 2019) -drinks per week (DPW)-PRS and risky behaviors (Linnér et al., 2019) -RISK-PRS. The main outcome was alcohol consumption, measured across 4 waves of follow-up data. The UPPS-P impulsivity subscales were examined as mediators of the genetic effect on alcohol consumption.
dc.description.abstractThe results from structural equation modeling showed that among EA students, both DPW-PRS and RISK-PRS had significant positive effects on alcohol consumption above and beyond UPPS dimensions and control variables. RISK-PRS explained larger portion of variance in alcohol consumption than DPW-PRS. RISK-PRS showed a significant indirect effect on alcohol consumption through sensation seeking and lack of perseverance; no significant indirect effect of DPW-PRS was found. No significant association of either PRS or alcohol consumption was found for AA participants.
dc.description.abstractThe current results found that PRS related to more broadly defined risky behaviors predicted alcohol consumption across college years and that this association was partially mediated via dimensions of impulsivity.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acer.14157en_US
dc.rights© 2019 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAlcohol Consumptionen_US
dc.subjectCollegeen_US
dc.subjectImpulsivityen_US
dc.subjectPolygenic Risk Scoresen_US
dc.subjectRisky Behaviorsen_US
dc.titleUnpacking Genetic Risk Pathways for College Student Alcohol Consumption: The Mediating Role of Impulsivity.en_US
dc.typeArticle/Reviewen_US
dc.source.journaltitleAlcoholism, clinical and experimental researchen_US
dc.source.volume43
dc.source.issue10
dc.source.beginpage2100
dc.source.endpage2110
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryInternational
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryEngland
dc.description.versionAMen_US
refterms.dateFOA2023-02-15T19:18:43Z
html.description.abstractThe period of college represents a particularly risky developmental stage with regard to alcohol use, as college students engage in more risky drinking behaviors than their noncollege peers, and such problematic alcohol use is associated with far-reaching negative consequences. Existing findings from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) indicate that alcohol consumption has a complex polygenic etiology. Currently, there is a lack of studies examining genetic risk for alcohol consumption using polygenic risk scores (PRS) in college samples. In this study, we examined whether alcohol-specific and risky behavior-related PRS were longitudinally associated with alcohol consumption among college students and whether this effect might be partially mediated by impulsivity domains.
html.description.abstractThe sample included n = 2,385 European ancestry (EA) and n = 1,153 African ancestry (AA) college students assessed over the course of 4 years. To indicate genetic risk, 2 PRS were created based on recent large-scale GWAS: alcohol consumption (Liu et al., 2019) -drinks per week (DPW)-PRS and risky behaviors (Linnér et al., 2019) -RISK-PRS. The main outcome was alcohol consumption, measured across 4 waves of follow-up data. The UPPS-P impulsivity subscales were examined as mediators of the genetic effect on alcohol consumption.
html.description.abstractThe results from structural equation modeling showed that among EA students, both DPW-PRS and RISK-PRS had significant positive effects on alcohol consumption above and beyond UPPS dimensions and control variables. RISK-PRS explained larger portion of variance in alcohol consumption than DPW-PRS. RISK-PRS showed a significant indirect effect on alcohol consumption through sensation seeking and lack of perseverance; no significant indirect effect of DPW-PRS was found. No significant association of either PRS or alcohol consumption was found for AA participants.
html.description.abstractThe current results found that PRS related to more broadly defined risky behaviors predicted alcohol consumption across college years and that this association was partially mediated via dimensions of impulsivity.
dc.description.institutionSUNY Downstateen_US
dc.description.departmentPsychiatry and Behavioral Sciencesen_US
dc.description.departmentInstitute for Genomics in Healthen_US
dc.description.degreelevelN/Aen_US
dc.identifier.journalAlcoholism, clinical and experimental research


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© 2019 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.
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