• Reading from an Electronic Reading Device versus Hardcopy Text

      Hue, Jennifer E. (2013-06-24)
      The use of electronic reading devices has become more prevalent. Many individuals of all ages are using personal electronic readers (e.g., Kindle, Nook, E-Reader) in place of hardcopy printed materials. Previous work in our laboratory has demonstrated that symptoms when reading from a computer screen are significantly greater than those experienced when reading printed text. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to examine both symptoms and task performance when reading from a Kindle e-reading device, and to compare the findings with those from hardcopy, printed materials.
    • The Relationship Between Meibomian Gland Morphology, Dry Eye Disease, and Electronic Device Use in Pediatric Patients

      Ribolla, Sofia (2022)
      "Purpose: The purpose of this systematic study was to establish preliminary comparisons of various morphological and clinical parameters between dry eye and normal subjects in a pediatric cohort. Methods: Children aged 5-17 were recruited for the study with no previous clinical diagnosis of dry eye disease (DED) or meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). Diagnostic criteria for DED consisted of positive scoring on at least two of three components; subjective symptoms, abnormal tear function, and vital staining. All subjects completed SPEED questionnaires to assess dry eye symptoms; scores above 5 indicated positive symptomology. Tear film and ocular surface integrity were inspected using fluorescein and lissamine green dye with slit lamp miscroscopy. Corneal fluorescein, as well as temporal and nasal conjunctival lissamine green staining was graded from 1-4 (0=no staining; 4=coalesced). A staining score of more than 4 points across all 3 sections indicated positive vital staining. Abnormal tear function was defined by a TBUT ≤5s. Meibomian gland morphology, lipid layer thickness, and blink patterns were evaluated with the use of a Lipiview Interferometer. The 5-point meiboscale for gland atrophy was used for dropout grading, while tortuosity was defined by number of glands with ≥45° angles. Tear volume assessment was completed with phenol red test. Questionnaires administered to both the child and family member were used to assess electronic device usage in order to screen for possible associations with average daily screen time and aforementioned parameters. Results: A total of 24 subjects participated in the study. Dry eye was found in 41.7% of the subjects. Presence of meibomian gland dropout and tortuosity were 70.8% and 87.5% respectively. Dropout was significantly higher in the dry eye group (p=0.016), although tortuosity was similar between both groups (p=0.93). Tear breakup times were significantly lower in the dry eye group (5.30s vs 9.66s; p<0.001) along with total staining scores (8.00 vs. 3.21; p=0.043). Blink behavior and measurements of lipid layer thickness (LLT) did not vary between the two groups; partial blink ratios were 0.62 and 0.67 for DED and normal groups respectively (p=0.76), and lipid layer thicknesses were 55.9nm and 57.43nm (p=0.84). Electronic device use did not vary significantly between the two groups (p=0.99). Screen time was significantly correlated with higher rate of partial blinks (r=0.84). Higher lipid layer thickness significantly predicted higher partial blink fraction in the left eye (p=0.39) and approached significance in the right eye (p=0.08). Conclusion: The present study provides a current baseline data on ocular surface characteristics and meibomian gland anatomy in healthy children with clinically dry eye vs. those without dry eye. Our results indicate that MGD and DED are highly inter-related at a much earlier age than previously acknowledged, and that the significant rise in pediatric variations of DED represent a worthwhile cause for investigation into long-term risk factors for disease progression. Better understanding of baseline ocular surface and tear film characteristics will be crucial to identify the impact increasingly prevalent risk factors, such as visual device use, myopia interventions, and other changing environmental factors might have on the pediatric population."
    • The Effect of Multifocal Contact Lenses on Accomodation and Phoria in a Pediatric Population

      Gong, Celia (2017)
      The increasing prevalence of the use of distance-centered multifocal (MF) contact lenses as a method of myopia control in the pediatric population calls for a better understanding of binocularity and accommodation in children wearing these lenses. This was a prospective, randomized, crossover, single visit study that enrolled myopic children with normal accommodation and binocular vision and no history of myopia control treatment. All subjects were fitted with Coopervision Biofinity single vision (SV) and MF (+2.50D center distance add) contact lenses. Accommodative responses (photorefraction) and phorias (Modified Thorington) were measured at 4 distances (>3m, 100cm, 40cm, 25cm). Secondary measures included high and low contrast logMAR acuity, accommodative amplitude, and accommodative facility. Differences between MF and SV contact lenses were analyzed using repeated measures regression and paired t-tests. A total of 16 subjects, aged 10-15 years, completed the study. There was a small decrease in high (SV: -0.08, MF: +0.01) and low illumination (SV:-0.03, MF: +0.08) (both p<0.01) visual acuity, and contrast sensitivity (SV: 2.0 log units, MF: 1.9, p=0.015) with MFs. Subjects were more exophoric at 40cm (SV: -0.41 Δ, MF: -2.06 Δ) and 25cm (SV: -0.83 Δ, MF: -4.30 Δ) (both p<0.01). With MFs, subjects had decreased accommodative responses at distance (SV: -0.04 D; MF: -0.37 D, p=0.02), 100 cm (SV: +0.37 D; MF: -0.35 D, p<0.01), 40 cm (SV: +1.82 D; MF: +0.62 D, p<0.01), and 25 cm (SV: +3.38 D; MF: +1.75 D, p<0.01). There were no significant differences in accommodative amplitude (p=0.66) or accommodative facility (p=0.54). Children wearing MF contact lenses exhibited reduced accommodative responses and more exophoria at increasingly higher accommodative demands than with SV contact lenses. This suggests that children may be relaxing their accommodation and using the positive addition or increased depth of focus from added spherical aberration of the MF lenses. Further studies are needed to evaluate other lens designs, different amounts of positive addition and aberrations, and long-term adaptation to lenses.
    • Triptolide Induces Increases in Migration via Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase-1 control of P38 and JNK MAPK Activation

      Parekh, Nili M. (2010-07-16)
      Purpose Triptolide is a Chinese herbal extract known for its anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects in treating chronic inflammatory diseases and tumors. As these attributes promote wound healing, we determined if triptolide enhances corneal wound healing by stimulating human corneal epithelial cell (HCEC) migration through changes in negative feedback regulation by a dual specificity protein Phosphatase (DUSP1) of MAPK signaling mediated effect. Methods SV40-adenovirus-immortalized HCEC were maintained in DMEM/F12. Specific shRNA for MKP-1(DUSP1) and c-jun NH2- terminal kinase JNK-1 were transduced to establish stable cell lines deficient in their respective gene expression. Scratch wound assay was employed to assess cell migration rates by taking time-dependent serial photographs of cells following wound creation. Hydroxyurea (2.5 mM) was also added to the medium to inhibit cell proliferation during the experiment. Cell Titer-Glo® luminescent cell viability assay was used to evaluate cell viability by measuring ATP production by HCEC. Results Triptolide did not affect cell viability up to 10nM and stimulated wound closure through increases in migration. Maximal responses occurred at 1nM. These increases in migration were suppressed below that in the untreated control when p38 or JNK MAPK activation was inhibited. In the MKP-1 knockdown cells, migration was stimulated relative to the control and triptolide failed to augment this response. In JNK-1 knockdown cells, migration is comparable to SV40 wild type cells. In JNK-1 knockdown cells, triptolide mediated increases are diminished completely in the presence of p38 inhibition. Conclusions Triptolide at concentrations up to 10 nM promotes cell migration without compromising cell survival. Such promotion is mediated by loss of MKP-1 negative feedback control of p38 and JNK activation. Therefore, triptolide stimulates cell migration through inhibition of MKP-1 (DUSP1) stabilization induced by kinase mediated phosphorylation.