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dc.contributor.authorLee, David A
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Jason A
dc.contributor.authorTwaddell, William S
dc.contributor.authorPalacios, Gustavo
dc.contributor.authorGill, Melissa
dc.contributor.authorLevit, Eyal
dc.contributor.authorHalperin, Alan J
dc.contributor.authorMones, Joan
dc.contributor.authorBusam, Klaus J
dc.contributor.authorSilvers, David N
dc.contributor.authorCelebi, Julide Tok
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-02T17:18:01Z
dc.date.available2022-11-02T17:18:01Z
dc.identifier.citationLee DA, Cohen JA, Twaddell WS, Palacios G, Gill M, Levit E, Halperin AJ, Mones J, Busam KJ, Silvers DN, Celebi JT. Are all melanomas the same? Spitzoid melanoma is a distinct subtype of melanoma. Cancer. 2006 Feb 15;106(4):907-13. doi: 10.1002/cncr.21686. PMID: 16421887.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0008-543X
dc.identifier.pmid16421887
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/7843
dc.description.abstractBackground: Although the majority of melanomas demonstrate high rates of mutations in B-RAF or N-RAS that result in constitutive activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase-signaling pathway, emerging data suggest molecular differences among melanoma subtypes. In this study, the authors evaluated the contribution of B-RAF and N-RAS mutations to the pathogenesis of Spitzoid melanomas. Methods: In total, 33 Spitzoid melanomas were analyzed for clinical and pathologic characteristics as well as for hot-spot mutations in the B-RAF and N-RAS genes. In the majority of patients (28 of 33 melanomas), the tumors were confined to the skin with no evidence of metastasis (average follow-up, 32.5 mos). There were five metastasizing melanomas (5 of 33 tumors) with regional or systemic spread. Results: Of 33 Spitzoid melanomas, only 1 showed the V600E mutation in the B-RAF gene (1 of 33 tumors; 3%). It was noteworthy that none of the metastatic Spitzoid melanomas (0 of 5 tumors; 0%), of which 2 resulted in fatal outcomes, demonstrated mutations in B-RAF or N-RAS. Conclusions: In contrast to the majority of cutaneous melanomas, activating hot-spot mutations in B-RAF or N-RAS were not involved in the pathogenesis of Spitzoid melanoma. These data suggested that Spitzoid melanoma is a distinct form of melanoma with unknown genes and/or signaling pathways involved in its development.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://acsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cncr.21686en_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2006 American Cancer Society.
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.titleAre all melanomas the same? Spitzoid melanoma is a distinct subtype of melanoma.en_US
dc.typeArticle/Reviewen_US
dc.source.journaltitleCanceren_US
dc.source.volume106
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage907
dc.source.endpage13
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.description.versionVoRen_US
refterms.dateFOA2022-11-02T17:18:02Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Downstateen_US
dc.description.departmentPathologyen_US
dc.description.degreelevelN/Aen_US
dc.identifier.journalCancer


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Copyright 2006 American Cancer Society.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright 2006 American Cancer Society.