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dc.contributor.authorWojotowecz, Chase
dc.contributor.authorBricetti, Luke
dc.contributor.authorAnkrah, Nana Y. D.
dc.contributor.authorGarneau, Danielle
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-07T17:47:12Z
dc.date.available2022-09-07T17:47:12Z
dc.date.issued2022-08-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/7542
dc.descriptionhttps://express.adobe.com/page/6e8k86X2JjyDd/en_US
dc.description.abstractThe role of global climate change in increasing the prevalence of amphibian disease, including chytridiomycosis, is well known. The skin microbiome is considered an important component of the amphibian immune system. Specific bacterial taxa and high skin microbial diversity are factors that are known to boost amphibian disease resistance. In this study, we explored the impact of environmental conditions on Plethodon cinereus (Red-backed Salamander) skin microbial abundance and diversity at a variety of different sites in New York’s North Country. We surveyed P. cinereus specimens from 5 sites varying in elevation and dominant vegetation type. Salamander skin microbiomes were subsequently sampled via sterile swab, plated and characterized by visual inspection of colony morphology. We performed DNA extractions and PCR to prepare samples for genetic sequencing to determine bacterial species identity. In total, 31 unique bacterial taxa were collected from the 5 sites. The highest and lowest bacterial diversity were observed at the Paul Smiths’ Visitor Interpretive Center’s Forest Ecosystem Research and Demonstration Area (FERDA) sites single tree and control silviculture stands, respectively. Beta diversity tests also indicated that the skin microbial communities at these 2 sites were most similar to each other and noticeably different from that of the Altona Flat Rock and Rugar Woods sites. These results indicate that site conditions are important determinants of P. cinereus skin microbial community diversity patterns. Although the identity of bacterial species (pathogenic, non-pathogenic) are yet to be confirmed, this study has added support to the concept that environmental conditions alter salamander skin microbiomes, which in turn can influence salamander disease resistance.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://express.adobe.com/page/6e8k86X2JjyDd/en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectred-backed salamanderen_US
dc.subjectPlethodon cinereusen_US
dc.subjectmicrobial diversityen_US
dc.subjectdiseaseen_US
dc.subjectskin microbiomeen_US
dc.subjectchytridiomycosisen_US
dc.subjectPCRen_US
dc.subjectDNA sequencingen_US
dc.subjectResearch Subject Categories::NATURAL SCIENCES::Biology::Terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecology::Terrestrial ecologyen_US
dc.titleAssessing Plethodon cinereus (Red-backed Salamander) Skin Microbiome Differences Across Northern NYen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.description.versionNAen_US
refterms.dateFOA2022-09-07T17:47:12Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Plattsburghen_US
dc.description.departmentCenter for Earth and Environmental Scienceen_US
dc.description.degreelevelN/Aen_US


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