Now showing items 21-31 of 31

    • Relative Validity and Reproducibility of a Dietary Screener Adapted for use among Pregnant Women in Dhulikhel, Nepal

      Martin, Kelly; Shah, Krupali; Shrestha, Abha; Barrett, Emily; Shrestha, Archana; Rawal, Shristi (2021)
      Objective: Culturally appropriate dietary assessments are lacking in many low-income countries including Nepal. Here we examined the reproducibility and validity of a dietary screener which was translated and adapted to assess diet quality among pregnant Nepalese women. Methods: A pilot cohort of singleton pregnant women (N=101; age 25.9±4.1 years) was recruited from a tertiary, periurban hospital in Nepal. An adapted Nepali version of the PrimeScreen questionnaire, assessing weekly consumption frequency of 12 healthy and 9 unhealthy food groups, was administered twice and a month apart in both the 2nd and 3rd trimester. Up to four inconsecutive 24-hr dietary recalls (24-HDRs) were also completed each trimester and utilized as the reference method for validation. For each trimester, data from multiple 24-HDRs were averaged across days, and items were grouped to match the classification and the three weekly consumption categories (0-1, 2-3 or 4+ servings/week) of the 21 food groups represented on the PrimeScreen. Gwet’s agreement coefficients (AC1) were used to evaluate the reproducibility and validity of the adapted PrimeScreen against the 24-HDRs in both 2nd and 3rd trimester. Results: In the 2nd trimester, the adapted PrimeScreen demonstrated good to excellent reproducibility (AC1 > 0.6) for majority of the food groups; the reproducibility was moderate for eggs (AC1 = 0.4), and poor (AC1 < 0.4) for citrus fruits and leafy vegetables. In the 3rd trimester, AC1 for reproducibility of the PrimeScreen ranged from 0.4 (moderate agreement) to 1 (excellent agreement), with values ≥ 0.6 for 90% of the items indicating good to excellent reproducibility for the majority of the food groups. Compared to 24-HDRs, the adapted PrimeScreen showed moderate to excellent validity (AC1 ≥ 0.4) for all food groups except for eggs and leafy vegetables in both the 2nd and 3rd trimester, and additionally citrus fruits and cruciferous vegetables in the 2nd trimester alone. Classification into 3 consumption categories (0-1, 2-3 or 4+ servings/week) were consistent (percentage agreement >80%) between the PrimeScreen and 24-HDR for 80% of the food groups in both 2nd and 3rd trimester. Conclusion: The adapted PrimeScreen questionnaire appears to be a reliable and valid instrument for assessing the dietary intake of most food groups among pregnant women in Nepal. Funding Sources: NIH/FIC
    • Examining the Effects of Facebook’s Personalized Advertisements on Brand Love

      Tran, Trang; Blanchflower, Tiffany; Lin, Chien-Wei (Wilson) (2021)
      Personalized advertisements have been increasingly employed as a marketing strategy that enables a company to build strong relationship with customers. This research adopts the perceived personalization framework to show its consequential impacts on deep emotional constructs (i.e., brand attachment and brand love), especially on the Facebook ad platform. We model perceived personalization within a nomological framework that includes several well-established constructs (brand experience, brand self-expressiveness, brand attachment, and brand love) and establish causal relationships between the constructs. The current study sheds light into the psychological mechanism of personalization by underscoring the roles of perceived personalization and its positive impacts on consumer–brand relationships. Results from two studies show that perceived personalization of personalized advertisements is an essential factor of stronger brand love. Specifically, this research reveals that perceived personalized Facebook ads positively impact brand experience and brand self-expressiveness, which in turn enhances brand attachment and brand love. This paper contributes to branding literature by illustrating how advertisements strengthen consumer brand relationships and enable brand managers to make better informed decisions when crafting personalized advertisements.
    • The Importance of Spatial Skills for Workforce Relevant Geologic Interpretations

      Kreager, B. Zo (2021)
      Within academia and industry, spatial skills are essential for success as a student or expert in the geosciences. Little work has assessed the relationship between spatial skill and upper level undergraduate, graduate, or expert level geologic interpretations. This presentation will discuss results of a pre-post study that assess spatial skill and sequence stratigraphic interpretation. Additionally, the presentation will present how spatial skills may impact conceptual errors on interpretation tasks. This study had students complete a geologic task that contained a sequence stratigraphic diagram and a Wheeler diagram. The Sequence stratigraphic diagram is a depth vs. distance diagram of subsurface sediment. The Wheeler diagram and a spatiotemporal diagram representing time vs. distance and corresponds to the layers in the sequence stratigraphic diagram. The results show that mental folding and unfolding significantly predicted student interpretation scores for the complete task and each diagram. Item level analysis of students’ answers on the geologic task revealed a set of unique geologic conceptual errors, some of which are integral to students’ spatial understanding of the diagrams. One specific error will be featured in this presentation, students’ assumption that the lateral contact between rock units represents gaps in the rock record. This is a unique issue as this is geologically implausible, and that the representation of these contacts mimics introductory level representations of gaps in the rock record and students either are over-relying on the spatial skill of pattern matching or have major errors in their conceptual understanding. An essential aspect of this study is that it starts to explore student needs for interpreting spatiotemporal diagrams. Additionally, it is the first study within the geosciences to assess mental folding and unfolding, a skill used across geosciences and other STEM disciplines.
    • A New Automated Weather Station for SUNY Oneonta

      Karmosky, Christopher
      In August of 2021, a new weather station was installed on the roof of the Perna Science building at SUNY Oneonta. Daily weather records have been kept at SUNY Oneonta since the early 1980s including high and low temperature, precipitation, snowfall and snow depth. For much of this time we also have records for wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, humidity and solar radiation. The new weather station will help us continue this record well into the 2020s. These data have been used for a variety of student projects in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences as well as other departments across campus. Data are collected every five minutes and archived. At this time, data are updated to an internet dashboard every 10 minutes (hourly during the overnight period to save battery power) and anyone can examine data for the past month through the dashboard. Archived data can be obtained by submitting a request to Dr. Chris Karmosky at christopher.karmosky@oneonta.edu.
    • A Partnership in the Resurrection and Ascension of an Open Access Journal through SUNY Create

      Jensen, Jennifer; Fall, Leigh; Brunstad, Keith; Beck, Ed (2021)
      New partnerships and technologies are creating opportunities for faculty to develop and share open access journals and other digital scholarship at SUNY Oneonta. Our college is investing in open resources in multiple ways, including by opening a new faculty librarian position in 2020 to support and extend open access and scholarly communications services on campus. At the same time, the SUNY system has elevated SUNY Create from a campus-level project (born at SUNY Oneonta and three other comprehensive colleges) to a system-wide platform for faculty and students to build their own open-source, web-enabled teaching, learning, and research materials in a supported environment. Two faculty members from the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences department are unearthing the potential of SUNY Create by reviving Northeast Geoscience, a regional open access journal with a history on our campus. In partnership with Milne Library’s Scholarly Communications Librarian and an Instructional Designer from the Teaching, Learning, and Technology Center (TLTC), we are developing an open access journal site to host, manage, and display a newly accessible version of Northeast Geoscience journal.
    • Sounding Out Oneonta: Public Interest Programming on WONY 90.9 FM Student Radio

      Bottomley, Andrew (2021)
      WONY is the student-run college radio station at SUNY Oneonta. A noncommercial educational (NCE) radio station licensed by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC), it is licensed to the State University of New York (SUNY) and assigned the call sign “WONY” and the frequency 90.9 FM. Though operated as a student club through the Student Association (SA), WONY’s status as a federally regulated broadcaster serving the larger Oneonta region makes it a rather unique institution within the college. Among other requirements, WONY has a legal mandate to “transmit educational, cultural, and entertainment programs to the public.” In particular, the FCC requires each broadcast station to air a reasonable amount of programming responsive to significant community needs, issues, and problems as determined by the station. WONY must report compliance with this public interest mandate every quarter, and the successful delivery of these responsive programs is among the primary materials the FCC takes into consideration when the radio station’s broadcast license is renewed every eight years. Producing this type of community-oriented programming, though, requires a considerable commitment of time, energy, and ideas – resources that can be hard to come by when WONY is volunteer-run and student involvement is strictly extracurricular. This presentation investigates a few solutions that SUNY Oneonta faculty and students have devised to help WONY create issue-responsive programming that fulfills this public interest obligation while also making WONY an even more effective voice for the college. These include classroom-based projects such as the Oneonta Voices podcast, which students in Dr. Andrew Bottomley’s MCOM 340 Participatory Media class produced in 2018-19. Other students in the Media Studies program’s MCOM 253 Introduction to Audio Production have been making public service announcements (PSAs), which are short messages for nonprofit organizations and social causes that are aired on WONY every hour. Student club members have also created a series of person-on-the-street style interview segments called “WONY Asks,” where they choose a topic of concern to the campus community and then interview a cross-section of strangers in public spaces on campus to get their perspectives on the subject. Students have also been recording brief inspirational messages from faculty – advice on college, careers, and life – that are then interspersed into regular broadcasts. This presentation will offer brief audio examples of this creative programming that WONY is producing for the education and enjoyment of the SUNY Oneonta campus and surrounding communities.
    • SUNY Oneonta Textbook Survey: Undergraduate Students’ Preferences and Behaviors on the Use of Textbooks and Course Materials

      Beck, Ed; Jensen, Jennifer; Strauss, Jade; Cordice-Little, Britney (2021)
      Textbooks represent the fastest growing price tag for college students among many rising college expenses. In addition, the market for course materials has become more complicated with the rise of rentals, digital textbooks, online homework systems, and a diverse world of vendors from which to choose. This poster describes the results of a student-led survey about undergraduate students’ preferences and behaviors related to the attainment and use of textbooks and course materials. The survey asked how SUNY Oneonta students are experiencing the impact of rising textbook costs and increasingly complicated decisions. We explore how those results can inform our campus Open Educational Resources (OER) Initiative and other SUNY student success programs.
    • Evaluation of the Effects of Lake De-icers on Lake Heat Budget

      Yokota, Kiyoko; Stickney, Sierra; Lord, Paul H. (2021)
      Dock de-icers are devices that prevent ice formation around docks and shorelines of lakes via forced circulation or bubbling of water. While banned in some U.S. states, the use of such devices is not regulated in other states including New York State. Various concerns and conflicts related to dock de-icers have been voiced in New York State, including installation of oversized systems, sediment re-suspension, alteration of the lake heat budget, biogeochemistry, food web, and access and safety for recreational activities on frozen lakes. While hydrological models can simulate the effect of lake-wide ice and snow cover loss on lake water temperature under hypothetical scenarios, observed data on how dock de-icers locally affect water column temperature are scarce. We collected pilot data around a forced-circulation de-icer on Otsego Lake, New York, which provided evidence that proximity to the device exacerbated the cooling effects of cold snaps during winter as well as warming in the spring. In conjunction with the more extreme weather patterns anticipated in the future, more detailed study of the ecological effect of lake de-icers is warranted.
    • Pursuing Literacy Research in Precarious Times

      Abas, Suriati (2021)
      In times of crisis, literacy plays an important role in providing regular updates, alleviating problems and mitigating chaotic situations. Generally understood as an unanticipated negative event or series of events, a crisis may occur at the personal and/or global scale. Regardless of the scale, multiple works of literacy in the form of signs, banners, posters and/or social media posts are inherently visible within a planned or unplanned event. Covid-19 additionally leaves some of the most vulnerable communities with crisis within a crisis. The death of George Floyd in the custody of Minneapolis police, for instance, not only yielded a large turnout of protesters who used literacy artefacts as tools for demanding justice and changes in law enforcement practices, but also motivated city officials to take actions. Supporting weeks of anti-racism protests, a new street sign – ‘Black Lives Matter Plaza’ – was christened. A massive ‘Black Lives Matter’ mural was unveiled on the 16th street of Washington, DC, predating replicas in major cities across the U.S. (Asmelash, 2020). Each of these actions was instantaneously reproduced and circulated across multiple social media platforms through either user-generated or re-sharing of videos, photographs and texts that amplify police brutality. The overwhelming responses, rooted in the historical trajectory of Black protest literacies in America, comprise ‘visual and musical aesthetics and conversations with other people of color; reading and writing outside of class based on racial, class inflected politics not offered in classrooms’ (Kynard, 2013, p. 66). Literacy, at this particular moment, is viewed as a social practice or something people do to bring justice to the forefront. Taking a similar perspective to literacy, this presentation proposes a methodology for pursuing research in open public spaces based on a study conducted in Buenos Aires, Argentina from 2016 to 2019. Argentina is a compelling case not only for how the continuously changing socio-political climate influences literacy within schools and in out-of-school settings, but also for engaging in methodological innovations during times of precarity. While there is no one fix method, this study illustrates how works of literacy in open public spaces can be systematically documented using photographic data.
    • Casting the Bucket and the Ballot: African American Voters in the Booker T. Washington Era 1890-1910

      Ashford, Evan Howard; Bonilla, Maria Solis (2021)
      Although the suppression and disenfranchisement narrative has been well documented, one aspect of the story remains untold, the enfranchised minority. African Americans were not immediately eliminated from the voting booth and remained a presence in Southern politics. Voter suppression and disenfranchisement plagued African American voting during the 19th century’s last decade and the 20th century’s first decade. Mississippi’s 1890 constitutional convention specifically targeted the state’s African American voters instituting new voter registration and voting requirements that included a literacy test, understanding clause, and poll tax. Mississippi revolutionized Southern politics as several Southern states followed Mississippi’s model and drafted new state constitutions or amended existing constitutions to severely impair or remove African Americans from the voting arena. The question that historians have not explored is, how did the African American voting class survive the first voter suppression/disenfranchisement wave and how did Southern whites respond? African American gains in education and landownership positioned them to thwart voting hurdles that Southern legislatures designed based on assumptions pertaining to deficiencies in African American literacy, stability, and wealth accumulation. The continued African American presence in the political arena forced Southern whites to create new ways to maintain and cement their racial supremacy. Literacy test and poll taxes underestimated the African American education and land movements existing within the African American community during slavery and following emancipation. The rise of the rural working and middle class created an independent black proletariat capable of controlling their own financial destinies. Despite state constitutions reflecting anti-fourteenth and fifteenth amendment sentiments, there remained an African American voting class which Southern whites had to contend. Casting the Bucket and the Ballot: African American Voters in the Booker T. Washington Era 1890-1910 presents the African Americans who played a role in dictating late 19th century and early 20th century suffrage politics despite being in non-elected positions through biography and photography. Their continued voting presence exploited the weaknesses in the literacy test, poll tax, understanding clause, and residency requirements which Southern legislatures expended significant political capital justifying and implementing. Rather than providing a historical assessment, this work provides an encyclopedia of African American registered and actual voters during the disenfranchisement era. By demonstrating the quantity of voters, one is able to see the failed efforts of new Southern constitutions to effectively eliminate African American voters and the rebirth of African Americans in local, state, and national politics led to the creation of the white primary as the ultimate disenfranchising measure. Privatizing primary elections which dictated the terms of who could vote was the last, desperate, yet most effective, effort to achieve a white-dominated political system. The white primary represented the “second wave” of voter suppression and disenfranchisement that shaped 20th century suffrage politics culminating with the 1965 Voting Rights Act. To understanding this second wave, history must first address who were the African Americans that survived the first wave and how (in some instances) they defeated Southern racists attempts to strip African Americans of their political agency and citizenship.
    • A wormy world: Summer research in fish parasitology at SUNY Oneonta

      Reyda, Florian; Mendez, Gustavo; Curtin, Claire; Whitcomb, Hannah; Fleming, Morgan; Bulmer, Emily; Nielsen, Emma; Reyda, Florian (2021)
      During the summer of 2021 four students – Gustavo Mendez, Hannah Whitcomb, Morgan Fleming and Emily Bulmer – assisted Florian Reyda with a variety of endeavors as part of the fish parasitology research program. Students were involved in both field work and laboratory work. A major focus was a study of the parasites of Oneida Lake fishes here in New York. Oneida Lake was the focus of a set of classic parasitological studies (Van Cleave & Mueller, 1932) that took place nearly 100 years ago. These studies are widely known within the field of fish parasitology (see Scholz & Choudhury, 2014) because they included descriptions of 33 new species of parasitic worms, from a diversity of fish species. Thus, Oneida Lake is the type locality (i.e., original place of discovery) for 33 species of parasitic worms—a truly remarkable number! Reyda and students conducted fish parasite survey of Oneida Lake fishes during the first half of the summer. The overall objective of that survey is to identify how many of the previously discovered 33 species of parasitic worms are still present today. They collected a diversity of fish from one particular stream, Chittenango Creek, but also examined a diversity of fish that were provided by colleagues at the Cornell Biological Field Station. Reyda and students also examined fish samples from Otsego Lake and Moe Pond—two water bodies that are accessible via the SUNY Oneonta Biological Field Station. In August, Reyda and three students traveled to Douglas Lake Michigan in order to sample fish parasites there. The specific objective was to collect two species of thorny-headed worms (acanthocephalans), from their type locality. One of those species, Octospinifer macilentus was the specific focus of one of the students in the lab, Claire Curtin. The survey work was an extra challenge because the main fish of interest, white sucker, were few and far between in the streams, and it took miles of stream walking with a backpack shocker in order to encounter enough white sucker to constitute a decent sample size. We obtained one of the two target species, but unfortunately not the one Claire needed for her project. In addition to field work, during summer students performed fish dissections in the lab and isolated parasites that they then prepared as permanent microscope slides. This aspect of the summer work is very important because it results in a set of study specimens that students can use for independent study projects during the upcoming academic year.