• SUNY Oneonta Textbook Survey: Undergraduate Students’ Preferences and Behaviors on the Use of Textbooks and Course Materials

      Beck, Ed; Jensen, Jennifer; Strauss, Jade; Cordice-Little, Britney (2021)
      Textbooks represent the fastest growing price tag for college students among many rising college expenses. In addition, the market for course materials has become more complicated with the rise of rentals, digital textbooks, online homework systems, and a diverse world of vendors from which to choose. This poster describes the results of a student-led survey about undergraduate students’ preferences and behaviors related to the attainment and use of textbooks and course materials. The survey asked how SUNY Oneonta students are experiencing the impact of rising textbook costs and increasingly complicated decisions. We explore how those results can inform our campus Open Educational Resources (OER) Initiative and other SUNY student success programs.
    • Relative Validity and Reproducibility of a Dietary Screener Adapted for use among Pregnant Women in Dhulikhel, Nepal

      Martin, Kelly; Shah, Krupali; Shrestha, Abha; Barrett, Emily; Shrestha, Archana; Rawal, Shristi (2021)
      Objective: Culturally appropriate dietary assessments are lacking in many low-income countries including Nepal. Here we examined the reproducibility and validity of a dietary screener which was translated and adapted to assess diet quality among pregnant Nepalese women. Methods: A pilot cohort of singleton pregnant women (N=101; age 25.9±4.1 years) was recruited from a tertiary, periurban hospital in Nepal. An adapted Nepali version of the PrimeScreen questionnaire, assessing weekly consumption frequency of 12 healthy and 9 unhealthy food groups, was administered twice and a month apart in both the 2nd and 3rd trimester. Up to four inconsecutive 24-hr dietary recalls (24-HDRs) were also completed each trimester and utilized as the reference method for validation. For each trimester, data from multiple 24-HDRs were averaged across days, and items were grouped to match the classification and the three weekly consumption categories (0-1, 2-3 or 4+ servings/week) of the 21 food groups represented on the PrimeScreen. Gwet’s agreement coefficients (AC1) were used to evaluate the reproducibility and validity of the adapted PrimeScreen against the 24-HDRs in both 2nd and 3rd trimester. Results: In the 2nd trimester, the adapted PrimeScreen demonstrated good to excellent reproducibility (AC1 > 0.6) for majority of the food groups; the reproducibility was moderate for eggs (AC1 = 0.4), and poor (AC1 < 0.4) for citrus fruits and leafy vegetables. In the 3rd trimester, AC1 for reproducibility of the PrimeScreen ranged from 0.4 (moderate agreement) to 1 (excellent agreement), with values ≥ 0.6 for 90% of the items indicating good to excellent reproducibility for the majority of the food groups. Compared to 24-HDRs, the adapted PrimeScreen showed moderate to excellent validity (AC1 ≥ 0.4) for all food groups except for eggs and leafy vegetables in both the 2nd and 3rd trimester, and additionally citrus fruits and cruciferous vegetables in the 2nd trimester alone. Classification into 3 consumption categories (0-1, 2-3 or 4+ servings/week) were consistent (percentage agreement >80%) between the PrimeScreen and 24-HDR for 80% of the food groups in both 2nd and 3rd trimester. Conclusion: The adapted PrimeScreen questionnaire appears to be a reliable and valid instrument for assessing the dietary intake of most food groups among pregnant women in Nepal. Funding Sources: NIH/FIC
    • Against all Odds: Experiential, Collaborative and Service Teaching during the Strange Days of Remote Instruction

      Stengler, A. Erik; Johnson, Mary (2021)
      The academic year 2020/21 presented serious challenges for teaching and learning. One of the major difficulties was to maintain the standards of experiential learning despite the switch to online/dual instruction modalities and the sudden withdrawal of funds that were already allocated, precisely when there was more need of them than ever in order to create alternative experiential learning opportunities. Despite these obstacles the Science Track courses of the Cooperstown Graduate Program managed to continue to provide the experiential learning projects that are part and parcel of their curriculum, with the added value of also maintaining and cultivating the collaborations with external institutions from our surrounding communities for whom these projects are an essential service, at a time when they most needed the support that CGP is well known to provide through service teaching. The projects include the design of activities for the Wings of Eagles Discovery Center in Horseheads, NY; research on public gardens on Otsego county for the Cornell Cooperative Extension in Cooperstown, NY; the creation of an audio guide to historic buildings and sites in Little Falls, NY for the Little Falls Historical Society; and the participation in an international educational collaboration to reproduce the measurement of the circumference of the Earth by the Greek polymath Erathostenes in the 3rd century BC. All these activities could be performed in compliance with all restrictions and limitations that were in effect at any given time; most of them were carried out outdoors. We present a brief summary of these projects and a status report of our plans to make the outputs of Science Track projects like these publicly available through a dedicated public online repository.
    • Dextral and Extensional Faults in the Iron Mountains, Southwest Virginia; Strain Variation in an Over-thickened Salient Wedge During Late Stage Alleghanian Collision

      Scharman, Mitchell (2021)
      Along strike strain variation related to the Alleghanian Orogeny are observed in the Iron Mountains, southwest Virginia, located in the transition between the Virginia salient and Tennessee recess. A regional scale dextral transpression fault—the E-W striking Byllesby-Falls fault system (BFFS)—is present across the Iron Mountains. Tectonic convergence direction during the later stages of the Alleghanian orogeny transitioned from an initial NW-directed transport phase to a WNW-directed transport phase (e.g. Wise, 2004). This change in tectonic transport direction introduced a lateral kinematic component into the structural corner of the orogen and was accommodated by formation of the BFFS during the later Alleghanian stage. Additionally, there are 2 populations of mesoscale normal faults observed in Iron Mountains: 1) faults orthogonal to BFFS with purely normal slip motion, and 2) faults parallel to the BFFS with either oblique normal slip or alternating between normal and dextral slip motion. The first normal slip fault population is appropriately oriented to accommodate tangential extension along the BFFS during oblique convergence in the structural corner. The second normal fault population may have formed to accommodate extension in response to an over-steepening orogenic wedge as it exceeded critical taper angle. However, this normal fault population also accommodated dextral motion within the salient wedge. These fault populations in the Iron Mountains indicate that extension and dextral transpression motion were simultaneously active components and record three-dimensional structural processes in the salient wedge during the last stage of Alleghanian collision.
    • Surviving Through Your SCARs: Humanistic Strategies for a World Gone Wild

      Green, Michael (2021)
      The aim of this work is to answer two questions: According to the humanities, what kind of world do we inhabit, and what strategies can the humanities provide for surviving and thriving in this world? We inhabit a world of volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity, which in our current situation manifests itself in international instability due to the decline of Western empires, social instability due to racial conflicts, financial instability due to an unstable currency, and economic instability due to the transition into the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Such volatility creates emotional scars, and the humanistic strategies for managing these scars are Self-Reliance, Creative Problem Solving, Adaptability, and Resilience (SCARs).
    • What Is the SUNY Oneonta Faculty Fellows Program?

      Aucoin, Brendan; Bishop, Jacqueline S. (Bruscella); Fall, Leigh; Montoya, Maria (2021)
      The Faculty Fellows (previously called Administrative Fellows) Program is a pilot program in Academic Affairs that addresses faculty leadership, institutional needs, and collaboration. It provides professional development opportunities for those who are considering administrative roles, by developing focused projects. The projects are addressing SUNY Oneonta’s mission critical goals in experiential learning, student engagement and retention, and inclusivity/diversity. The faculty fellows are an interdisciplinary team that strengthen the roles and offices of the academic deans and library director by integrating the academic schools/units. The 2021-2022 cohort includes Brendan Aucoin (Milne Library), Jacqueline (Bruscella) Bishop (Communication and Media), Leigh M. Fall (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences), and Maria Cristina Montoya (Foreign Languages and Literatures). Brendan is working on a series of projects related to highlighting SUNY Oneonta research and scholarship in the Milne Library. Among these are the development of the Library Special Researcher program for students and creating more opportunities to showcase faculty scholarship in the library. Jackie is working on a series of interrelated initiatives centered on experiential learning. Through cross-campus collaborations. Jackie's project seeks to a) increase access to on-campus and local internship opportunities, b) improve student, faculty, and site-supervisor understanding and use of Handshake, and c) strengthen career readiness programming for students, particularly those studying in the liberal arts. Leigh is working on two projects for the School of Sciences. One project is researching mechanisms of how interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary courses and research happens within the school, highlighting potential barriers and opportunities. The other project is researching past and current STEM experiential learning opportunities to help faculty provide productive experiences for students. MC is working on three projects: first the internationalization of the School of EHESS, including a focus on Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) as a platform; second, developing the curricula and partnerships for the Bilingual Education graduate program; third, diverse faculty retention.
    • Non-Cognitive Skills in US and Kenyan Mathematics Curriculum

      Kamina, Penina (2021)
      Is mathematics taught in one country different from another one? How do concepts such as division, multiplication or facts like pi or mathematical conventions such PEMDAS/BODMAS compare from one country to another? True that mathematical content is the same regardless of the global location. The context and method used to present the concepts may vary from one place to another but the idea and notion stays the same. Aside from content, there are other learning found in mathematics classrooms that are not cognitive-oriented but very crucial and fundamental in preparing students to thrive as citizens of their nation and beyond. This presentation highlights the non-cognitive skill sets or soft skills, found in the US and in Kenyan math curricula—talk describes the attributes of the soft skills found in both countries as well as compares and contrasts these curricula. Presently, Kenya is on its fifth year of implementing competency-based curriculum where one of its main foci is on building capacity in communication and collaboration, self-efficacy, critical thinking and problem solving, creativity and imagination, citizenship, digital literacy, and learning to learn. The discussion explores how these seven non-content based core competencies look like in mathematics classrooms plus their implications in education. On the other hand, currently several US States have adapted the Common Core mathematics, which has two types of standards; that is, the mathematical content standards and standards for mathematical practice (SMP). The SMP are soft skills and core practices that Pre-K up to grade 12 students must be well versed in by the time they move to tertiary education. There are eight SMPs, which the presentation will focus on. The SMPs include: make sense of problems and persevere in solving them; reason abstractly and quantitatively; construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others; model with mathematics; use appropriate tools strategically; attend to precision; look for and make use of structure and look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. The presentation shades light on these important soft skills, by making them more explicit. Note that the non-cognitive skillsets embedded in math classrooms carries more significant weight of learning; way much more than mere memorizing of procedural routine of finding an answer to a math problem. For instance, the aftermath of solving a math problem to its end to a solution set, is crucial since the ensuing attributes of endurance, determination and resiliency are examples of non-cognitive skill sets that will carry one outside the mathematics classroom, or in problem solving real life opportunities and challenges or in service to a country.
    • Bringing Social Studies alive for Elementary Education Majors

      Jakubowski, Casey (2021)
      NCSS, and other organizations concerned with civic education have announced, researched and reported that social studies is one of the least taught core four subjects in elementary school. As Elementary Education majors are weeded, screened, tested, and valued based upon literacy and numeracy skills, social studies is pushed by schools facing state accountability sanctions to the back of the priority list. Yet we have all gathered civics is crucial, and imperative in conjunction with the other four identified key social studies inquiry areas. The NCSS, and New York State have charged a new course, with the C3 (College, career and civics life) standards at the national level, and the new New York State Common Core Learning Standards aligned social studies frameworks, designed to refresh the New York State 2001 state learning standards frameworks. While the legislation, Commissioner’s regulations, and secondary testing elements of the Regents exams in Global History and Geography as well as the United States History and Geography exams weigh heavily on secondary teachers, elementary teachers found conflict with the demands of ELA and math, and limited time during the day. Further, Elementary Education majors, when surveyed, found social studies one of the least interesting subjects, and often were, in their own opinions, unprepared to teach classes after the General Education courses required for a bachelor's degree. This research is based on action research of my own instruction into the Inquiry Design Method (IDM), pioneered by the C3 teachers. Essentially, the practice asks teachers to engage their students in “big ideas” and “big questions” by deep diving into events and happenings which dramatically impact the narrative created for social studies. I take this a step further, and ask my students in methods classes to focus on the love of investigation. Over the course of the semester, we have examined how the social studies K-6 frameworks intersect with other disciplines, and their cross curricular integration and purpose. I describe this work in my now under contract work Engaging the Citizenry (Edumatch 2022). As a class we investigate centers, designed around the five senses. We examine how family histories are part of the “Grand narrative” of the past. We implemented a living history day comparing tools, cooking, and shelter of different time periods from the Paleolithic to the Civil War. As a class, we remember that subjects should not be isolated, and that the “core four” create the scaffold for every learning experience each student has. In this day and age of information overload, we stop, and we reflect on critical questions: Why do you think? What do you wonder? How can we investigate?
    • Is it Happening to You? Workplace Bullying, Mobbing, and other Forms of Workplace Psychological Abuse are More Prevalent than you Think!

      Stalter, Heather (2021)
      Self-censorship, mistrust, loss of morale, resentment, isolation, burnout, headaches, hair loss, sleep problems, eating disorders, stomach ulcers, coronary heart disease, chronic health conditions, panic attacks, anxiety, clinical depression, PDSD, suicidal ideation. These are not things one hopes for when earning a living; however, they can be just a few of the very real consequences of workplace psychological abuse. Despite the plethora of documented evidence of the long-lasting damage done to targets, witnesses, and organizations, workplace psychological abuse, in any of its manifestations, is prevalent and pervasive in many workplaces, including on college campuses. Since its launch on September 27, 2021, the library guide Resources on Bullying, Mobbing, and Other Forms of Workplace Psychological Violence has received 196 views, indicating that the topic is of considerable interest on this campus. The guide and my presentation are inspired by an extensive literature review, my own personal experiences with mobbing, a desire to help others, and a strong determination to encourage awareness in everyone.
    • Reproduction across the Four Fields of Anthropology

      Han, Sallie; Betsinger, Tracy K.; Rudzik, Alanna E. F. (2021)
      The Routledge Handbook of Anthropology and Reproduction is a comprehensive overview of the topics, approaches, and trajectories in the anthropological study of human reproduction. The book—which will be available in print and as an e-book in November 2021—brings together work from across the discipline of anthropology, with contributions by scholars in archaeological, biological, linguistic, and sociocultural anthropology. A significant theme of the Handbook, which is co-edited by Han and Dr. Cecília Tomori (Johns Hopkins University), is the need to engage in conversations across the subdisciplines of anthropology. Featured in the volume are chapters on the bioarchaeology of reproduction (Betsinger), the sociolinguistics of pregnancy (Han), and the culture and biology of human infant sleep (Rudzik).
    • A New Automated Weather Station for SUNY Oneonta

      Karmosky, Christopher
      In August of 2021, a new weather station was installed on the roof of the Perna Science building at SUNY Oneonta. Daily weather records have been kept at SUNY Oneonta since the early 1980s including high and low temperature, precipitation, snowfall and snow depth. For much of this time we also have records for wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, humidity and solar radiation. The new weather station will help us continue this record well into the 2020s. These data have been used for a variety of student projects in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences as well as other departments across campus. Data are collected every five minutes and archived. At this time, data are updated to an internet dashboard every 10 minutes (hourly during the overnight period to save battery power) and anyone can examine data for the past month through the dashboard. Archived data can be obtained by submitting a request to Dr. Chris Karmosky at christopher.karmosky@oneonta.edu.