• Faculty Publications in the Alden Room: The Alden Scholar Series

      Wienke, Lori; Stalter, Heather; Rhodes, Sarah; Hendley, Michelle; Dourlaris, Christie; Bensen, Mary Lynn (2021)
      One of the many treasures of the Alden Room in Milne Library is the Faculty Publications Collection. In this collection are books on various subjects written by faculty, professional staff, and administrative staff over the course of the College’s history since its foundation in 1889 as the Oneonta Normal School.
    • Immune-Mediated Repair and Regeneration of the Nervous System

      Duscher, Kristen; Chumpitazi, Christina; Watanabe, Junryo (2021)
      All animals have the ability to repair damaged or diseased tissues. The degree to which regeneration can occur can vary from some invertebrates and vertebrates regenerating entire limbs, to mammals which have a very restricted regenerative capacity. While damages to muscle, peripheral nerves, and, to a limited extent, liver initiates regenerative programs to restore function, the central nervous system (CNS) healing is largely incomplete. Rapid and efficient clearance of cellular debris is necessary for tissue regeneration to occur. Myelin debris can be found in the white matter tracts years after an injury to the CNS in both humans and primates. Myelin is a membrane outgrowth of glial cells that ensheath axons purpose of which is to allow fast saltatory conduction of action potential along the axon. Myelin sheath also has within it many proteins that are inhibitory for axon growth, presumably to prevent errant axon sprouting. The prolonged presence of myelin-associated inhibitors of axon regeneration is thought to be a major contributor to the failure of recovery after injury to the CNS. Myelin in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) also contains inhibitors of axon regeneration. In stark contrast to the CNS, injury to the PNS results in rapid clearance of myelin thereby making the environment permissive for axon regeneration. It has been demonstrated that endogenous antibodies are required for rapid and robust clearance of myelin debris after injury to the PNS. Endogenous antibodies enter the site of injury and bind myelin debris which recruits macrophages to rapidly phagocytose the debris. It was hypothesized that Th2 activated (alternatively activated) macrophages (or M2 macrophages) are playing a critical role in the clearance of myelin and other apoptotic debris in PNS injury. Perhaps, then, this might be another explanation why the PNS recovers and the CNS fails to recover after injury. This would have significant implications for people who suffer from spinal cord injuries.
    • The Importance of Spatial Skills for Workforce Relevant Geologic Interpretations

      Kreager, B. Zo (2021)
      Within academia and industry, spatial skills are essential for success as a student or expert in the geosciences. Little work has assessed the relationship between spatial skill and upper level undergraduate, graduate, or expert level geologic interpretations. This presentation will discuss results of a pre-post study that assess spatial skill and sequence stratigraphic interpretation. Additionally, the presentation will present how spatial skills may impact conceptual errors on interpretation tasks. This study had students complete a geologic task that contained a sequence stratigraphic diagram and a Wheeler diagram. The Sequence stratigraphic diagram is a depth vs. distance diagram of subsurface sediment. The Wheeler diagram and a spatiotemporal diagram representing time vs. distance and corresponds to the layers in the sequence stratigraphic diagram. The results show that mental folding and unfolding significantly predicted student interpretation scores for the complete task and each diagram. Item level analysis of students’ answers on the geologic task revealed a set of unique geologic conceptual errors, some of which are integral to students’ spatial understanding of the diagrams. One specific error will be featured in this presentation, students’ assumption that the lateral contact between rock units represents gaps in the rock record. This is a unique issue as this is geologically implausible, and that the representation of these contacts mimics introductory level representations of gaps in the rock record and students either are over-relying on the spatial skill of pattern matching or have major errors in their conceptual understanding. An essential aspect of this study is that it starts to explore student needs for interpreting spatiotemporal diagrams. Additionally, it is the first study within the geosciences to assess mental folding and unfolding, a skill used across geosciences and other STEM disciplines.
    • Integrating Service-Learning is Easier than You Think!

      Solano, Gina L. (2021)
      Are you interested in increasing student engagement as well as promoting social justice in your courses? If you have considered incorporating service-learning into one or more of your classes, but haven’t been sure about how to get started, join this session for inspiration and ideas about how to begin designing service-learning projects. Strategies will be shared about how to design projects that encourage students to become actively involved in the local community as well as how to create your own network of community partners. No matter what your content area is, there is always a way to have your students provide service, which not only reinforces the content and your course’s learning objectives but also benefits students by teaching them empathy, understanding, how to reduce bias, and provides them with an awareness of community issues. Academically, students benefit from service-learning through real-world application of the concepts and skills they are learning in their courses. Their experiences in the community build their resume as well as provide them with opportunities to network and open new doors of possibility. Come learn how to make a local, national, and even an international impact through incorporating service-learning into your pedagogy.
    • Is it Happening to You? Workplace Bullying, Mobbing, and other Forms of Workplace Psychological Abuse are More Prevalent than you Think!

      Stalter, Heather (2021)
      Self-censorship, mistrust, loss of morale, resentment, isolation, burnout, headaches, hair loss, sleep problems, eating disorders, stomach ulcers, coronary heart disease, chronic health conditions, panic attacks, anxiety, clinical depression, PDSD, suicidal ideation. These are not things one hopes for when earning a living; however, they can be just a few of the very real consequences of workplace psychological abuse. Despite the plethora of documented evidence of the long-lasting damage done to targets, witnesses, and organizations, workplace psychological abuse, in any of its manifestations, is prevalent and pervasive in many workplaces, including on college campuses. Since its launch on September 27, 2021, the library guide Resources on Bullying, Mobbing, and Other Forms of Workplace Psychological Violence has received 196 views, indicating that the topic is of considerable interest on this campus. The guide and my presentation are inspired by an extensive literature review, my own personal experiences with mobbing, a desire to help others, and a strong determination to encourage awareness in everyone.
    • Midnight Bouquet

      Aultman, Jody (2021)
      Gold work is embroidery using metal threads and bullions. It is thought to have been created in Asia nearly 2000 years ago. In the Middle Ages England developed a style called Opus Anglicanum, which means “English work.” It refers to embroideries in ecclesiastical hangings. (Pile, 2018) Many were worked on linen showing religious themes. (Bumpkin, 2015) The 12th century saw a decline in goldwork embroidery due to the plague killing half of the population. The 16th century saw a revival of the technique of heavily embroidered garments which were used as attire for the rich, creating a status symbol for the wealthy. (Pile, 2018) Early 19th century disappeared from fashion with a limited use in haute couture. Today goldwork embroidery is used for military pieces, religious and ceremonial purposes. (Bumpkin, 2015) Today goldwork is no longer privileged to the church and the wealthy, although it is very time consuming with stunning looks. The goldwork attracts attention from embroiderers going in new directions with the art. The larger meaning of this project is to create a garment using goldwork embroidery. I have used many embroidery techniques throughout my life and have had many students approach me wanting to learn. Since we do not have anything like this in our curriculum, I do independent studies with the students. While I was searching for different embroidery supplies and to see what was new or different, I came across the goldwork embroidery. I would like to create a garment using goldwork embroidery on black silk charmeuse evening dress. My plan is to make an evening gown out of black silk charmeuse, with a full skirt and tulle to help hold the shape. On the bodice of the dress, I plan to use different gold threads, Flatworm, Gimp Cords, Grecian Twist, Purl Threads, etc. to design a pattern. I will also use some gold on the skirt in various places, but not too much as the gold is heavy and can weigh the flow of the skirt down. I think this project will help my personal skills grow in that I can experiment with the goldwork and see what kinds of designs I can create. Once I become more familiar with the gold work embroidery, I will be better equipped to assist students in learning this advanced skill.
    • Milne Library as Scholarly Partner

      Aucoin, Brendan; Stewart, Karen (2021)
      During fall semester 2021, Brendan Aucoin (Milne Library) and Karen Stewart (Communication and Media) collaborated to present Leap of Faith, an applied-learning video game project, to the campus community. The game's opening reception and month-long installation at Milne Library served as a means for displaying creative faculty scholarship publicly, and as an opportunity for the library to partner with faculty scholars in new and exciting ways. In this presentation, Brendan and Karen discuss the ways the library acted as a scholarly collaborator, including the repurposing of a storage room as a display space for scholarship, library support in furthering the development of the game, and library resources curated to support game studies at SUNY Oneonta.
    • Music in a Sacred Space Presents Pianist Adam Kent in a Virtual Recital

      Kent, Adam (2021)
      The Pandemic may have imposed a temporary halt on live performances, but musicians and concert presenters continued to find innovative ways of bringing live music to audiences hungry for solace and beauty. “Music in a Sacred Space” at The Church on the Hill in Flushing, New York sponsored a virtual piano recital I was pleased to offer there last January. The program included works by Mozart, Chopin, Gershwin and Turina, and remains accessible on YouTube.
    • A New Automated Weather Station for SUNY Oneonta

      Karmosky, Christopher
      In August of 2021, a new weather station was installed on the roof of the Perna Science building at SUNY Oneonta. Daily weather records have been kept at SUNY Oneonta since the early 1980s including high and low temperature, precipitation, snowfall and snow depth. For much of this time we also have records for wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, humidity and solar radiation. The new weather station will help us continue this record well into the 2020s. These data have been used for a variety of student projects in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences as well as other departments across campus. Data are collected every five minutes and archived. At this time, data are updated to an internet dashboard every 10 minutes (hourly during the overnight period to save battery power) and anyone can examine data for the past month through the dashboard. Archived data can be obtained by submitting a request to Dr. Chris Karmosky at christopher.karmosky@oneonta.edu.
    • Non-Cognitive Skills in US and Kenyan Mathematics Curriculum

      Kamina, Penina (2021)
      Is mathematics taught in one country different from another one? How do concepts such as division, multiplication or facts like pi or mathematical conventions such PEMDAS/BODMAS compare from one country to another? True that mathematical content is the same regardless of the global location. The context and method used to present the concepts may vary from one place to another but the idea and notion stays the same. Aside from content, there are other learning found in mathematics classrooms that are not cognitive-oriented but very crucial and fundamental in preparing students to thrive as citizens of their nation and beyond. This presentation highlights the non-cognitive skill sets or soft skills, found in the US and in Kenyan math curricula—talk describes the attributes of the soft skills found in both countries as well as compares and contrasts these curricula. Presently, Kenya is on its fifth year of implementing competency-based curriculum where one of its main foci is on building capacity in communication and collaboration, self-efficacy, critical thinking and problem solving, creativity and imagination, citizenship, digital literacy, and learning to learn. The discussion explores how these seven non-content based core competencies look like in mathematics classrooms plus their implications in education. On the other hand, currently several US States have adapted the Common Core mathematics, which has two types of standards; that is, the mathematical content standards and standards for mathematical practice (SMP). The SMP are soft skills and core practices that Pre-K up to grade 12 students must be well versed in by the time they move to tertiary education. There are eight SMPs, which the presentation will focus on. The SMPs include: make sense of problems and persevere in solving them; reason abstractly and quantitatively; construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others; model with mathematics; use appropriate tools strategically; attend to precision; look for and make use of structure and look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. The presentation shades light on these important soft skills, by making them more explicit. Note that the non-cognitive skillsets embedded in math classrooms carries more significant weight of learning; way much more than mere memorizing of procedural routine of finding an answer to a math problem. For instance, the aftermath of solving a math problem to its end to a solution set, is crucial since the ensuing attributes of endurance, determination and resiliency are examples of non-cognitive skill sets that will carry one outside the mathematics classroom, or in problem solving real life opportunities and challenges or in service to a country.
    • A Partnership in the Resurrection and Ascension of an Open Access Journal through SUNY Create

      Jensen, Jennifer; Fall, Leigh; Brunstad, Keith; Beck, Ed (2021)
      New partnerships and technologies are creating opportunities for faculty to develop and share open access journals and other digital scholarship at SUNY Oneonta. Our college is investing in open resources in multiple ways, including by opening a new faculty librarian position in 2020 to support and extend open access and scholarly communications services on campus. At the same time, the SUNY system has elevated SUNY Create from a campus-level project (born at SUNY Oneonta and three other comprehensive colleges) to a system-wide platform for faculty and students to build their own open-source, web-enabled teaching, learning, and research materials in a supported environment. Two faculty members from the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences department are unearthing the potential of SUNY Create by reviving Northeast Geoscience, a regional open access journal with a history on our campus. In partnership with Milne Library’s Scholarly Communications Librarian and an Instructional Designer from the Teaching, Learning, and Technology Center (TLTC), we are developing an open access journal site to host, manage, and display a newly accessible version of Northeast Geoscience journal.
    • Promoting Recruitment, Opportunity, Diversity, Inclusion and Growth (PRODiG) at SUNY Oneonta

      Allen, Tracy; Tiapo, Bernadette (2021)
      This presentation will describe SUNY Oneonta’s PRODiG program, demonstrate program success, and spotlight PRODiG faculty. The purpose of PRODiG is to increase the representation of historically underrepresented faculty at SUNY, including underrepresented minority (URM) faculty and women faculty of all races in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields (WSTEM). PRODiG is envisioned as part of our broader campus diversity and inclusion initiatives. In our second year of participation, SUNY Oneonta formalized a strong working committee, the PRODiG Steering Committee, with the charge to move forward action items toward our goals to: increase representation of URM/WSTEM faculty through hiring and retention; enhance the pipeline of URM/WSTEM students pursuing and entering graduate school and URM/WSTEM graduates to academic careers; and improve the campus climate for diversity, equity, and inclusion. To date, SUNY has approved four PRODIG Faculty at SUNY Oneonta: Cohort I (2019-2020) - Dr. Angela Migues, Chemistry & Biochemistry, and Dr. Elio Santos, Psychology; Cohort II (2020-2021) - Dr. Kimberly Cossey, Chemistry & Biochemistry, and Dr. Valerie Rapson, Physics & Astronomy; and one PRODiG Pre/Post-Doctoral Fellow - Dr. Casey Coomes, Biology. In addition to Co-Chairs Tracy Allen and Bernadette Tiapo, members of the PRODiG Steering Committee include Kelly Gallagher (Chemistry & Biochemistry), Tracy Hartwell (Human Resources), Shahin Kachwala (Women’s & Gender Studies), Kathy Meeker (Grants Development Office), Diana Moller (College Assistance Migrant Program), Joshua Nelson (Institutional Assessment), Rhea Nowak (Faculty Center), Andrew Stammel (Student Development), and Napoleon Tipao (Academic Affairs).
    • Pursuing Literacy Research in Precarious Times

      Abas, Suriati (2021)
      In times of crisis, literacy plays an important role in providing regular updates, alleviating problems and mitigating chaotic situations. Generally understood as an unanticipated negative event or series of events, a crisis may occur at the personal and/or global scale. Regardless of the scale, multiple works of literacy in the form of signs, banners, posters and/or social media posts are inherently visible within a planned or unplanned event. Covid-19 additionally leaves some of the most vulnerable communities with crisis within a crisis. The death of George Floyd in the custody of Minneapolis police, for instance, not only yielded a large turnout of protesters who used literacy artefacts as tools for demanding justice and changes in law enforcement practices, but also motivated city officials to take actions. Supporting weeks of anti-racism protests, a new street sign – ‘Black Lives Matter Plaza’ – was christened. A massive ‘Black Lives Matter’ mural was unveiled on the 16th street of Washington, DC, predating replicas in major cities across the U.S. (Asmelash, 2020). Each of these actions was instantaneously reproduced and circulated across multiple social media platforms through either user-generated or re-sharing of videos, photographs and texts that amplify police brutality. The overwhelming responses, rooted in the historical trajectory of Black protest literacies in America, comprise ‘visual and musical aesthetics and conversations with other people of color; reading and writing outside of class based on racial, class inflected politics not offered in classrooms’ (Kynard, 2013, p. 66). Literacy, at this particular moment, is viewed as a social practice or something people do to bring justice to the forefront. Taking a similar perspective to literacy, this presentation proposes a methodology for pursuing research in open public spaces based on a study conducted in Buenos Aires, Argentina from 2016 to 2019. Argentina is a compelling case not only for how the continuously changing socio-political climate influences literacy within schools and in out-of-school settings, but also for engaging in methodological innovations during times of precarity. While there is no one fix method, this study illustrates how works of literacy in open public spaces can be systematically documented using photographic data.
    • Relative Validity and Reproducibility of a Dietary Screener Adapted for use among Pregnant Women in Dhulikhel, Nepal

      Martin, Kelly; Shah, Krupali; Shrestha, Abha; Barrett, Emily; Shrestha, Archana; Rawal, Shristi (2021)
      Objective: Culturally appropriate dietary assessments are lacking in many low-income countries including Nepal. Here we examined the reproducibility and validity of a dietary screener which was translated and adapted to assess diet quality among pregnant Nepalese women. Methods: A pilot cohort of singleton pregnant women (N=101; age 25.9±4.1 years) was recruited from a tertiary, periurban hospital in Nepal. An adapted Nepali version of the PrimeScreen questionnaire, assessing weekly consumption frequency of 12 healthy and 9 unhealthy food groups, was administered twice and a month apart in both the 2nd and 3rd trimester. Up to four inconsecutive 24-hr dietary recalls (24-HDRs) were also completed each trimester and utilized as the reference method for validation. For each trimester, data from multiple 24-HDRs were averaged across days, and items were grouped to match the classification and the three weekly consumption categories (0-1, 2-3 or 4+ servings/week) of the 21 food groups represented on the PrimeScreen. Gwet’s agreement coefficients (AC1) were used to evaluate the reproducibility and validity of the adapted PrimeScreen against the 24-HDRs in both 2nd and 3rd trimester. Results: In the 2nd trimester, the adapted PrimeScreen demonstrated good to excellent reproducibility (AC1 > 0.6) for majority of the food groups; the reproducibility was moderate for eggs (AC1 = 0.4), and poor (AC1 < 0.4) for citrus fruits and leafy vegetables. In the 3rd trimester, AC1 for reproducibility of the PrimeScreen ranged from 0.4 (moderate agreement) to 1 (excellent agreement), with values ≥ 0.6 for 90% of the items indicating good to excellent reproducibility for the majority of the food groups. Compared to 24-HDRs, the adapted PrimeScreen showed moderate to excellent validity (AC1 ≥ 0.4) for all food groups except for eggs and leafy vegetables in both the 2nd and 3rd trimester, and additionally citrus fruits and cruciferous vegetables in the 2nd trimester alone. Classification into 3 consumption categories (0-1, 2-3 or 4+ servings/week) were consistent (percentage agreement >80%) between the PrimeScreen and 24-HDR for 80% of the food groups in both 2nd and 3rd trimester. Conclusion: The adapted PrimeScreen questionnaire appears to be a reliable and valid instrument for assessing the dietary intake of most food groups among pregnant women in Nepal. Funding Sources: NIH/FIC
    • Reproduction across the Four Fields of Anthropology

      Han, Sallie; Betsinger, Tracy K.; Rudzik, Alanna E. F. (2021)
      The Routledge Handbook of Anthropology and Reproduction is a comprehensive overview of the topics, approaches, and trajectories in the anthropological study of human reproduction. The book—which will be available in print and as an e-book in November 2021—brings together work from across the discipline of anthropology, with contributions by scholars in archaeological, biological, linguistic, and sociocultural anthropology. A significant theme of the Handbook, which is co-edited by Han and Dr. Cecília Tomori (Johns Hopkins University), is the need to engage in conversations across the subdisciplines of anthropology. Featured in the volume are chapters on the bioarchaeology of reproduction (Betsinger), the sociolinguistics of pregnancy (Han), and the culture and biology of human infant sleep (Rudzik).
    • Sounding Out Oneonta: Public Interest Programming on WONY 90.9 FM Student Radio

      Bottomley, Andrew (2021)
      WONY is the student-run college radio station at SUNY Oneonta. A noncommercial educational (NCE) radio station licensed by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC), it is licensed to the State University of New York (SUNY) and assigned the call sign “WONY” and the frequency 90.9 FM. Though operated as a student club through the Student Association (SA), WONY’s status as a federally regulated broadcaster serving the larger Oneonta region makes it a rather unique institution within the college. Among other requirements, WONY has a legal mandate to “transmit educational, cultural, and entertainment programs to the public.” In particular, the FCC requires each broadcast station to air a reasonable amount of programming responsive to significant community needs, issues, and problems as determined by the station. WONY must report compliance with this public interest mandate every quarter, and the successful delivery of these responsive programs is among the primary materials the FCC takes into consideration when the radio station’s broadcast license is renewed every eight years. Producing this type of community-oriented programming, though, requires a considerable commitment of time, energy, and ideas – resources that can be hard to come by when WONY is volunteer-run and student involvement is strictly extracurricular. This presentation investigates a few solutions that SUNY Oneonta faculty and students have devised to help WONY create issue-responsive programming that fulfills this public interest obligation while also making WONY an even more effective voice for the college. These include classroom-based projects such as the Oneonta Voices podcast, which students in Dr. Andrew Bottomley’s MCOM 340 Participatory Media class produced in 2018-19. Other students in the Media Studies program’s MCOM 253 Introduction to Audio Production have been making public service announcements (PSAs), which are short messages for nonprofit organizations and social causes that are aired on WONY every hour. Student club members have also created a series of person-on-the-street style interview segments called “WONY Asks,” where they choose a topic of concern to the campus community and then interview a cross-section of strangers in public spaces on campus to get their perspectives on the subject. Students have also been recording brief inspirational messages from faculty – advice on college, careers, and life – that are then interspersed into regular broadcasts. This presentation will offer brief audio examples of this creative programming that WONY is producing for the education and enjoyment of the SUNY Oneonta campus and surrounding communities.
    • SUNY Oneonta Textbook Survey: Undergraduate Students’ Preferences and Behaviors on the Use of Textbooks and Course Materials

      Beck, Ed; Jensen, Jennifer; Strauss, Jade; Cordice-Little, Britney (2021)
      Textbooks represent the fastest growing price tag for college students among many rising college expenses. In addition, the market for course materials has become more complicated with the rise of rentals, digital textbooks, online homework systems, and a diverse world of vendors from which to choose. This poster describes the results of a student-led survey about undergraduate students’ preferences and behaviors related to the attainment and use of textbooks and course materials. The survey asked how SUNY Oneonta students are experiencing the impact of rising textbook costs and increasingly complicated decisions. We explore how those results can inform our campus Open Educational Resources (OER) Initiative and other SUNY student success programs.
    • Surviving Through Your SCARs: Humanistic Strategies for a World Gone Wild

      Green, Michael (2021)
      The aim of this work is to answer two questions: According to the humanities, what kind of world do we inhabit, and what strategies can the humanities provide for surviving and thriving in this world? We inhabit a world of volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity, which in our current situation manifests itself in international instability due to the decline of Western empires, social instability due to racial conflicts, financial instability due to an unstable currency, and economic instability due to the transition into the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Such volatility creates emotional scars, and the humanistic strategies for managing these scars are Self-Reliance, Creative Problem Solving, Adaptability, and Resilience (SCARs).
    • Together We Grow: A Thriving Community Garden Initiative in the City of Oneonta

      Virk-Baker, Mandeep (2021)
      The City of Oneonta has a higher prevalence of food insecurity (12.0% vs. 10.5%), and a higher poverty rate (29.0% vs. 13.7%) as compared to the US. Majority of the city population (53%) lives in food desserts that are lacking access to fresh and healthful whole foods. Purpose of the project was to test the feasibility of Oneonta Community Gardens Initiative and provide opportunity for the residents to grow healthful and affordable fresh food and participate in creating green space. Methods: The City of Oneonta donated land and provided needed resources for the community garden. The garden is divided into 30 spaces and has options for handicap accessibility. Various stakeholders including local elected officials, city employees, residents, and local volunteer groups worked collaboratively for setting up the garden. The City of Oneonta created guidelines for organic-only gardening, and an application process for the residents to obtain permits for gardening at the community garden. Results: The Oneonta Community Gardens initiative began with 30 organic gardening spaces. A total of 12 households participated in 2018, and the participation increased to 22 households in 2019. The participation during the COVID19 pandemic reached its full capacity with 30 households in 2020, and 30 households participating for the 2021 gardening season. Conclusion: The initiative has been well received by the local community and demonstrates the feasibility of a successful community garden. The project could serve as an example for other cities and municipalities with high food insecurity and areas with high poverty rates.
    • What Is the SUNY Oneonta Faculty Fellows Program?

      Aucoin, Brendan; Bishop, Jacqueline S. (Bruscella); Fall, Leigh; Montoya, Maria (2021)
      The Faculty Fellows (previously called Administrative Fellows) Program is a pilot program in Academic Affairs that addresses faculty leadership, institutional needs, and collaboration. It provides professional development opportunities for those who are considering administrative roles, by developing focused projects. The projects are addressing SUNY Oneonta’s mission critical goals in experiential learning, student engagement and retention, and inclusivity/diversity. The faculty fellows are an interdisciplinary team that strengthen the roles and offices of the academic deans and library director by integrating the academic schools/units. The 2021-2022 cohort includes Brendan Aucoin (Milne Library), Jacqueline (Bruscella) Bishop (Communication and Media), Leigh M. Fall (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences), and Maria Cristina Montoya (Foreign Languages and Literatures). Brendan is working on a series of projects related to highlighting SUNY Oneonta research and scholarship in the Milne Library. Among these are the development of the Library Special Researcher program for students and creating more opportunities to showcase faculty scholarship in the library. Jackie is working on a series of interrelated initiatives centered on experiential learning. Through cross-campus collaborations. Jackie's project seeks to a) increase access to on-campus and local internship opportunities, b) improve student, faculty, and site-supervisor understanding and use of Handshake, and c) strengthen career readiness programming for students, particularly those studying in the liberal arts. Leigh is working on two projects for the School of Sciences. One project is researching mechanisms of how interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary courses and research happens within the school, highlighting potential barriers and opportunities. The other project is researching past and current STEM experiential learning opportunities to help faculty provide productive experiences for students. MC is working on three projects: first the internationalization of the School of EHESS, including a focus on Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) as a platform; second, developing the curricula and partnerships for the Bilingual Education graduate program; third, diverse faculty retention.