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dc.contributor.authorFaraone, Stephen V.
dc.contributor.authorWilens, Timothy E.
dc.contributor.authorPetty, Carter
dc.contributor.authorAntshel, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorBiederman, Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-18T18:28:19Z
dc.date.available2021-10-18T18:28:19Z
dc.date.issued2007-01
dc.identifier.issn1055-0496
dc.identifier.eissn1521-0391
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10550490601082767
dc.identifier.pii10.1080/10550490601082767
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/6983
dc.description.abstractDiagnosing ADHD in adults is difficult when the diagnostician cannot establish an onset prior to the DSM-IV criterion of age seven or if the number of symptoms does not achieve the DSM threshold for diagnosis. These diagnostic issues are an even larger concern for clinicians faced with adults with substance use disorders (SUD). The present study compared four groups of adults: full ADHD subjects who met all DSM-IV criteria for childhood onset ADHD, late onset ADHD subjects who met all criteria except the age at onset criterion, subthreshold ADHD subjects who did not meet full symptom criteria, and nonADHD subjects who did not meet any of the above criteria. Diagnoses were by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, and the Drug Use Severity Index (DUSI) was used for self-report of substance use. Cigarette and marijuana use was significantly greater in all ADHD groups relative to non-ADHD controls. Although usage rates of other drugs failed to reach significance, the ADHD groups were more likely to have used each drug (except alcohol) compared with the non-ADHD group. The late onset and full ADHD groups were more likely to have endorsed ever having a problem due to use of cigarettes, alcohol, or marijuana and reported more trouble resisting use of drugs or alcohol. The full ADHD group was more likely than the other groups to have reported ‘‘getting high’’ as their reason for using their preferred drug. Adults with ADHD have elevated rates of substance use and related impairment. Data about late onset ADHD provides further support for the idea that the DSM-IV age at onset criterion is too stringent. In contrast, subthreshold ADHD seems to be a milder form of the disorder, or perhaps a heterogeneous group of true ADHD cases and false positives.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Mental healthen_US
dc.subjectClinical Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectMedicine (miscellaneous)en_US
dc.titleSubstance Use among ADHD Adults: Implications of Late Onset and Subthreshold Diagnosesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleAmerican Journal on Addictionsen_US
dc.source.volume16
dc.source.issues1
dc.source.beginpage24
dc.source.endpage34
dc.description.versionAMen_US
refterms.dateFOA2008-01-30T00:00:00Z
dc.description.institutionUpstate Medical Universityen_US
dc.description.departmentPsychiatryen_US
dc.description.degreelevelN/Aen_US


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