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dc.contributor.advisorDaly, John P.
dc.contributor.authorFalter, Benjamin
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-08T14:17:16Z
dc.date.available2021-09-08T14:17:16Z
dc.date.issued5/9/2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/6926
dc.description.abstractDuring the American Civil War, the southern states declared themselves an independent nation called the Confederate States of America. After the Civil War ended, the Confederacy was reabsorbed into the United States. However, its memory and icons continued to be perceived separately. The current debate over whether Confederate icons, such as the so-called "Confederate Flag," Robert E. Lee, and Nathan Bedford Forrest, should be considered symbols of heritage or of hate reflects the controversial nature of Confederate Memory. However, the true history of these Confederate icons is lost in the modern debate, especially among those espousing the heritage position. If one examines the history behind these icons, one will find that they are truly symbols of racism hiding under a thin veneer of "heritage."
dc.subjectAmerican Civil War
dc.subjectConfederates States Of America
dc.subjectRobert E. Lee
dc.subjectNathan Bedford Forrest
dc.subjectConfederate Flag
dc.subjectRacism
dc.titleHeritage or Hate?: An Examination of Americans’ Popular Memory of the Confederate States of America and Its Icons
dc.typethesis
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-08T14:17:16Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitleSenior Honors Theses
dc.contributor.organizationThe College at Brockport
dc.languate.isoen_US


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