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dc.contributor.authorMcCaffery, Christine
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T22:05:28Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T22:05:28Z
dc.date.issued5/1/1981
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/6106
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine if the visual perception limitations of identified children affected their word recognition skills. Variables included a comparison of children with and without visual perception limitations and response to both abstract and concrete words. The questions explored in this investigation were: 1. Do children with visual perception limitations have more difficulty recognizing abstract words than concrete words? 2. Do children identified as having visual perception limitations have more difficulty recognizing abstract words than children without visual perception limitations? 3. Do children identified as having visual perception limitations have more difficulty recognizing concrete words than children who did not have such visual perception limitations? The subjects for this study were fifty second grade children from an upstate New York community. An investigator-developed visual perception test identified the subjects with visual perception limitations. The subjects were then divided into two groups of twenty-five children each. A vocabulary list of fifteen concrete and fifteen abstract words were presented to the children in the study. A comparison was made between the two groups of subjects. Statistical analysis from t-test for dependent means showed that children with visual perception limitations were able to recognize concrete words more successfully than abstract words. Using a t-test for independent means, no significant difference was found in the recognition of abstract words between children with visual perception limitations and children without visual perception limitations. Results also showed a significant difference in the recognition of concrete words favoring children without visual perception limitations when compared with children with visual perception limitations when using a t-test for independent means to analyze the data. Differences found in word recognition skills between the children point to the need for differential instruction in reading during the primary grades. It has also been noted that visual perception testing is a necessary and valuable tool for early detection of visual perception limitations of children in the classroom. Conclusions indicate the need for more teacher information about visual perception limitations, diagnostic testing, and also methods for remediation in the classroom.
dc.subjectReading Comprehension
dc.subjectAbstract Words
dc.subjectConcrete Words
dc.subjectVisual Impairment
dc.subjectVisual Limitation
dc.titleAn Investigation of the Relationship Between Word Recognition Skills and Children with Visual Perception Limitations
dc.typethesis
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T22:05:28Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.description.departmentEducation and Human Development
dc.description.degreelevelMaster of Science in Education (MSEd)
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitleEducation and Human Development Master's Theses
dc.contributor.organizationThe College at Brockport
dc.languate.isoen_US


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