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dc.contributor.advisorTownsend, Lee Ann
dc.contributor.authorOliver, Rebecca
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T21:43:10Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T21:43:10Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-18
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/5104
dc.description.abstractThe special education population in schools in the United States shows a significant disproportionality between male and female students. Often special education referrals are made due, in part, to student underperformance in reading and basic literacy skills. Using past studies regarding best practices for literacy instruction, gender studies, and special education, the current study looks to understand what teachers can do to eliminate the inequality in special education referrals between genders in school-aged children. Results suggest that female students begin school with a head start to their male counterparts, and because of this, typically do well in the earlier grades in which literacy skills are emphasized. However, further research suggests differences in behavioral and societal ideals create this differentiation.
dc.subjectSpecial Education
dc.subjectClassification
dc.subjectGender
dc.subjectBoys
dc.subjectLiteracy Practices
dc.titleChanging the Mindset: A Look at Current Literacy Practices and How These Are Failing Boys
dc.typethesis
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T21:43:11Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.description.departmentEducation and Human Development
dc.description.degreelevelMaster of Science in Education (MSEd)
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitleEducation and Human Development Master's Theses
dc.contributor.organizationCollege at Brockport
dc.languate.isoen_US


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