Now showing items 1-20 of 6249

    • Virtual Connectedness: Working Together to Create a Companion Site for Spanish Phonetics & Phonology

      Escudero, Alejandra; Carbone, Alyssa; Barreca, Nicole (2021)
      The creation of a resource for students who are struggling or who simply want to practice their skills, that is accessible to all, is crucial, especially during the current times of virtual learning. We have created a companion site for the Spanish Phonetics & Phonology course for all SUNY students to use, as there is no resource of its kind, that is in the target language (Spanish) and is free of cost for all students and faculty. This will be a long-lasting tool that will allow for clarification of concepts, practice with engaging virtual exercises, and many opportunities to exercise skills and learning. After students learn concepts in class, they can access the companion site to further reinforce the comprehension of content, test what they know, see diagrams, practice, and get tips from other students who have already taken the course. We use h5p plugins in order to create different types of interactive activities for students in each module, which enhance the practice and learning experience. Each module in the site follows the same structure: 1) objectives of the module, 2) a short pre-reading quiz, 3) the content of the module, used to review concepts covered in class with examples and diagrams, 4) a “tips from other students” section so that students can learn from other students who already took the course and remember some tricks that will help them when preparing for exams, 5) a section for activities and practice, and 6) a summary of what was covered in the module. Two key resources that have been crucial to the creation of the companion site are Pressbooks and Monday.com. Pressbooks is the site used to create content and interactive activities. Monday.com is a site that allows for task management, progress tracking, making comments, and for student-faculty accountability. This companion site is an Open Educational Resource (OER) and is ADA-compliant, so that all students- regardless of income and potential disability- can access it for free. This resource also falls into the category of Open Pedagogy, with our companion site being one of the few Open Pedagogy projects across the SUNY system, where content is planned and created by students under faculty supervision.
    • The Impact of Ruling Family Board Members on the Performance of Commercial Banks

      Kienpin, Tee; Garas, Samy (Association for Accountancy & Business Affairs, 2021)
      We examine the impact of royal family involvement in the ownership and strategic management of commercial banks within the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) region. Existing finance literature has examined the impact of board members with political connections on bank performance to find mixed evidence of whether such connections have a positive or negative impact. However, such empirical studies have not been applied to the commercial banks of the GCC region. Our empirical analysis uses four separate metrics of performance to examine what influence board membership, board chairmanship and bank ownership shares by a royal family member has on bank performance. Our panel data analysis of GCC commercial bank data across six countries from 2013 to 2018 reveals that all three potential royal family roles exert a positive influence over GCC commercial bank performance. We derive these empirical results using relevant control variables at both the firm level and the industry level. Furthermore, we apply a system generalized moments of methods specification to our sample and find that these results are invariant to various specification robustness checks. Our results appear to support the Resource Dependency Theory (RDT), where the commercial banks rely on external resources to enhance financial performance.
    • Wildlife Response to Wildfire in a Northern New York Jack Pine Barrens

      Cave, Hannah; Adams, Matthew; Jaeger, Tristan; Peet, Taylor; Staats, Lloyd; Garneau, Danielle; Lesser, Mark (MDPI AG, 2021-05-25)
      Natural disturbances are an integral part of forested ecosystem function and successional path-ways. In many forested ecosystems, wildfires are critical to shaping composition and structure, which in turn has major implications for wildlife usage and behavior. In July 2018 a wildfire burned 225 ha of the Altona Flat Rock pine barrens in northern New York. This event presented the opportunity to study how wildlife respond to the immediate effects of disturbance in this unique habitat but also how that response would change through time as regeneration progressed. Game cameras were deployed from September 2018-September 2020 at two reference (unburned) and two disturbed (burned) sites within the pine barrens. We analyzed total and seasonal occurrences, to determine how usage differed between disturbed and reference conditions, and with time since disturbance. Additionally, for coyote (Canis latrans, Say), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus, Zimmermann), and snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus, Erxleben), we evaluated daily activity patterns and overlap to determine how predator-prey relationships differed between conditions, and with time since disturbance. Over 730 days a total of 1,048 wildlife occurrences were captured across 23 wildlife species. Fifty-seven percent of all occurrences were at reference sites with over 100 more occurrences than disturbed sites, however, differences were most pronounced immediately following the fire and overall occurrences have grown more similar between the sites over time. Specifically, deer and hare were found more often at reference sites immediately following the fire, but shifted to using both conditions equally by the first growing season. Habitat overlap among sympatric prey (deer, hare) can be explained by understory regeneration increasing foraging opportunities and concealment cover in the disturbed condition, while predators (coyotes) tracked prey availability regardless of the habitat condition. This study provides wildlife management guidance on habitat use and response to disturbance for this unique sandstone pavement barrens.
    • Predicted Metabolic Function of the Gut Microbiota of Drosophila melanogaster

      Ankrah, Nana Y. D.; Barker, Brandon E.; Song, Joan; Wu, Cindy; McMullen, John G.; Douglas, Angela E. (American Society for Microbiology, 2021-06-29)
      An important goal for many nutrition-based microbiome studies is to identify the metabolic function of microbes in complex microbial communities and their impact on host physiology. This research can be confounded by poorly understood effects of community composition and host diet on the metabolic traits of individual taxa. Here, we investigated these multiway interactions by constructing and analyzing metabolic models comprising every combination of five bacterial members of the Drosophila gut microbiome (from single taxa to the five-member community of Acetobacter and Lactobacillus species) under three nutrient regimes. We show that the metabolic function of Drosophila gut bacteria is dynamic, influenced by community composition, and responsive to dietary modulation. Furthermore, we show that ecological interactions such as competition and mutualism identified from the growth patterns of gut bacteria are underlain by a diversity of metabolic interactions, and show that the bacteria tend to compete for amino acids and B vitamins more frequently than for carbon sources. Our results reveal that, in addition to fermentation products such as acetate, intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, including 2-oxoglutarate and succinate, are produced at high flux and cross-fed between bacterial taxa, suggesting important roles for TCA cycle intermediates in modulating Drosophila gut microbe interactions and the potential to influence host traits. These metabolic models provide specific predictions of the patterns of ecological and metabolic interactions among gut bacteria under different nutrient regimes, with potentially important consequences for overall community metabolic function and nutritional interactions with the host.
    • Succinate: a microbial product that modulates Drosophila nutritional physiology

      Zhang, Freya Q.; McMullen, John G.; Douglas, Angela E.; Ankrah, Nana Y.D. (Wiley, 2021-02-24)
      Gut microorganisms process food in animal guts and release many metabolic by-products, which are predicted to influence host physiological processes such as energy and lipid metabolism. Here, we investigate how succinate, a TCA cycle intermediate that is a major predicted release product of gut bacteria in Drosophila, influences the nutritional physiology of its Drosophila host. We administered succinate as a dietary supplement to microbe- free Drosophila, and quantified key nutritional indices. Dietary succinate significantly reduced fly lipid levels by up to ∼50%. This response was not replicated in parallel experiments conducted with dietary fumarate supplement, indicating that it could not be attributed to a general effect of TCA intermediates. We hypothesize that microbe-derived succinate may contribute to the reduced lipid content of Drosophila bearing gut bacteria, relative to axenic Drosophila. More generally, this study high- lights the importance of microbial-derived metabolites as regulators of host metabolism.
    • Can athletes be tough yet compassionate to themselves? Practical implications for NCAA mental health best practice no. 4

      Stamatis, Andreas; Deal, Paul J.; Morgan, Grant B.; Forsse, Jeffrey S.; Papadakis, Zacharias; McKinley-Barnard, Sarah; Scudamore, Eric M.; Koutakis, Panagiotis (Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2020-12-31)
      Recent tragic events and data from official NCAA reports suggest student-athletes’ wellbeing is compromised by symptoms of mental health (MH) disorders. Self-compassion (SC) and mental toughness (MT) are two psychological constructs that have been shown effective against stressors associated with sports. The purpose of this study was to investigate SC, MT, and MH in a NCAA environment for the first time and provide practical suggestions for MH best practice No.4. In total, 542 student-athletes participated across Divisions (Mage = 19.84, SD = 1.7). Data were collected through Mental Toughness Index, Self-Compassion Scale, and Mental Health Continuum–Short Form. MT, SC (including mindfulness), and MH were positively correlated. Males scored higher than females on all three scales. No differences were found between divisions. SC partially mediated the MT-MH relationship, but moderation was not significant. Working towards NCAA MH best practice should include training athletes in both MT and SC skills (via mindfulness).
    • High-Intensity Interval Exercise Performance and Short-Term Metabolic Responses to Overnight-Fasted Acute-Partial Sleep Deprivation

      Papadakis, Zacharias; Forsse, Jeffrey S.; Stamatis, Andreas (MDPI AG, 2021-04-01)
      People practicing high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) fasted during the morning hours under a lack of sleep. Such a habit may jeopardize the health benefits related to HIIE and adequate sleep. Fifteen habitually good sleeper males (age 31.1 ± 5.3 SD year) completed on a treadmill two isocaloric (500 kcal) HIIE sessions (3:2 min work:rest) averaged at 70% VO2reserve after 9–9.5 h of reference sleep exercise (RSE) and after 3–3.5 h of acute-partial sleep deprivation exercise (SSE). Diet and sleep patterns were controlled both 1 week prior and 2 days leading up to RSE and SSE. HIIE related performance and substrate utilization data were obtained from the continuous analysis of respiratory gases. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA with the baseline maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) and body fat percentage (BF%) as covariates at p < 0.05. No difference was observed in VO2max, time to complete the HIIE, VE, RER, CHO%, and FAT% utilization during the experimental conditions. Whether attaining an adequate amount of sleep or not, the fasted HIIE performance and metabolism were not affected. We propose to practice the fasted HIIE under adequate sleep to receive the pleiotropic beneficial effects of sleep to the human body.
    • Baseball performance via the lens of anthropometric testing, fitness metrics, and statistics: a longitudinal cross-sectional study

      Papadakis, Zacharias; Padgett, Robert N.; Stamatis, Andreas; Karasch, Richard A. (Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health), 2021-03)
      Background: Anthropometric testing (AT) and fitness metrics (FM) are contributing factors for success in sports. Limited evidence exists regarding longitudinal baseball AT or FM roles on baseball performance statistics (PS). AT, FM, and PS associations were examined for 5 yr to create a performance model. Methods: Eighty collegiate Division I players participated in this study. Height, mass, and body fat percentage (BF%) were selected as AT variables of interest. Grip strength (GS), one repetition maximum squat (1RMSQ), and vertical-jump height were selected for FM. Batting average percentage (AVG), slugging percentage (SLG), on-base percentage (OBP) baseball statistics were selected as offensive PS. Earned run average (ERA), batting average against percentage (B/ AVG), and strike-out per innings pitched for 9 innings (SO/IP)*9 were selected for defensive PS. Results: Offensive (r=−0.15, P<0.005; rs=−0.17, P<0.001) and defensive (r =−0.253, P<0.001; rs=−0.314, P<0.001) statistics correlated with BF%. Offensive (r =0.26, P<0.001; rs=0.43, P<0.001) and defensive (r =0.39, P <0.001) statistics correlated with GS. Offensive (r =0.26, P<0.001; rs=0.43, P <0.001) and defensive (r =0.27, P <0.001) statistics correlated with 1RMSQ. Offensive statistics AVG (R2=0.48) and SLG (R2=0.46) were explained by 1RMSQ. For defensive statistics, 1RMSQ was the best fit for (SO/IP)*9 (R2=0.43) and B/AVG (R2=0.52), and GS was the best fit for ERA (R2=0.39). Squat and time interaction for B/AVG was significant (P=0.04). Conclusions: Baseball PS are associated with 1RMSQ and GS. Time moderates the effect of squat training on B/AVG. Pitchers need to include squats to lower their B/AVG. Coaches may focus on improving such FM variables and consider the time effect on selected FM that may affect PS.
    • Forest pests and wood pellets: A literature review of the opportunities and risks in the United States’ northeastern forests

      Neidermeier, Alex; Danks, Cecilia; Coleman, Kimberly; Wallin, Kimberly (Elsevier BV, 2020-11)
      As interest in alternatives to fossil fuels increases, low quality timber may become more attractive as feedstock material for biomass energy. This low-quality timber, referred to here as salvage wood, can be used to manu- facture wood pellets, a densified biomass energy product which can be used for electricity and heating. The process of converting wood to pellets also results in total pest mortality in the final product, an important consideration given wood pellet’s international market and global concerns about phytosanitation, or the risk of pest spread. However, there is still potential to spread pests in the wood pellet supply chain. To better under- stand the potential benefits for forest health and the phytosanitary risks of the use of salvaged wood in the wood pellet supply chain, our study systematically reviews the literature published between 2000 and 2018, gleaning applicable considerations for the northeastern United States (US), a region already affected by the highest density of damaging forest pests in the country and an up-tick in wood pellet use. Our review focuses on three pest species likely to incur considerable change in northeastern US forests: emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis or EAB; an exotic, invasive species), hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand, or HWA; an exotic, invasive species), and southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann, or SPB, a native species). Our review finds that wood pellets are being recognized as phytosanitary in their final form and that the forest health opportunities for the use of salvaged wood exist are beginning to be acknowledged in the region. However, our results also indicate that the spread of pests is still possible in the feedstock pre-treatment supply chain, which have yet to be directly addressed in US-related scientific literature. Our review concludes that further research and action on the phytosanitary risks in the supply chain focus on individual pest species behavior during harvesting, on-site comminution of feedstock material, and local processing at facilities within USDA APHIS (United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service) quarantine zones for maximum mitigation. The results of these considerations can accrue benefits for forest health, mitigate the spread of forest pests, and support the use of an alternative energy to fossil fuels in a changing climate.
    • Bringing the Forest Home: Lessons Learned during the COVID-19 Pandemic about E-Planning in Community Forestry Contexts

      Beck, Samantha; Coleman, Kimberly; Tapper, J Ethan (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2021-09-11)
      This paper examines “e-planning,” or the use of computer-based systems to conduct planning and decision-making, in the context of community forest management. E-planning is growing in the field of environmental planning, as it promises greater equity in terms of public participation. However, a lack of scholarly work exists on the applicability for forest planning. During the COVID-19 pandemic, county foresters and other natural resource professionals in Vermont turned to e-planning when safety restrictions limited their ability to engage in face-to-face efforts. This provided an opportunity to collect empirical data about the potential for e-planning to support the public engagement process in the context of forest planning. We provide an overview of e-planning theory and examine data from Vermont to explore the promise of e-planning for forest management. We make recommendations about the applicability of e-planning in the context of forest planning, and highlight areas for future research to investigate.
    • Melange fabrics of the northern Appalachians

      Caine, Jonathan Saul (1991-05)
      Melange and phacoidal or scaly cleavage have been observed in both ancient and modern day accretionary tectonic environments throughout the world. This unique structural fabric reflects common structural elements from microscopic to macroscopic scales of observation and from one region to another. Structures include: distinct individual polyhedral phacoids, phacoidal shear-aparts, rootless dismembered bedlets of silt, isolated rootless near isoclinal fold noses, seams of preferentially oriented phyllosilicates that generally parallel the foliation, abundant pyrite that ranges in form from large globular masses to small euhedral framboids, and calcite present as foliation-parallel veins and as intergranular precipitates. The characteristic phacoid shape is defined by an anastomosing network of regularly intersecting curviplanar slip surfaces whose average orientation defines a macroscopic and microscopic foliation. In three dimensions these intersections form individual phacoidal forms. The relationship of these lensoid shapes to their internal geometry and the overall stress environment in which they form is the least understood aspect of this fabric. By comparing structural data from Taconic melange in western Newfoundland, Canada and eastern New York State insight into the nature of the fabric has been gained. Three primary analytical techniques were used to obtain data for this study: microstructural analysis of thin-sections, analysis of individual phacoid specimens, and manual dissection of large hand samples. Because of the friable nature of phacoidally cleaved material, a method of dissection was developed to measure structural data such as phacoidal surface orientations and associated slickenline orientations. Data collected from these techniques was analyzed using standard stereographic methods using the computer program Orient. In addition, a stress analysis of the foliation and lineation data was done. The results of these analyses suggest that the lensoid shape of individual phacoids is significant at all scales, similar structures are observed from one location to another, and from ancient to modern day tectonic environments. In addition, the presence of phacoidal cleavage in shales and shaly sediments can be used, along with other geologic parameters, as a genetic indicator of the accretionary environment. The distinct phacoidal shape ranges from highly euhedral polyhedrons with triclinic symmetry to subhedral faceted forms that are best described as elongated oblate ellipsoids. These shapes are interpreted to reflect the internal arrangement of seams of preferentially oriented phyllosilicate grains that have apparently undergone rotation, intergranular particulate flow, and possibly recrystallization in an environment of high shear stress, flattening, and progressive deformation. In addition, conjugate microfaulting along phacoidal surfaces that generally parallel the seams acts in concert with the above mechanisms to accommodate the deformation in the accretionary prism environment. The presence of abundant precipitates of pyrite and calcite are interpreted to reflect dewatering processes that are syntectonic to the development of the fabric in the accretionary environment. The results of the stress analysis has demonstrated that the fabric axes, as defined by individual phacoid axes which are generally symmetrical to the axes of the fabric as a whole, are symmetrical to the principal stress axes. Comparison of the geometric, and petrographic data with the stress analysis data confirms this relationship and places the maximum principal stress at a high angle to the average orientation of the dominant foliation. This further indicates that the fabric is the result of shortening symmetrical to the fabric. The state of strain in phacoidally cleaved shales remains ambiguous because of a lack of strain markers and because there is no prefabric frame of reference with which to evaluate it.
    • Rigid Flexibility: Seeing the Opportunities in “Failed” Qualitative Research

      CohenMiller, Anna S.; Schnackenberg, Heidi; Demers, Denise (SAGE Publications, 2020-10-19)
      This article highlights an experience of “failing” within a qualitative research study. Specifically, the authors speak to the failure of recruiting participants in conducting synchronous video and telephone interviews. Drawing from literature in business and examples from research method texts to demonstrate the cross-disciplinary concerns and insights of failure within one’s work, the authors discuss how failure can be reframed as opportunity through the lens of “rigid flexibility” and the innovative steps they implemented. Providing additional insight into the process of framing and reframing failure in research, the authors integrate poetic inquiry as a tool for reflection to highlight their process and suggested steps for new researchers. The authors argue that researchers can approach studies with the idea that failures in the planning and/or execution can lead to opportunities and new insights.
    • There is nothing new under the sun

      Stengler, Erik (Sissa Medialab, 2021-09)
      A novel and original take on the history of popular science showcases that making science accessible to the public has been part of scientific activity since ancient times. Under this lens, and through twenty-one case studies, current trends such as sci-art and virtual technology can be seen as part of a continuum that was already present in the use of aesthetic and rhetorical tools by the ancient Greeks. Thanks to a careful curation of the collection of texts, this volume as a whole offers more than the sum of its parts (chapters).
    • A wormy world: Summer research in fish parasitology at SUNY Oneonta

      Reyda, Florian; Mendez, Gustavo; Curtin, Claire; Whitcomb, Hannah; Fleming, Morgan; Bulmer, Emily; Nielsen, Emma; Reyda, Florian (2021)
      During the summer of 2021 four students – Gustavo Mendez, Hannah Whitcomb, Morgan Fleming and Emily Bulmer – assisted Florian Reyda with a variety of endeavors as part of the fish parasitology research program. Students were involved in both field work and laboratory work. A major focus was a study of the parasites of Oneida Lake fishes here in New York. Oneida Lake was the focus of a set of classic parasitological studies (Van Cleave & Mueller, 1932) that took place nearly 100 years ago. These studies are widely known within the field of fish parasitology (see Scholz & Choudhury, 2014) because they included descriptions of 33 new species of parasitic worms, from a diversity of fish species. Thus, Oneida Lake is the type locality (i.e., original place of discovery) for 33 species of parasitic worms—a truly remarkable number! Reyda and students conducted fish parasite survey of Oneida Lake fishes during the first half of the summer. The overall objective of that survey is to identify how many of the previously discovered 33 species of parasitic worms are still present today. They collected a diversity of fish from one particular stream, Chittenango Creek, but also examined a diversity of fish that were provided by colleagues at the Cornell Biological Field Station. Reyda and students also examined fish samples from Otsego Lake and Moe Pond—two water bodies that are accessible via the SUNY Oneonta Biological Field Station. In August, Reyda and three students traveled to Douglas Lake Michigan in order to sample fish parasites there. The specific objective was to collect two species of thorny-headed worms (acanthocephalans), from their type locality. One of those species, Octospinifer macilentus was the specific focus of one of the students in the lab, Claire Curtin. The survey work was an extra challenge because the main fish of interest, white sucker, were few and far between in the streams, and it took miles of stream walking with a backpack shocker in order to encounter enough white sucker to constitute a decent sample size. We obtained one of the two target species, but unfortunately not the one Claire needed for her project. In addition to field work, during summer students performed fish dissections in the lab and isolated parasites that they then prepared as permanent microscope slides. This aspect of the summer work is very important because it results in a set of study specimens that students can use for independent study projects during the upcoming academic year.
    • Research catches up with the unstoppable reality of science communication through online video

      Stengler, Erik; Sherman, Hannah (Sissa Medialab, 2019-02)
      While online video has become synonymous with web-based searches for the younger generations and the communication of science and technology has jumped on the bandwagon of this trend, too, relatively little research has been undertaken on this phenomenon. Over the last few years a small group of scholars from different institutions have independently begun to explore this field and to discuss their findings at international conferences, as reported previously in Allgaier and Geipel [2016] and in this journal in Stengler [2016]. Some articles have become essential references, such as Welbourne and Grant [2016] and Muñoz Morcillo, Czurda and Robertson-von Trotha [2016]. While there was an e-book published in German on the topic [Körkel and Hoppenhaus, 2016], and an extensive review will also be included in the Second International Handbook of Internet Research [Allgaier, 2020, to appear], the book Communicating Science and Technology Through Online Video edited by Bienvenido León and Michael Bourk is a timely arrival in the academic literature and shows that a critical mass of research in the field is being reached.
    • 3-D printed heterogenous substrate bandpass filters

      Nesheiwat, Issa (2021-09)
      With the demand for increasing frequencies in today’s communications systems, compact integrated circuits are challenging to achieve. Compact filters have typically been realized by modifying the circuit design including using LC resonators, defective ground structures, and adjusting the length ratios of resonators. Heterogenous substrates with controlled regions of dielectric loading offer a new design approach when it comes to manufacturing an RF component. In this thesis, additive manufacturing is used to selectively place low-K and high-K dielectric materials to achieve a compact form factor, improved bandwidth, and higher suppression in re-entry modes. First, microstrip coupled strip lines are simulated to model the basic coupling effects of loading a substrate. Next, three 2.45GHz parallel coupled bandpass microstrip filters are designed with differing substrates: low-K, high-K and high-K loaded to analyze the impact of loading within the substrate. The filter substrates are manufactured using a dual-extrusion FDM 3-D printer to combine both dielectrics, low-K ABS, and high-K PrePerm ABS1000, into a single heterogeneous substrate. Compared to the low-K dielectric alternative, the high-K loaded filter demonstrated a 30.8% decrease in length, while maintaining similar bandwidth and suppression of re-entry modes. Compared to the high-K filter, the high-K loaded filter showed a 9.4dB reduction in re-entry mode suppression, while maintaining similar footprint size.
    • Analysis of ground plane size, topography and location on a monopole antenna's performance utilizing 3-D printing

      Ciraco, Vito (2021-09)
      The monopole antenna is widely used in communication applications and is typically mounted on various surfaces that act as ground planes; a prime example being the roof of a car. The shape of the ground plane can drastically change the patterns of the electromagnetic radiation of a monopole antenna as well as its RF performance. Extensive work [1,12-13] has been done on the numerical modeling of arbitrarily shaped ground planes. However, due to their geometric complexity, there is very little work reported on the practical testing component of physical antennas with these obscure ground plane structures. This thesis illustrates how the additive manufacturing process presented can be used to physically realize arbitrarily shaped ground planes and provides a low-cost process to verify the numerical model. Ground Planes were modified while maintaining the same antenna length to evaluate the impact on antenna performance. The antenna was not optimized or changed to a standard antenna design. Varying radius spherical ground planes are modelled, as well as modified ground plane structures to evaluate the impact of the ground plane on a 1.3GHz monopole antenna's performance and in some cases to modify the antenna's performance in terms of gain, bandwidth, and radiation pattern. Designs such as the planar ground with horn was found to enhance monopole bandwidth by more than 5 times that of a standard planar ground but significantly deteriorate the antenna's radiation pattern. Moreover, complex geometry such as the fin sphere ground plane offered a 25% increase in gain relative to the standard sphere ground. Designs like the edge-mounted sphere can offer directive gain and radiation characteristics simply by altering the antennas' location mount location with respect to its ground plane. The techniques presented in this thesis offer new ways of producing 3-D printed ground planes for RF applications that are easier to manufacture, lighter in weight, and can enhance antenna performance over their conventional counterparts.
    • Sonia Sotomayor’s Legal Phenomenology, Racial Policing, and the Limits of Law

      McMahon, John (University of Chicago Press, 2021-10-01)
      Sonia Sotomayor’s dissent in the Fourth Amendment case Utah v. Strieff (2016) received a great deal of media attention, particularly for its citations to prominent Black political thinkers and its evocations of Black Lives Matter. This article interprets Justice Sotomayor’s dissent as constructing an emergent legal theory that incorporates Black Lives Matter and the experiences of people of color subject to being stopped and searched into the core of Fourth Amendment jurisprudence. In contrast to Clarence Thomas’s abstracted majority opinion, I argue Sotomayor contests the meaning of law’s relations to subjects, bringing the feeling, moving, restrained, invaded, prodded, shaped, habitual, racialized subject of the police stop into Supreme Court legal reasoning. In tension with Sotomayor’s phenomenological alternative are structural and institutional constraints on the liberatory possibilities for any Supreme Court dissent, particularly one focused on racial injustice. The article argues for recognizing both the generativity of the emergent legal phenomenology and the constraints on its politics in order to grapple with the potential for legal critique to surface from what Sotomayor calls law’s “cold abstractions.”
    • Performance: An Investigation of the Representation and Perception of Gender on Stage

      Kirckmire, Michael; Leary, Heather; The College at Brockport (2016-05-12)
      This honor’s thesis incorporates the author’s majors in Theatre and Women and Gender Studies to investigate how the genders are treated differently within society, how gender itself is constructed and perceived, along with the performative nature of gender. The author accomplished this through the inversion of gender roles in seven iconic plays, spanning in time from the 1600s to the 2000s, and followed each performance with a talkback session, where the audience and actors were able to offer insights both into the process and the perception of the audience. A final perspective was from the director’s point of view, through a discussion of the role of gender, both the actors and the characters’, and how they are perceived in a certain way, and the challenge to overcome those natural inclinations.
    • Physical Activity Guidelines for Children During and After Cancer Treatment

      Starkoff, Brooke; Astruc, Ellie; The College at Brockport (2016-05-13)
      The purpose of part one of this thesis was to synthesize previous research and information about cancer, children and cancer, exercise and cancer, and the long and short-term effects of cancer. After synthesizing previous research, the second part of this thesis was to integrate that research and create a set of safe and effective physical activity guidelines for children during and after cancer treatment. Lastly, a sample exercise prescription was created. This prescription was tailored for a fictional young child in a pediatric cancer rehabilitation program. The design of the pediatric cancer rehabilitation program was based on meeting the needs of a child, physically, emotionally, and socially.