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dc.contributor.advisorBrautigan, Walter F.
dc.contributor.advisorRibble, Robert B.
dc.contributor.advisorBaker, Patricia E.
dc.contributor.authorSentiff, Ann Marie
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T21:39:08Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T21:39:08Z
dc.date.issued7/1/1996
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/4909
dc.description.abstractStudy cards are recognized as a useful tool for building vocabulary and general comprehension in secondary school students. However, results from previous studies on their efficacy are mixed. Note-taking is often cited as a superior method, but secondary school students often lack the skills to create the most effective notes. Study cards are an alternative method to note-taking that is easier to utilize. The study investigates information recall in a group of 10th grade Regents biology students. Students in the study group utilize 25 study cards per unit, while the control group rely on other study methods of their own choosing. Based on a pre- and post-test evaluation of information recall, the results show only a minor improvement using study cards over other methods. The results are not statistically significant, and therefore do not support the efficacy of study cards as an educational technology.
dc.subjectReading Comprehension
dc.subjectRecall
dc.subjectEducational Technologies
dc.titleDo Study Cards Really Work?
dc.typethesis
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T21:39:08Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.description.departmentEducation and Human Development
dc.description.degreelevelMaster of Science in Education (MSEd)
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitleEducation and Human Development Master's Theses
dc.languate.isoen_US


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