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dc.contributor.authorCatlin-Rakoski, Stephanie
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T21:05:25Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T21:05:25Z
dc.date.issued4/1/2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/4675
dc.description.abstractMental health professionals experience tremendous work-related stressors due to the emotionally demanding nature of the role they play in their client’s lives. The goal of this research was to identify relationships between a therapist’s level of engagement in self-care activities, and compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress. Forty-six mental health therapists were surveyed on their reported engagement in self-care activities and their overall professional quality of life. Relationships were found regarding an increase in selfcare and a decrease in the level of burnout and secondary traumatic stress a therapist reported, as well as a positive relationship between higher levels of self-care and an increase in compassion satisfaction.
dc.subjectCounselor Burnout
dc.subjectSelf-Care Activities
dc.subjectCompassion Satisfaction
dc.subjectBurnout
dc.subjectSecondary Traumatic Stress
dc.titleTherapist’s Perceptions of Self-Care
dc.typethesis
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T21:05:25Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.description.departmentCounselor Education
dc.description.degreelevelMaster of Science in Education (MSEd)
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitleCounselor Education Master's Theses
dc.contributor.organizationThe College at Brockport
dc.languate.isoen_US


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