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dc.contributor.authorLancaster, Jennifer E.
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-28T17:27:15Z
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-22T14:29:18Z
dc.date.available2013-03-28T17:27:15Z
dc.date.available2020-06-22T14:29:18Z
dc.date.issued28/03/2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/356
dc.description.abstractWith more English language learners (ELLs) entering schools, schools may not be prepared to service the unique needs of ELLs. This research examines the possible misconceptions teachers may have about ELLs in their schools. Twenty-eight teachers of varying ages, gender, and in-service years in nine different schools in western New York were surveyed regarding myths about ELLs. Teachers were asked whether or not they agreed with statements regarding myths they read or not. Fortunately for ELL students, many of the teachers surveyed stated that they did not believe many of the myths that were in the survey. This can mean several things for ELLs and the teachers. One conclusion may be that teachers are not feeling much added pressure from the ELL students but there may also not be many ELL students in the classrooms where the surveyed teachers are teaching. The use of a survey with a Likert scale, teachers were questioned about their feelings in regards to working with ELLs. With such a relative small sample of teachers, the results of this survey are not conclusive for the whole western New York area.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectEnglish language -- Study and teaching -- Foreign speakers.en_US
dc.subjectCommon fallacies.en_US
dc.subjectTeachers -- Training of -- New York (State).en_US
dc.titleMisconceptions that mainstream teachers in Western New York may have about English Language Learners.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-06-22T14:29:18Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY at Fredonia


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