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dc.contributor.authorBeardsley, Monroe C.
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T19:32:01Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T19:32:01Z
dc.date.issued1/1/1971
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/3386
dc.description.abstractHistorians sometimes say that one event or set of events made another event inevitable. This paper proposes an analysis of the concept of inevitability that is employed in such claims. To say that one event E made another event F inevitable is to say that: (1) E and F occurred, and in that temporal order, and (2) After E, and because of E, no action within the power of any living person or persons who desired F not to occur would have been followed by the nonoccurrence of F. One of the corollaries of this analysis is that anyone who asserts an inevitability statement is thereby committed to a true generalization to the effect that conditions like E cause conditions like F
dc.subjectPhilosophy Of History
dc.subjectInevitability
dc.subjectDeterminism
dc.titleInevitability in History
dc.typearticle
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T19:32:02Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.source.peerreviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitlePhilosophic Exchange
dc.contributor.organizationTemple University
dc.languate.isoen_US


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  • Philosophic Exchange
    Philosophic Exchange is published by the Center for Philosophic Exchange, at the College at Brockport. The Center for Philosophic Exchange was founded by SUNY Chancellor Samuel Gould in 1969 to conduct a continuing program of philosophical inquiry, relating to both academic and public issues. Each year the Center hosts four speakers, and each speaker gives a public lecture that is intended for a general audience. These lectures are then published in this journal.

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