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dc.contributor.authorDriver, Julia
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T19:31:43Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T19:31:43Z
dc.date.issued1/1/2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/3278
dc.description.abstractThe thesis of this paper is that there is an important asymmetry between a duty to love and a duty to not love: there is no duty to love as a fitting response to someone’s very good qualities, but there is a duty to not love as a fitting response to someone’s very bad qualities. The source of the asymmetry that I discuss is the two-part understanding of love: the emotional part and the evaluative commitment part. One cannot directly, or “at will,” control an emotional response, but one can undermine any commitment one would normally have under the circumstances. Thus, the feeling of love is not a duty, though being disposed to act a certain way with respect to the person one has the feelings for is controllable.
dc.subjectLove
dc.subjectEthics
dc.subjectObligation
dc.subjectDuty
dc.titleLove and Duty
dc.typearticle
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T19:31:43Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.source.peerreviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitlePhilosophic Exchange
dc.contributor.organizationWashington University, St. Louis
dc.languate.isoen_US


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  • Philosophic Exchange
    Philosophic Exchange is published by the Center for Philosophic Exchange, at the College at Brockport. The Center for Philosophic Exchange was founded by SUNY Chancellor Samuel Gould in 1969 to conduct a continuing program of philosophical inquiry, relating to both academic and public issues. Each year the Center hosts four speakers, and each speaker gives a public lecture that is intended for a general audience. These lectures are then published in this journal.

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