Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHawthorne, John
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T19:31:35Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T19:31:35Z
dc.date.issued12/1/2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/3229
dc.description.abstractThis paper will examine two strategies by which religious believers might attempt to defend the rationality of religious belief. The first strategy is a “fine tuning argument.” The main shortcoming of that strategy is that it ignores the crucial issue of the appropriate prior probabilities. The second strategy is what might be called a “trust” strategy. According to this strategy, a belief that is based on trusting someone who knows something is thereby also an instance of knowledge. This strategy might suffice in some respects, but it involves reliance on a mechanism that is doubtful as a prototype for all of our beliefs.
dc.subjectPhilosophy Of Religion
dc.subjectRationality Of Religious Belief
dc.subjectFine Tuning Argument
dc.subjectTestimony
dc.titleReligious Knowledge
dc.typearticle
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T19:31:35Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.source.peerreviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitlePhilosophic Exchange
dc.contributor.organizationOxford University
dc.languate.isoen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
phil_ex/vol37/iss1/1/fulltext ...
Size:
251.3Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Philosophic Exchange
    Philosophic Exchange is published by the Center for Philosophic Exchange, at the College at Brockport. The Center for Philosophic Exchange was founded by SUNY Chancellor Samuel Gould in 1969 to conduct a continuing program of philosophical inquiry, relating to both academic and public issues. Each year the Center hosts four speakers, and each speaker gives a public lecture that is intended for a general audience. These lectures are then published in this journal.

Show simple item record