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dc.contributor.authorDewart, Leslie
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T19:31:28Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T19:31:28Z
dc.date.issued1972-01-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/3192
dc.description.abstractThroughout much of the history of western philosophy, philosophers have assumed that speech is an outward sign of an inner, mental experience. However, in recent times, this assumption has been replaced by a growing realization that language plays a more active role in shaping our experience of reality. This realization opens up the possibility of a resolution of the apparent conflict between science and religion, through a transformation of the language that we use in relating to reality.
dc.subjectPhilosophy Of Religion
dc.subjectPhilosophy Of Language
dc.subjectScience And Religion
dc.titleLanguage and Religion
dc.typearticle
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T19:31:28Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.source.peerreviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitlePhilosophic Exchange
dc.contributor.organizationUniversity of Toronto
dc.languate.isoen_US


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  • Philosophic Exchange
    Philosophic Exchange is published by the Center for Philosophic Exchange, at the College at Brockport. The Center for Philosophic Exchange was founded by SUNY Chancellor Samuel Gould in 1969 to conduct a continuing program of philosophical inquiry, relating to both academic and public issues. Each year the Center hosts four speakers, and each speaker gives a public lecture that is intended for a general audience. These lectures are then published in this journal.

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