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dc.contributor.authorNielsen, Kai
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T19:31:18Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T19:31:18Z
dc.date.issued1970-01-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/3144
dc.description.abstractThe civil disobedient need not accept his punishment in order to demonstrate his commitment to the rule of law, and in some circumstances it would be inappropriate to do so. The use of violence is justified when and only when the pain, suffering, and injustice that we overcome thereby outweighs the pain, suffering and injustice that results from our actions. There have been circumstances in recent history in which, it is plausible to believe, these conditions were met.
dc.subjectCivil Disobedience
dc.subjectDemocracy
dc.subjectViolence
dc.subjectRevolution
dc.subjectEthics
dc.subjectPolitical Philosophy
dc.titleRemarks on Violence and Paying the Penalty
dc.typearticle
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T19:31:18Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.source.peerreviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitlePhilosophic Exchange
dc.contributor.organizationUniversity of Alberta, Calgary
dc.languate.isoen_US


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  • Philosophic Exchange
    Philosophic Exchange is published by the Center for Philosophic Exchange, at the College at Brockport. The Center for Philosophic Exchange was founded by SUNY Chancellor Samuel Gould in 1969 to conduct a continuing program of philosophical inquiry, relating to both academic and public issues. Each year the Center hosts four speakers, and each speaker gives a public lecture that is intended for a general audience. These lectures are then published in this journal.

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