Now showing items 21-40 of 383

    • FH2-dependent Localization of FHOD Formins in the Sarcomere

      Blystone, Scott; Hamilton, Elisabeth (2016)
      Formins are a class of actin nucleating factors containing a highly-conserved FH2 domain, which binds actin. There are 15 mammalian formin proteins in seven sub-families that have been found to nucleate, cap, sever, bundle, and polymerize linear actin filaments. An expression analysis of all 15 human formins across 22 different cell and tissue types showed high levels of expression for one formin sub-family in striated muscle: FHOD. While FHOD1 is highly expressed across many cell and tissue types, FHOD3 is only found at comparatively high levels in striated muscle cells. The mature structure of skeletal muscle is a very recognizable periodic repetition of filaments that allows muscles to contract. The sarcomere is the smallest contractile unit of skeletal muscle, with the two main filaments, the thick filament containing myosin, and the thin filament containing actin moving back and forth via the interaction of myosin heads with the thin filament, which allows muscles to contract. While the molecular functioning and the mature structure of skeletal muscle is well understood, the exact mechanism by which the sarcomere is assembled, and specifically, how the actin-core of the thin filament is formed and incorporated into the thin filament remains unknown. The high levels of expression of FHOD formins in striated muscle, combined with their ability to interact with filamentous actin warranted a closer look at FHOD1 and FHOD3 in the sarcomere. In this study we found that FHOD1 and FHOD3 have distinct sarcomeric localizations in C2C12 cells. FHOD1 localizes to the barbed end of the actin filament at the Z-disk and FHOD3 localizes to the pointed end of the actin filament near the center of the sarcomere. Full-length cDNA constructs for FHOD1 and FHOD3 were introduced into skeletal muscle cells, and we were able to recreate the endogenous localization of FHOD3 with the exogenous cDNA. The FHOD1 cDNA localized not to the barbed end of the actin filament, as endogenous FHOD1 does, but instead to the pointed end of the actin filament, where endogenous and exogenous FHOD3 were found. We hypothesized that FHOD binding to actin is dependent upon two highly conserved actin-binding sites in the FH2 domain. Mutations of the actin-binding residues in the FH2 domain impaired the actin-binding ability of both exogenous FHOD1 and FHOD3 and showed that the localization of FHOD1 and FHOD3 in the sarcomere is actin-binding dependent.
    • Functional Studies of Tumor Suppressor ECRG2 in the Regulation of Cancer Cell Death and Drug Resistance

      Huang, Ying; Lucchesi, Chris (2015)
      Esophageal Cancer Related Gene 2 (ECRG2) is a newer tumor suppressor whose mRNAhas previously been shown to be decreased in multiple human malignanceswhencompared to normal/adjacent tissues.Of importance, ECRG2 has previously been revealedto possess tumor suppressive attributes,including the ability to induce cell death in cancer cells. However, how ECRG2 is able to activate the apoptotic machinery has yet to be elucidated. In the present study,we highlight multiple angles that ECRG2 leverages in order to sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis. Moreover, we report for the first time,that ECRG2 protein expression in lung cancer patientsamples is lost/decreased in upwards of 90% ofthecancer tissues evaluatedcompared to normal tissue. Additionally, a single somatic point mutant found in patient tumor samples, V30E, was shown to lose tumor suppressive abilities and acquired resistance against multiple anticancer drugs. Our results demonstrate that ECRG2is upregulated in response to DNA damage, andis capable of inducing the activation of both caspase cascades (intrinsic and extrinsic) leadingto cancer cell death. We further illustratedthat ECRG2-mediated cell deathwasattributed to a reduction in the levels of apoptosis inhibitor, X chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). ECRG2 was revealedto regulate XIAP protein levels via RNA-binding protein,human antigen R(HuR).We further highlight that ECRG2 causes increased HuR ubiquitination,subsequently leading to its degradation. Thus, we demonstrate that ECRG2 sensitizescancer cells to apoptosis through the downregulation of HuR, and consequent downregulation of XIAP. Next, we have identified ECRG2 as a potent positive regulator of death receptor 5 (DR5) gene expression.ECRG2-mediated upregulation of DR5 was shown to be facilitated through the upregulation of tumor suppressor p53 and transcription factors ATF3 and NFⱪB. Together, in a cooperative fashion, increased levelsof p53, ATF3 and NFⱪB stimulateDR5 gene expression. Contrastingly, silencing of ECRG2 not only decreased the levels of NFⱪB and DR5, but also resulted in decreased cancer cell sensitivity to genotoxic stressandTRAIL treatment. Collectively,our work establishes that ECRG2 is capable of inducing apoptosis in cancer cells by increasing the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins, while also negatively influencing anti-apoptotic proteins.Further, the loss of ECRG2’stumor suppressive abilities, as wehaveshownby the loss of ECRG2in lung patient tumor samples,and through the somatic point mutantV30E, illuminates possible mechanismsin which cancer cells can acquiremultiple drug resistance.
    • DISSECTING THE ROLE OF YEAST RIM8 IN THEINTERNALIZATION OF THE PLASMA MEMBRANE PROTON PUMPPMA1

      Kane, Patricia; Shoniwa, Makandiwana (2013)
      The vacuolar A-TPase (V-ATPase) is a proton pump that is found ubiquitiously throughout the cells. It uses the hydrolysis of ATP to transport protons across membranes, thereby maintaining homeostatic pH. pH control in the cells of an organism is vital, a disturbance in cellular pH may be lethal. The maintenance of homeostatic pH within the cell appears to be a result of the interplay between V-ATPasesandproton exporters. In yeast and plants, the major proton exporter isthe plasma membrane proton exporter, Pma1. Pma1 is the transporter that is primarily involved in themaintenance of cytosolic pH. In cells in which the function of V-ATPase has been compromised (vma mutants) Pma1 is partially mislocalized.It is known thatmembrane transporterslacking the PY motifare endocytosed via the action of an Arrestin Related Trafficking (ART) protein, which translocates an E3 ligase into close proximity with the transporter, so as to allow for the ubiquitination of the transporter. Rim 8 is the ART protein (adaptor) that has been linked to the endocytosis of Pma1, along with E3 Ubiquitin ligase Rsp5. It is of interest to this project that Rim8 is well studied in its role as an adaptor in the alkaline ambient pH pathway. We thus propose that there may be crosstalk between the ambient pH pathway and the pathway that leads to the internalization of Pma1. Therefore, in this body of work we seek to find other players that may be involved in the Pma1 pathway, as well as to elucidate theareas of interaction between Rim8 and Pma1. Ourfinal goal isbringing a better understanding ofthe pathway that leads to the endocytosis of Pma1. To answer the question posed in this work we monitored the growth phenotype and the localization of Pma1 indouble mutants lacking both V-ATPase subunits and key players in the ambient pH pathway. In addition, we looked to see which cytosolically exposed terminal of Pma1 may be involved in theinteraction with Rim8. In yet another experiment, we mutatedRim8 so as to find which areas of the adaptor werevital for Pma1 internalization.Our results showed that other players tested in the Rim pathway(vma2∆rim20∆and vma2∆vps23∆)werenot required for Pma1 internalization. In addition we observed that mutations in Rim8 that compromise its function in the Rim pathway still allow Pma1 internalization, even though they show synthetic growth phenotypes with vma2∆ mutations. Two-hybrid assay could not detect thesites of interaction between Rim8 and Pma1 and newstrategies will be employed to determine these sites. Changes in electrophoretic mobility of Rim8 suggested that Rim8 undergoes posttranslational modifications, and showed differences in vma2∆mutants and WT mutants.
    • UNDERSTANDING THE CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATION 3 (CCM3)

      Howell, Brian; Mansaray-Storms, Zainab Y. (2016)
      Cerebral cavernous malformation 3 (CCM3) is one of three genes which when mutated plays a role in the neurovascular disease, cerebral cavernous malformation. Through a number of diverse binding partners, CCM3 plays a critical role in modulating several processes including cell survival, migration and vascular development. However, how CCM3 regulates many of these pathways remains unclear. An interaction with Stk25, a serine/threonine kinase with roles in cell polarity suggests CCM3 might play a role in the functions of Stk25. Here we characterize a role for CCM3 in cellular polarity. We identify a function for CCM3 in epithelial polarity through its association with and regulation of the conserved LKB1 signaling pathway. We find that CCM3 associates with STRADα, the regulatory pseudokinase of the LKB1 complex, and is necessary for LKB1-mediated cell polarization. To determine whether this novel association of CCM3 with STRADα and LKB1 pathway plays a role in CCM3-phenotype in endothelial cells, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of endothelial cells deficient in CCM3 protein. We identified changes in gene expression induced by CCM3 knockdown, particularly a significant downregulation in expression of cell adhesion molecules, a dysregulation of extracellular matrix signaling and an activation of p53 signaling pathway. This work defines a novel regulatory role for CCM3 in epithelial cell polarity and provides preliminary insights into downstream signaling pathways affected by the reduction of CCM3 in endothelial cells with potential impact in CCM disease pathogenesis.
    • MITOCHONDRIAL PROTEINS AS TUMOR MARKERS AND ANTI-CANCER DRUG TARGETS

      Sheikh, Saeed; Babbar, Mansi (2017)
      Cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Identification and characterization of novel biomarkers are expected to facilitate early diagnosis and improve prognosis of human malignancies. Increasing number of studies have linked tumor progression with metabolic reprogramming. However, the players involved are not fully discovered. Therefore, understanding the cancer cell plasticity may offer a successful approach for an anti-cancer strategy. In this regard, we report the functional characterization of Coiled-coil Helix Tumor and Metabolism 1 (CHTM1) and KM1 as important regulator of cancer cell metabolism.CHTM1 is localized in cytosol and mitochondrial inter-membrane spaceand regulates mitochondrial activity. Our results demonstrate that MIA40 appears to alterCHTM1 mitochondrial localizationand stability. Further, CHTM1 cysteineresiduesinvolved in CHTM1 folding modulatescellular distributionof CHTM1. Importantly, alterations in CHTM1 expression in cancer cells affect mitochondrial activity. Given thatmitochondria play an important role in cellular response to nutrient stress, we sought to analyze the role of CHTM1 in glucose/glutamine-deprived conditions. Wehave found thatCHTM1 deficiency enhancescancer cell sensitivityto glucose/glutamine starvation and metformin treatment. Additionally, increased sensitivity of CHTM1-deficient cells to metabolic stress could be in part due to inability to activate fatty acid oxidation. Further, targeting CHTM1 expression in cancer cells reduce fatty acid oxidation causing decrease in substrate availability under metabolic stress conditions. This can explain the increase in autophagy and protein catabolism in CHTM1-deficient cancer cells under metabolic stress conditions. Mechanistic studies suggest that CHTM1-mediated alterations in cancer cell metabolism under stress conditions involve modulation of PGC1 alpha-CREB-PKC signaling.We further demonstrate that under metabolic stress, CHTM1 deficiency activates p38-AIF1pathway leading to increased cell death. CHTM1 negatively regulates p38 and interacts with AIF1 alteringAIF1release frommitochondria under metabolic stress conditions.These findings are highly significant because alterations in cancer cell metabolism are linked to pathogenesis of cancer. Most importantly, multiple human malignancies associated with breast, colon and lung tissuesshow increase in CHTM1 expression. CHTM1 appears to be a high value tumor marker, that has the potential tofacilitate earlydiagnosis of human malignancies and could also serve as a target to develop novel therapeutics to manage human malignancies. In the second part of this manuscript, we report the characterization of a novel protein temporarily named as KM1. Our results indicate that KM1 is localized inthemitochondrial inner membrane and regulates mitochondrial activity. Metabolic stress-induced increased cell death is noted in KM1 knockout cancer cells, a finding consistent with the defective mitochondria in KM1-deficient cells. Our results further demonstrate that under metabolic stress KM1 regulates mitochondrial-mediated cell death. Most importantly, KM1 levels are upregulated in breast and lung cancer tissues.Collectively, our results suggest that CHTM1 and KM1 are novel proteins and are involved in regulating cancer cell metabolism.
    • Pediatric mania: a developmental subtype of bipolar disorder?

      Biederman, Joseph; Mick, Eric; Faraone, Stephen V; Spencer, Thomas; Wilens, Timothy E; Wozniak, Janet (Elsevier BV, 2000-09)
      Despite ongoing controversy, the view that pediatric mania is rare or nonexistent has been increasingly challenged not only by case reports, but also by systematic research. This research strongly suggests that pediatric mania may not be rare but that it may be difficult to diagnose. Since children with mania are likely to become adults with bipolar disorder, the recognition and characterization of childhood-onset mania may help identify a meaningful developmental subtype of bipolar disorder worthy of further investigation. The major difficulties that complicate the diagnosis of pediatric mania include: 1) its pattern of comorbidity may be unique by adult standards, especially its overlap with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, aggression, and conduct disorder; 2) its overlap with substance use disorders; 3) its association with trauma and adversity; and 4) its response to treatment is atypical by adult standards. Biol Psychiatry 2000;48: 458–466 © 2000 Society of Biological Psychiatry.
    • ADHD and DAT1: Further evidence of paternal over-transmission of risk alleles and haplotype

      Hawi, Z.; Kent, L.; Hill, M.; Anney, R.J.L.; Brookes, K.J.; Barry, E.; Franke, B.; Banaschewski, T.; Buitelaar, J.; Ebstein, R.; et al. (Wiley, 2009)
      We [Hawi et al. (2005); Am J Hum Genet 77:958–965] reported paternal over-transmission of risk alleles in some ADHD-associated genes. This was particularly clear in the case of the DAT1 3′-UTR VNTR. In the current investigation, we analyzed three new samples comprising of 1,248 ADHD nuclear families to examine the allelic over-transmission of DAT1 in ADHD. The IMAGE sample, the largest of the three-replication samples, provides strong support for a parent of origin effect for allele 6 and the 10 repeat allele (intron 8 and 3′-UTR VNTR, respectively) of DAT1. In addition, a similar pattern of over-transmission of paternal risk haplotypes (constructed from the above alleles) was also observed. Some support is also derived from the two smaller samples although neither is independently significant. Although the mechanism driving the paternal overtransmission of the DAT risk alleles is not known, these finding provide further support for this phenomenon.
    • IDENTIFICATION OF p53-MEDIATED NEUROGENOMIC RESPONSES TO ETHANOL USING IN VIVO AND IN VITRO MODELS OF FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDER

      Camargo, Maria (2016)
      Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is a serious public health concern affecting 3.6% of the US population. One avenue to achieve a decrease in the prevalence of FASD is for scientific research to identify cellular mechanisms of action of imbibed alcohol and propose solutions to treat or prevent the damage done. Here we present our investigation into the molecular consequences of ethanol exposure in mouse brain cells and mouse neural stem cell cultures. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that p53 mediates the neurogenomic response to ethanol exposure in brain cells in the somatosensory cortex, hippocampus and neural stem cells. p53 is a versatile transcription factor well known for inducing cell death in cancer cells. We identified the apoptosis pathway as being changed in a p53-related manner only in the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus, based on expression changes in Casp2, Cdk1, and Stat1. Overall, the regions interrogated revealed that p53’s cellular response is heterogeneous. In the somatosensory cortex and hippocampus a subset of gene expression changes occurred depending on both ethanol exposure and the presence of p53: Ephb1in layer 2/3; Ctgf in layer 5; Camk1 in layer 6; Cdk1, Casp2, Cdk1, and Stat1 in the CA1; and Camk1 in the DG. In regards to the specific mRNAs that changed, they differed in the brain regions and cell cultures, but we did observe that neuronal and developmental genes were the most significantly changed upon ethanol exposure. In addition, we also identified that the category of genes whose methylation pattern was changed after ethanol exposure are related to basic neuronal functions. Neural cells also appeared to be engaged in a challenging response to ethanol because DNA repair proteins Ercc1, Hus1, and Rad51 alter their DNA binding after ethanol exposure. In addition, we identified that p53 transcription factor changes its DNA binding in response to ethanol exposure. In conclusion, we identified that neural p53 signaling is measurably perturbed by ethanol exposure.
    • The Chemosensory-­Related Consequences of Fetal Ethanol or Fetal Nicotine Exposure: Their Contribution to Postnatal Nicotine Acceptance

      Youngentob, Steven; MANTELLA, NICOLE (2015)
      Human studies demonstrate a predictive association between gestational exposure to alcohol or nicotine and the probabilityoflater nicotine dependence.The flavor qualitiesof both drugsare known to influencetheir earlyacceptance and they share the perceptual attributesof an aversive odor, bitter taste and oral irritation.This dissertationexamined whether there are chemosensory-­‐related consequences offetal: (1) alcohol exposurethat contribute toenhanced nicotine acceptance; or (2)nicotine exposure that also enhances acceptance. The study rationale was drivenby overlappingliteraturesrelated to: (1) the relationship between gestational exposurewith chemosensory stimuli and their postnatal acceptance; (2) lessons learned from prenatal alcohol exposure and its postnatal consequences; and (3) perceptual commonalities between the flavor of alcohol and nicotine.Alcohol studies: rats were alcohol-­‐exposed during gestationvia the dams’ liquid diet. Control damsreceived ad libaccessto an iso-­‐caloric, iso-­‐nutritive diet. Nicotine studies: dams’ were implanted with a mini-­‐osmotic pump containing nicotine.Control animals received either vehicle only or no pump. Behaviorally, we found that fetal alcohol exposed adolescent rats showed anenhanced nicotine odor
    • Targetingof PIM1 KinaseinMyeloproliferative NeoplasmsInduced by JAK2V617F

      Mohi, Golam; Stuver, Matthew (2017)
      Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) arestem cell-derivedblood disorders. The most common mutation found in MPN patients is the JAK2V617Fmutation. JAK2 is anon-receptor tyrosine kinase involved in STAT signaling. The JAK2V617F mutation is asingle amino acid substitution of a phenylalanine for valine, whichcauses JAK2 to be constitutively activated. This mutation can cause ahematopoietic transformation. Eventuallythis transformationcan lead to the development of one of thethree different Philadelphia-negative MPN diseases: Polycythemia Vera (PV), Essential Thrombocythemia (ET), and Primary Myelofibrosis (PMF). The JAK2V617F mutationhas been identified in 95% PVpatients,and 50-60% ofETand PMF patients.A JAK1/2 inhibitor (ruxolitinib) has been approved for MF and PV patients and,though it provides initial benefits, it is not effective enough to causelong-termremission in patients. This creates a critical need to identify new therapeutic targets for MPN patients. We found that PIM1 levels were significantly increased inMPN patients, as well asour JAK2V617F mouse modelof MPN.We observedthatknockdown of PIM1 caused a significant decrease in proliferationof JAK2V617F expressing cells. We also found that PIM1 knockdownhad no effect on the proliferation of hematopoietic cells not expressing JAK2V617F, leading us to believe PIM1 is only required in JAK2V617F mediated proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition of PIM kinases,using TP-3654,(kindly provided by Tolero pharmaceuticals)also led to a significant decrease in proliferation of JAK2V617F-expressing cells, but had no effect on cellslacking the mutation. We also found thatthePIM inhibitor,TP-3654,workssynergistically with ruxolitinibto achieve an even greater decrease in proliferation. We found that using the combination of ruxolitiniband TP-3654,we could use both drugs at lower concentrations andachieve an even greater decrease in proliferation and an increase apoptosis. Furthermore,we found that inhibition of PIM kinasesusing TP-3654can resensitize ruxolitinib-resistant cells to ruxolitinibtreatment.These important findingsshow that PIM1 plays animportantrolein the proliferation of hematopoietic cells expressing the JAK2V617F mutation, but is dispensable for the maintenance of cells lacking the mutation. We also found that targeting PIM kinases with TP-3654,significantly decreasedthe proliferation, and increaseapoptosisactivationof JAK2V617Fexpressing cells. We also showedthat TP-3654 and ruxolitinibcan work synergistically. Lastly, we showed that inhibition of PIM kinases,using TP-3654,caused ruxolitinib-resistant cells tobecome resensitized toruxolitinib. These findings helpedus come to the conclusionthatPIM1 kinase, is an importanttherapeutictargetin JAK2V617F-induced MPNs.
    • Domain swapping, fragment complementation, and self-assembly in engineered chimeric proteins.

      Loh, Stewart; Craft, Matthew (2014)
      Domain swapping is a form of protein oligomerization in which two or more identical proteins reciprocally exchange parts of their tertiary structure. The structure of the domain swapped proteins is identical to the structure formed by the monomer except for the hinge region linking the two domains. Domain swapping provides the cell with a way to control complex assembly, alter enzyme kinetics and specificity. Domain swapping can also be used to reconstitute enzyme function or as a form of molecular recognition. Only a small number of proteins are known domain swap, and the forces behind domain swapping are not well understood. Much more need to be understood abouthow and why proteins domain swap, before it would be possible to reliably engineer proteins to do so. In an effort to understand the thermodynamic forces that drive domain swapping, the goal of this project was to induce domain swapping and investigate the effects different hinge regions have on an otherwise identical domain swapped structure. To accomplish this we inserted ubiquitin (Ub) into five surface loops of ribose binding protein (RBP), a protein that does not naturally domain swap. The presenceof ubiquitin puts conformational strain on RBP and vice versa, where the folding of one causes the other to unfold. The entropic penalty for having unfolded domains can be relieved by domain swapping, allowing all protein domains to be folded. Using gelfiltration and circular dichroism we determined that our RBP-Ub (RU) fusion proteins domain swap. This domain swapping is dependent upon the conformational strain caused by a folded Ub, and can be reversed by the addition of a flexible glycine linker. Using our RU system we provide the first evidence that proteins with non-identical hinge regions can domain swap to form stable, functional oligomers. Finally we present a physical model that explains the ability of different RU’s to domain swap, which provides at least some of the criteria required of domain swapping proteins.
    • The Formin FMNL1 Contributes to the Macrophage Inflammatory Response by Regulating Podosome-dependent Adhesion and Migration.

      Blystone, Scott; Miller, Matthew (2015)
      Macrophages are indispensible white blood cells (leukocytes) that contribute to both the innate and adaptive immune response. They are crucial for resolving inflammatory events by clearing pathogens and cellular debris, in addition to promoting wound repair. Macrophages are derived from peripherally circulating monocytes, which after stimulation undergo diapedesis from the vasculature into the underlying complex extracellular matrix, where they can become fully differentiated macrophages and migrate to inflammatory loci. Tissues also contain residential populations of macrophages that aid in immediate immune responses and maintain tissue homeostasis. Conversely, unwarranted macrophage activation largely contributes to the onset and progression of inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, in addition to aiding cancer metastasis and facilitating organ transplant rejection. In order for macrophages to effectively resolve inflammatory events or contribute to disease pathology, they must be able to undergo directional migration, which is mediated by integrin-dependent adhesion complexes termed podosomes. Macrophage podosomes are the most prominent structure of the macrophage actin cytoskeleton, containing a pillar-like core of dense filamentous actin that is tethered to the cortical actincytoskeleton via radial actin filaments. Podosomes also contain a variety of proteins that are circumferentially arranged orassociated with the core, and thatare involved in signaling, linking, and scaffolding,as well as modulating the actin cytoskeleton.Historically, our lab has been interested in leukocyte integrin biology and understanding how these receptors mediate adhesion and migration through complex extracellular matrices. Previous studies in our lab demonstrated the novel podosomal association of an actin modulating protein with the ability to processively elongate unbranched linear actin filaments. Subsequent studies determined this protein to be the formin FMNL1, which is predominantly expressed in hematopoietic cells. Consequently, we further revealed that FMNL1 localizes to the apex of the dense actin core, and is required for podosome stability and macrophage adhesion.The work described in this dissertation has greatly expanded on these findings, demonstrating for the first time that primary macrophage migration is dependent on the formin FMNL1. Utilizing in vitro and in vivotechniques with aid of a novel conditional murine FMNL1 KO, we have observed that macrophage podosome formation, migration, and tissue distribution are dependent on FMNL1. Additionally, we have indicated that FMNL1 is required for embryonic development. Remarkably, our findings also suggest that FMNL1-dependent macrophage migration and podosome localization rely on the specific isoform FMNL1γ. Foremost, we have demonstrated that barbed end binding by the FMNL1γ FH2 domain is dispensable for its cellularfunction in macrophages, which has not been previously shown for any other cellular formin function. Thus, these findings, in addition to current formin knowledge, have allowed us develop a working model for FMNL1 function at macrophage podosomes. This work has distinguished FMNL1 as a unique therapeutic target to restrict macrophage migration that contributes to macrophage-mediated diseases. Furthermore, this could translate to treatment of certain cancers, since FMNL1 has been suggested to promote leukemic cell migration.
    • Reconstitution and Characterization of RNA Polymerase I Upstream Activating Factor.

      Knutson, Bruce; Smith, Marissa (2018)
      RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is the first and one of the most critical steps in ribosome biosynthesis. Pol I transcription initiation is coordinated by four Pol I factors that include the Upstream Activating Factor (UAF), TATA-binding protein (TBP), Core Factor (CF), and Rrn3. These factors work together to recruit Pol I to the rDNApromoter and to initiate transcription.UAF is a six-subunit complex composed of Rrn9, Rrn5, Uaf30, Rrn10, and histones H3 and H4.To investigate the importance of each UAF subunit in UAF complex formation and complex integrity, we developed a recombinant Escherichia coli-based system to coexpress and purify transcriptionally active UAF complex. Here, we found that no single subunit is required for UAF assembly, including histones H3 and H4. We also demonstrate that histone H3 is able to interact with each UAF-specific subunit. Last, wedetermined the stoichiometry of the subunits of the UAF complex, revealing there are two copies of histoneH3 and one copy of the remaining UAF subunits, including histone H4. Together, our results provide a new model suggesting that UAF contains a hybrid H3–H4 tetramer-like subcomplex.The results from this thesiswill help to reveal key mechanisms in Pol Itranscription activation.
    • Characterizing the Role of the Epsilon Subunit in Regulation of the Escherichia coli ATP Synthase.

      Duncan, Thomas; Shah, Naman (2015)
      The F-type ATP synthase is a rotary nanomotor central to cellular energy metabolism in almost all living organisms. In bacteria, the enzyme also plays a role in nutrient uptake and pH regulation underlining its importance. All ATP synthases can be inhibited by ADP, whereas in bacteria, the enzyme is alsoautoinhibitedbyits ε subunit. The inhibition involves a drastic conformationa l change of the C-terminal domain of the ε subunit (εCTD)thatblockscatalytic turnover. Thisregulation by ε is believed to play an important role in maintaining viability of the cell. Recent development in the field of antibiotics has validated ATP synthase as a drug target against pathogenic bacteria. Thus, there is a renewed interest in studying the role of the ε subunit in regulation of the enzyme and exploiting it to develop antimicrobials that can kill pathogenic bacteria. The present work describes advances in our understanding of the regulatory interactions of εCTD in E. coli ATP synthase.In the first approach, we used an optical binding assay to understand the transitions of εCTD between its active and inhibitory conformations.Using different ligands we revealedthe relationship between ADP inhibition and ε inhibition. In the second novel approach, the terminal five amino acids of εCTD were deleted to observe the effects on in vivo and in vitro functions of ATP synthase. The results obtained from these studies advance our understanding of εinhibition inbacteria and also provide a noveltarget within bacterial ATP synthase to obtain antibacterial drugs.
    • SHP-1-dependent macrophage responses mediate virus-induced myositis and demyelinating disease.

      Massa, Paul; Watson, Neva (2015)
      Regulation of inflammatory immune responses to pathogenic microbial infections is critical for protecting against extensive tissue damage and chronic inflammation. Correspondingly, genes associated with inflammatory immune responses have been identified as potential genetic risk factors for chronic inflammatory diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS) and idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs). This dissertation will focus on characterizing how the key immune regulator, Src-homology 2 containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1), controls virus-induced inflammatory diseases in the central nervous system (CNS) and skeletal muscle. We previously reported that SHP-1 inhibits proinflammatory macrophage-mediated CNS demyelinating disease during Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis (TMEV) infection in mice. Presently, we describe that SHP-1 controls TMEV-induced dystrophic calcification of skeletal muscle. Muscle-infiltrating macrophages displayed a proinflammatory M1-like phenotype and promoted muscle calcification in WT mice, whereas an increased infiltration of macrophages with a reduced M1 signature corresponded with absence of muscle disease in SHP-1-/-mice. These studies reveal SHP-1 as a key regulatory gene mediating CNS and skeletal muscle disease in response to a virus trigger.Proinflammatory macrophages promoted tissue damage in either skeletal muscle of WT mice or CNS of SHP-1-deficient mice following TMEV infection. We thus attempted to determine if SHP-1 activity within macrophages was sufficient to control the outcome of TMEV infection using multiple genetic approaches. However, since these cells have a high turnover rate, and SHP-1 was strongly induced in macrophages by TMEV infection, these approaches were not sufficient to address whether SHP-1 activity specifically within macrophages mediates tissue-specific disease outcomes following TMEV infection. The studies described here suggest that SHP-1 affects macrophage maturation in peripheral (muscle) and immune-privileged (CNS) tissues in opposite ways. However, SHP-1 inhibited inflammatory monocyte CCR2 expression and subsequent infiltration into both of these major sites of infection, indicating that additional environmental cues mediated by SHP-1 are needed to drive tissue-specific maturation of pathogenic M1-like macrophages in either the CNS or muscle, to explain tissue-specific disease outcomes in SHP-1-deficient mice. Thus, this dissertation characterized unique mechanisms by which SHP-1 mediates inflammatory responses to virus infections, and has revealed SHP-1 and proinflammatory M1-like macrophages as essential mediators of myositis and demyelinating CNS disease.
    • REELIN SIGNALING COORDINATES DENDRITICINITIATION AND CELLULAR POSITIONING BY NEURITESTABILIZATION

      Olson, Eric; O’Dell, Ryan (2015)
      The laminar organization characteristic of the adult mammalian neocortex is a product of the precise coordination of neuronal proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Among these processes, the biological signals controlling apical dendrite initiation and targeting are not completely understood.The secreted ligand Reelin is a largeextracellular matrix glycoprotein localized to the axonal plexus of themarginal zone, and mutations areassociated with severe disruptions in cellular organization in laminated brain regions. Although the Reelin signaling pathway has been traditionally describedas a modulator of neuronal migration, recent evidence suggests Reelin controlsneuronal orientation and subsequent dendritogenesis into the overlying marginal zoneduring a period of early cortical development known as preplate splitting.To explicitly characterize how Reelin coordinates the transition between migration and dendritogenesis and controls polarized apical dendrite initiation and growth, an ex uteroexplant model of early cortical developmentwas used for fixed tissue and multiphoton live imaging analysis. Our investigations revealed the apical dendrite of cortical neurons emerges via direct transformation of the leading process during terminal translocation.Both throughoutand after this migratory phase, the dendriticarbor demonstrated significant increases in growth and branching, typically initiatedafter leading process entryinto the Reelin-rich marginal zone.In the absence of Reelin signaling, mutant cortices demonstrated a significant proportion of neurons that successfully translocated, but showed unstable arbors and marginal zone avoidance after migration arrest. Application of exogenous Reelin protein rescued dendritekinetics and polarity within4 hours, resultinginthe retraction of tangentially orienteddendritessimultaneous with the extension of a highly branched,apicallyoriented primary process. These findings suggesta precise role of Reelin signaling in early cortical development in proper neuronal polarization and stabledendrite outgrowth into the marginal zone, an area otherwiseexclusionary for dendrites. Furthermore, it is suggested that appropriate dendritic arbor elaborationinto the marginal zone may not only promote terminal translocation, but also definesthe final position of migration arrest.Thisbody of work thus offers an important advancement in understanding Reelin’s role in polarized dendritic outgrowth and the subsequent knock-on effectsassociated withperturbationsof this signaling pathway.
    • Transcriptome-wide gene expression in a rat model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms: Rats developmentally exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls

      Sazonova, Nadezhda A.; DasBanerjee, Tania; Middleton, Frank A.; Gowtham, Sriharsha; Schuckers, Stephanie; Faraone, Stephen V. (Wiley, 2011-09-14)
      Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) exposure in rodents provides a useful model for the symptoms of Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The goal of this study is to identify genes whose expression levels are altered in response to PCB exposure. The brains from 48 rats separated into two age groups of 24 animals each (4 males and 4 females for each PCB exposure level (control, PCB utero, and PCB lactational)) were harvested at postnatal days 23 and 35, respectively. The RNA was isolated from three brain regions of interest and was analyzed for differences in expression of a set of 27,342 transcripts. Two hundred seventy-nine transcripts showed significant differential expression due to PCB exposure mostly due to the difference between PCB lactational and control groups. The cluster analysis applied to these transcripts revealed that significant changes in gene expression levels in PFC area due to PCB lactational exposure. Our pathway analyses implicated 27 significant canonical pathways and 38 significant functional pathways. Our transcriptomewide analysis of the effects of PCB exposure shows that the expression of many genes is dysregulated by lactational PCB exposure, but not gestational exposure and has highlighted biological pathways that might mediate the effects of PCB exposure on ADHD-like behaviors seen in exposed animals. Our work should further motivate studies of fatty acids in ADHD, and further suggests that another potentially druggable pathway, oxidative stress,may play a role in PCB inducedADHD behaviors
    • The monoamine oxidase B gene exhibits significant association to ADHD

      Li, Jun; Wang, Yufeng; Hu, Songnian; Zhou, Rulun; Yu, Xiaomin; Wang, Bing; Guan, Lili; Yang, Li; Zhang, Feng; Faraone, Stephen V. (Wiley, 2008)
      Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neuropsychiatric condition with strong genetic basis. Recent work in China indicated that ADHD may be linked to Xp1–2 in the Han Chinese population. The gene encoding monoamine oxidase B (MAOB), the main enzyme degrading dopamine in the human brain, is located in this region. The current study sequenced the exons and the 50 and 30 flanking regions of theMAOBgene and found four common variants including 2276C>T and 2327C>T in exon 15, rs1799836 in intron 13 and rs1040399 in 30-UTR. We assessed the association of these variants with ADHD in 548 trios collected from 468 males and 80 females probands. TDT analysis showed that alleles of each polymorphism were preferentially transmitted to probands (rs1799836, P¼3.28E-15; rs1040399, P¼1.87E-6; 2276T>C or 2327T>C, P¼2.20E-6) and haplotype-based TDT analyses also found distorted transmission. In conclusion, this study provides the strongest evidence for the involvement of MAOB gene in the etiology of ADHD to date, at least in Han Chinese population.
    • The multidimensionality of schizotypy in nonpsychotic relatives of patients with schizophrenia and its applications in ordered subsets linkage analysis of schizophrenia

      Lien, Yin-Ju; Tsuang, Hui-Chun; Chiang, Abigail; Liu, Chih-Min; Hsieh, Ming H.; Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; Liu, Shi K.; Hsiao, Po-Chang; Faraone, Stephen V.; Tsuang, Ming T.; et al. (Wiley, 2009)
      This study aimed to examine the multidimensionality of schizotypy and validate the structure using ordered subset linkage analyses on information from both relatives’ schizotypy and probands’ schizophrenia symptoms. A total of 203 and 1,310 nonpsychotic first-degree relatives from simplex and multiplex schizophrenia families, respectively, were interviewed with the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies, which contains a modified Structured Interview for Schizotypy. Using Mplus program with categorical factor indicators, a four-factor model (Negative Schizotypy, Positive Schizotypy, Interpersonal Sensitivity, and Social Isolation/Introversion) was extracted by exploratory factor analysis from relatives of simplex families and was confirmed in relatives of multiplex families. The validity of each factor was supported by distinct linkage findings resulting from ordered subset analysis based on different combinations of schizophrenia–schizotypy factors. Six chromosomal regions with significant increase in nonparametric linkage z score (NPL-Z) were found as follows: 15q21.1 (NPLZ ¼3.60) for Negative Schizophrenia–Negative Schizotypy, 10q22.3 (NPL-Z¼3.83) and 15q21.3 (NPL-Z¼3.36) for Negative Schizophrenia–Social Isolation/Introversion, 5q14.2 (NPL-Z¼3.20) and 11q23.3 (NPL-Z¼3.31) for Positive Schizophrenia–Positive Schizotypy, and 4q32.1 (NPL-Z¼3.31- ) for Positive Schizophrenia–Interpersonal Sensitivity. The greatest NPL-Z of 3.83 on 10q22.3 in the subset was significantly higher than the greatest one of 2.88 in the whole sample (empirical P-value¼0.04). We concluded that a consistent four-factor model of schizotypy could be derived in nonpsychotic relatives across families of patients with different genetic loadings in schizophrenia. Their differential relations to linkage signals have etiological implications and provide further evidence for their validity. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.