• Genome-wide search for schizophrenia susceptibility loci: The NIMH genetics initiative and millennium consortium

      Cloninger, C. Robert; Kaufmann, Charles A.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Malaspina, Dolores; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill; Suarez, Brian K.; Matise, Tara C.; Shore, David; Lee, Hang; et al. (Wiley, 1998-07-10)
      chizophrenia has a complex pattern of inheritance, indicative of interactions among multiple genes and environmental factors. The detection and replication of specific susceptibility loci for such complex disorders are facilitated by the availability of large samples of affected sib pairs and their nuclear families, along with standardized assessment and systematic ascertainment procedures. The NIMH Genetics Initiative on Schizophrenia, a multisite collaborative study, was established as a national resource with a centralized clinical data base and cell repository. The Millennium Schizophrenia Consortium has completed a genome-wide scan to detect susceptibility loci for schizophrenia in 244 individuals from the nuclear families of 92 independent pairs of schizophrenic sibs ascertained by the NIMH Genetics Initiative. The 459 marker loci used in the scan were spaced at 10-cM intervals on average. Individuals of African descent were higher than those of European descent in their average heterozygosity (79% vs. 76%, P < .0001) and number of alleles per marker (9.2 vs. 8.4, P < .0001). Also, the allele frequencies of 73% of the marker loci differed significantly (P < .01) between individuals of European and African ancestry. However, regardless of ethnic background, this sample was largely comprised of schizophrenics with more than a decade of psychosis associated with pervasive social and occupational impairment. Am. J. Med. Genet. (Neuropsychiatr. Genet.) 81:275–281, 1998. © 1998 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    • GENOME-WIDESTUDIES OF AUTISM IDENTIFY ALTERED IMMUNOLOGIC AND NEURODEVELOPMENTAL PATHWAYS AND HIGHLIGHT PUTATIVE DIAGNOSTIC BIOMARKER SIGNALS

      Glatt, Stephen; Tylee, Daniel (2017)
      Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental syndrome that can be challenging to identify in young children. Family-based and genetic studies indicate that autism has a strong genetic component, though immunologic processes may also contribute to altered neurodevelopment. Over the past two decades, genome-wide investigations have provided critical insights into the genetic causes and molecular correlates of autism at the levels of both the individual and the population. Studies of DNA have identified highly penetrant genetic factors that appear to explain a sizable minority (20-40%) of autism-affected individuals. However, patho-developmental mechanisms are less-clearly understood for the remaining majority of individuals for whom no highly penetrant factors are identifiable(i.e., idiopathic autism). The present body of work contains three studies that used genome-wide assessment methods to predict the diagnosis of autism and to characterize its molecular correlates using samples that predominantly reflect idiopathic etiology. In Chapter 1, we demonstrate that large numbers of low-penetrance genetic factors(i.e., commonly varying single nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs) can be harnessed with machine-learning methods to predict autism risk. Throughout this document, we provide a review and critical evaluation of DNA-and RNA-based autism biomarkers. In Chapters 2 and 3, we use microarray and RNA sequencing to identify consistent patterns of autism-related gene expression in peripheral blood samples. These patterns shed light on altered immunologic signaling and also implicate signaling pathways that are known to be involved in neurodevelopment and to influence autism-related clinical and neurobiological phenotypes. Importantly, our findings indicate that the molecular correlates of idiopathic autism may converge with mechanisms understood from high-penetrance genetic causes. Furthermore, our findings support the idea that immunologic mechanisms could contribute to perturbations of neurodevelopmental pathways. We integrate our findings in the context of existing literature, highlight current gaps in knowledge, and propose future experiments to address these questions.
    • The Global Module Project: Developing and Troubleshooting Online Discussion Session between Empire State College Students Based in Panama and SUNYIT Students from New York State

      Rodick, Alena (2013-05-01)
      The purpose of this project was to set up an online cross-cultural collaboration module between students located around New York State and another group in Panama City, Panama. Using cognitive psychology approaches to learning, the author of the thesis designed an effective online space and module structure for two groups of students to introduce each other, participate in the discussions, and provide critical reflection about participation in the module. AWordPress site was created wherein students provided responses to a set of videos. The students all met at an Elluminate session and later reflected on the experience in an Angel discussion group. The author of the thesis journaled how she designed the online learning space and documented the effects of the use of the online group discussions and online meeting space on the group interaction. She also had students in both groups evaluate the tools used in the experiment.
    • Google Glass In the Classroom

      Nicosia, Sylvia Navarro (2015-05-01)
      This project is a prototype application for Google Glass that would help horticultural students with the difficult task of plant identification. The main purpose is to determine if a wearable device, embedded with augmented reality, can enhance both teaching and learning, using Cognitive Theory principles, by improving engagement and motivation. The prototype was built using JustInMind, a prototyping application, which allows prototypes to run in Google Glass. Three students and two faculty members from the Horticultural Department tested the application; all concurred that this application had potential, as long as the underlying database was comprehensive.
    • A Guide to Mobile Apps for Small Cultural Heritage Non-Profits: Leveraging Mobile Technologies to Guide and Engage Visitors

      Parker, Danielle; Schneider, Steven; Advisor; Kahn, Russell; Second Reader (2017-12)
      Constrained by limited staffing and tight budgets, small, cultural heritage non-profits may struggle to promote visitation and engage visitors who do make on-site visits. This paper identifies the opportunities mobile technologies can provide to bridge the gap between cultural heritage organizations and their visitors. Current research on the use of digital media and mobile technology in the museum field, as well as research on museum visitor motivations and learning, are explored. Based on study findings and expert recommendations, key design factors for a mobile app to be used at all stages of a visit are determined. The design themes of wayfinding, personalization, multimedia, and relationship-building are explored. Small historic non-profits can benefit by leveraging these mobile design features to enrich the visitor experience. This thesis project consists of the design and development of Web-based guide (Web site) including a case study and an example Request for Proposal (RFP) to educate historic non-profit administrators on the opportunities for implementing these features at their organizations.
    • HAIR LOVE: SHOWCASING THE DIVERSITY OF NATURAL HAIR THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY AND PERSONAL NARRATIVES

      Stam, Kathryn; Thesis Advisor; Lizardi, Ryan; Second Reader; Niles, JoAnna (2021-05)
      Throughout the years, Natural Hair has been used as a form of expression, self-acceptance, and controversy in the United States of America. The invention of Web 2.0, the rise of social media, blogs, and other web-based platforms has given members of the Natural Hair community a platform to share their personal stories and tips related to natural hair care with others. This project looked at the effects of Web 2.0 during the second wave of the Natural Hair Movement since the year 2008, showcasing various hairstyles through digital photography and personal narratives of five individuals. Previous studies have shown that men and women with naturally curly hair have faced some form of discrimination based on their hairstyle, causing them to assimilate to societal norms of wearing their hair straight. The goal for this project was to showcase the versatility of natural hair through digital photography and personal narratives as a form of storytelling, and sharing how social media and other outlets across the web have impacted the individual’s decision to wear their hair in its natural state or how it has helped them in their natural hair journey. Photos of five different people of various cultural backgrounds, hair textures, and lifestyles were taken and questions based on their Natural Hair journey were asked. With the collection of photographs and narratives, a Capstone portfolio section of my media website was created for public viewing. This platform can be updated as photos of more individuals with natural hair at local events and expos in the future are taken.
    • Heterogeneity and the genetics of bipolar disorder

      Faraone, Stephen V.; Tsuang, Ming T. (Wiley, 2003-10-30)
    • High Performance Distributed Big File Cloud Storage

      Shakelli, Anusha; Sengupta, Sam; Adviser; White, Joshua; Reviewer (2016-05-01)
      Cloud storage services are growing at a fast rate and are emerging in data storage field. These services are used by people for backing up data, sharing file through social networks like Facebook [3], Zing Me [2]. Users will be able to upload data from computer, mobile or tablet and also download and share them to others. Thus, system load in cloud storage becomes huge. Nowadays, Cloud storage service has become a crucial requirement for many enterprises due to its features like cost saving, performance, security, flexibility. To design an efficient storage engine for cloud based systems, it is always required to deal with requirements like big file processing, lightweight metadata, deduplication, high scalability. Here we suggest a Big file cloud architecture to handle all problems in big file cloud system. Basically, here we propose to build a scalable distributed data cloud storage that supports big file with size up to several terabytes. In cloud storage, system load is usually heavy. Data deduplication to reduce wastage of storage space caused by storing same static data from different users. In order to solve the above problems, a common method used in Cloud storages, is by dividing big file into small blocks, storing them on disks and then dealing them using a metadata system [1], [6], [19], [20]. Current cloud storage services have a complex metadata system. Thereby, the space complexity of the metadata System is O(n) and it is not scalable for big file. In this research, a new big file cloud storage architecture and a better solution to reduce the space complexity of metadata is suggested.
    • How Can a University Approach the Construction of a Blog Space For Use as a Recruiting Tool?

      Washburn, Teresa M.R. (2006-08-01)
      This case study examines the social construction of a blog space to recruit prospective students. The blog space initially created by SUNYIT is examined and compared with other existing blog spaces at accredited universities in New York State. The research in this case study is based on web site observations, interviews, questionnaires, review of literature and an information session. The theory of sensemaking and organizational culture (participatory culture, specifically) are applied to help understand the case and context.
    • How Colleges Have Responded to Changes In Student Recruitment as Defined By Their Level of Web Definition on Their Official College Web Sites

      Ayouch, Karen (2007-08-01)
      Increased competition amongst colleges, advances in technology and the changing wants and needs of the target market has influenced colleges to expand their marketing techniques globally through the use of the World Wide Web. One hundred randomly selected college websites were analyzed for specific criteria found on the main page or any page that can be accessed from the main page. Demographic information was also collected about the colleges to look for potential trends in the level of web definition. The level was web definition was defined by specified criteria in the areas of technology implementation, interactivity and marketing concepts. The findings show that the area of marketing had the greatest number of colleges assigned to the medium-high level of web definition for both potential and actual number of points assigned and the area interactivity had the greatest number of colleges assigned to the low-medium level of web definition.
    • How Decisions Are Made When Creating Information Design Exhibits for Museums

      Yahnke, David R. (2008-12-01)
      This case study illustrates how and when decisions are made during the creative process occurring within two cultures: Graphic Designers and Museum Exhibitors. This study investigates the pre-visual creative process and fabrication of exhibits concerning the history of farming in Oneida County and the history of New York State during the American Revolutionary War at the Marcus Willet Visitors Center at Fort Stanwix in Rome, NY. This study will apply wayfinding theories to information design practice; the result is a field guide for both graphic and museum designers. This case study explains the nature of decision-making used in creation of information design. The particular project to be studied is the design of a permanent exhibit for a community historical society. Each decision to be made is documented; details are provided regarding what decisions are made, who makes the decisions, when decisions are made, and the many factors that impact the decision-making process. The case study is a description of this particular design process and a guide to the way in which decisions are made in information design. The major decisions concern the audience, content, means of wayfinding, design consistency, color, typographic parameters, size, and viewing distances. This study explores the impact these decisions had on the final exhibition design.
    • How is GIS used in a Community College Setting for Architectural Identification

      Judycki, Brian (2005-05-01)
      This case study analyzes how students use an Architectural Identification GIS Application in a community college setting.
    • The Hybrid Course Experience

      Thompson, Jonathan M (2005-05-01)
      This phenomenology analyzes the experience of students and teachers in hybrid (blended) courses in a community college and a university located in central New York.The Constructivist Learning Theory is applied to the hybrid course characteristics and analyzed to determine the effectiveness of hybrid courses. A definition and description of hybrid courses is proposed.
    • Hypertextual Teaching in a TiddlySpace Educational Environment

      Shaw, Jason (2013-05-01)
      This thesis project uses first-hand observation and academic inquiry to inform the design and implementation of a hypertext-capable alternative online learning system in an open source wiki, called TiddlySpace. This system is then used as the educational environment in which students, with minimal hypertextual experience, are taught to think hypertextually and record their work in a collaborative hypertext environment. The researcher finds TiddlySpace to be dynamic enough to handle mid-semester changes and also powerful enough to support a wide range of academic assignments. The bulk of these assignments required students to create a large amount of structured microcontent, which appeared to encourage hypertext literacy. Finally, the researcher examines the idea that increased hypertextual literacy may encourage conceptual learning in a greater sense.
    • IDENTIFICATION OF p53-MEDIATED NEUROGENOMIC RESPONSES TO ETHANOL USING IN VIVO AND IN VITRO MODELS OF FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDER

      Camargo, Maria (2016)
      Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is a serious public health concern affecting 3.6% of the US population. One avenue to achieve a decrease in the prevalence of FASD is for scientific research to identify cellular mechanisms of action of imbibed alcohol and propose solutions to treat or prevent the damage done. Here we present our investigation into the molecular consequences of ethanol exposure in mouse brain cells and mouse neural stem cell cultures. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that p53 mediates the neurogenomic response to ethanol exposure in brain cells in the somatosensory cortex, hippocampus and neural stem cells. p53 is a versatile transcription factor well known for inducing cell death in cancer cells. We identified the apoptosis pathway as being changed in a p53-related manner only in the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus, based on expression changes in Casp2, Cdk1, and Stat1. Overall, the regions interrogated revealed that p53’s cellular response is heterogeneous. In the somatosensory cortex and hippocampus a subset of gene expression changes occurred depending on both ethanol exposure and the presence of p53: Ephb1in layer 2/3; Ctgf in layer 5; Camk1 in layer 6; Cdk1, Casp2, Cdk1, and Stat1 in the CA1; and Camk1 in the DG. In regards to the specific mRNAs that changed, they differed in the brain regions and cell cultures, but we did observe that neuronal and developmental genes were the most significantly changed upon ethanol exposure. In addition, we also identified that the category of genes whose methylation pattern was changed after ethanol exposure are related to basic neuronal functions. Neural cells also appeared to be engaged in a challenging response to ethanol because DNA repair proteins Ercc1, Hus1, and Rad51 alter their DNA binding after ethanol exposure. In addition, we identified that p53 transcription factor changes its DNA binding in response to ethanol exposure. In conclusion, we identified that neural p53 signaling is measurably perturbed by ethanol exposure.
    • Identification of TIMP2 as the first secretory co-chaperone of eHSP90

      Dimitra Bourboulia; Baker-Williams, Alexander J. (2021)
      Heat Shock Protein- 90 (HSP90) is an essential molecular chaperone. HSP90 relies on its intrinsic ATPase activity as well as interactions with co-chaperone proteins to chaperone its clients. HSP90 is also an extracellular protein, performing both a signaling and chaperoning role. Extracellular client, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) relies on HSP90 for its stability. MMP2 mediates extracellular matrix remodeling through its gelatinolytic activity. MMP2 activity is also tightly regulated by its endogenous inhibitor, the Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP2). At present how HSP90 performs its chaperoning role in the extracellular matrix is uncertain. In this thesis, I describe that TIMP2 acts as the first bona fide extracellular co-chaperone of eHSP90, and show that TIMP2 is a stress inducible protein. I describe how TIMP2 directly interacts with HSP90, and how TIMP2 decelerates the HSP90 ATPase cycle. TIMP2 also sensitizes HSP90 to both ATP and N-terminal pharmaceuticals. Overall, TIMP2 acts as both a scaffold and a disruptor of the client/chaperone relationship between MMP2 and HSP90, performing both a HSP90 co-chaperone and MMP2 inhibitor role, non-mutually exclusively. The activatory co-chaperone AHA1 competes with TIMP2 for HSP90 binding. TIMP2 and AHA1 are able to form two independent ternary complexes with MMP2 and HSP90; as a result, the TIMP2 complex is MMP2 proteolytically inactive and the AHA1, active. This competition is further described in vivo where it can be inhibited by both _AHA1 antibodies and TIMP2 AHA1 antibodies and TIMP2 exogenous protein treatments, whilst induced following AHA1 protein and _AHA1 antibodies and TIMP2 TIMP2 antibody treatments. Finally, the role of phos-Y-TIMP2 was examined in relation to its interaction with HSP90. To address this, a novel methodology to purify hTIMP2 from E.Coli without previously necessary refolding strategies in a scale-able manner suitable for therapeutic TIMP2 treatments, was developed. Wild type recombinant human TIMP2 and phospho-mutants Y90E, Y90F, and TE (Y62E, Y90E, Y165E) were purified, were inhibitory towards MMP2, and modulated TIMP2 interaction with HSP90. Taken together, I demonstrate how extracellular HSP90 is regulated by co-chaperones to facilitate the chaperoning of pro-invasive client, MMP2. It further shows ways in which we can manipulate this system to promote an inactive MMP2 protease, a key strategy in cancer therapeutics.
    • Image Processing In F#

      Odoi, Kaia; Andriamanalimanana, Bruno; Advisor; Novillo, Jorge; Reviewer; Sengupta, Sam; Reviewer (2017-05-01)
      Image searching is an essential feature of many software applications. Histograms can be used to represent the pixel color intensities of images. Measuring the similarities between images by comparing the histograms can be performed through the use of information-theoretic measures, such as the Kullback-Leibler divergence and cross-entropy. In this project, a query image is selected from a collection of images and it is compared to the other images to determine which image is most similar to the query image. This process is carried out by creating histograms of each image, and then using measures such as the Kullback-Leibler divergence and cross-entropy to compare the histograms. The .NET functional language, F#, is used in the implementation of this project. The C# language, another .NET language, was also used for coding the graphical user interface.
    • Impact of Psychometrically Defined Deficits of Executive Functioning in Adults With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

      Biederman, Joseph; Petty, Carter; Fried, Ronna; Fontanella, Jessie; Doyle, Alysa E.; Seidman, Larry J.; Faraone, Stephen V. (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2006-10)
      Objective: The association between deficits in executive functioning and functional outcomes was examined among adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Subjects were adults who did (N=213) and did not (N=145) meet DSMIV criteria for ADHD. The authors defined having deficits in executive functioning as having at least two measures of executive functioning with scores 1.5 standard deviations below those of matched comparison subjects. Results: Significantly more adults with ADHD had deficits of executive functioning than comparison subjects. Deficits of executive functioning were associated with lower academic achievement, irrespective of ADHD status. Subjects with ADHD with deficits of executive functioning had a significantly lower socioeconomic status and a significant functional morbidity beyond the diagnosis of ADHD alone. Conclusions: Psychometrically defined deficits of executive functioning may help identify a subgroup of adults with ADHD at high risk for occupational and academic underachievement. More efforts are needed to identify cost-effective approaches to screen individuals with ADHD for deficits of executive functioning.
    • The Impact of Staff Development on Middle School Technology Integration

      Scalisi, Regina (2005-05-01)
      This case study describes the impact of technology staff development in two Central New York Middle Schools. The staff development program was implemented under the federally funded Enhancing Education Through Technology grant. Teachers and students were studied during a seven-month period as they learned to effectively use computers, Internet resources and available software with their curricula and instruction. The conditions of Change Theory were applied to the study as they relate to the adoption of technology integration.