• IDENTIFICATION OF p53-MEDIATED NEUROGENOMIC RESPONSES TO ETHANOL USING IN VIVO AND IN VITRO MODELS OF FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDER

      Camargo, Maria (2016)
      Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is a serious public health concern affecting 3.6% of the US population. One avenue to achieve a decrease in the prevalence of FASD is for scientific research to identify cellular mechanisms of action of imbibed alcohol and propose solutions to treat or prevent the damage done. Here we present our investigation into the molecular consequences of ethanol exposure in mouse brain cells and mouse neural stem cell cultures. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that p53 mediates the neurogenomic response to ethanol exposure in brain cells in the somatosensory cortex, hippocampus and neural stem cells. p53 is a versatile transcription factor well known for inducing cell death in cancer cells. We identified the apoptosis pathway as being changed in a p53-related manner only in the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus, based on expression changes in Casp2, Cdk1, and Stat1. Overall, the regions interrogated revealed that p53’s cellular response is heterogeneous. In the somatosensory cortex and hippocampus a subset of gene expression changes occurred depending on both ethanol exposure and the presence of p53: Ephb1in layer 2/3; Ctgf in layer 5; Camk1 in layer 6; Cdk1, Casp2, Cdk1, and Stat1 in the CA1; and Camk1 in the DG. In regards to the specific mRNAs that changed, they differed in the brain regions and cell cultures, but we did observe that neuronal and developmental genes were the most significantly changed upon ethanol exposure. In addition, we also identified that the category of genes whose methylation pattern was changed after ethanol exposure are related to basic neuronal functions. Neural cells also appeared to be engaged in a challenging response to ethanol because DNA repair proteins Ercc1, Hus1, and Rad51 alter their DNA binding after ethanol exposure. In addition, we identified that p53 transcription factor changes its DNA binding in response to ethanol exposure. In conclusion, we identified that neural p53 signaling is measurably perturbed by ethanol exposure.
    • Identification of TIMP2 as the first secretory co-chaperone of eHSP90

      Dimitra Bourboulia; Baker-Williams, Alexander J. (2021)
      Heat Shock Protein- 90 (HSP90) is an essential molecular chaperone. HSP90 relies on its intrinsic ATPase activity as well as interactions with co-chaperone proteins to chaperone its clients. HSP90 is also an extracellular protein, performing both a signaling and chaperoning role. Extracellular client, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) relies on HSP90 for its stability. MMP2 mediates extracellular matrix remodeling through its gelatinolytic activity. MMP2 activity is also tightly regulated by its endogenous inhibitor, the Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP2). At present how HSP90 performs its chaperoning role in the extracellular matrix is uncertain. In this thesis, I describe that TIMP2 acts as the first bona fide extracellular co-chaperone of eHSP90, and show that TIMP2 is a stress inducible protein. I describe how TIMP2 directly interacts with HSP90, and how TIMP2 decelerates the HSP90 ATPase cycle. TIMP2 also sensitizes HSP90 to both ATP and N-terminal pharmaceuticals. Overall, TIMP2 acts as both a scaffold and a disruptor of the client/chaperone relationship between MMP2 and HSP90, performing both a HSP90 co-chaperone and MMP2 inhibitor role, non-mutually exclusively. The activatory co-chaperone AHA1 competes with TIMP2 for HSP90 binding. TIMP2 and AHA1 are able to form two independent ternary complexes with MMP2 and HSP90; as a result, the TIMP2 complex is MMP2 proteolytically inactive and the AHA1, active. This competition is further described in vivo where it can be inhibited by both _AHA1 antibodies and TIMP2 AHA1 antibodies and TIMP2 exogenous protein treatments, whilst induced following AHA1 protein and _AHA1 antibodies and TIMP2 TIMP2 antibody treatments. Finally, the role of phos-Y-TIMP2 was examined in relation to its interaction with HSP90. To address this, a novel methodology to purify hTIMP2 from E.Coli without previously necessary refolding strategies in a scale-able manner suitable for therapeutic TIMP2 treatments, was developed. Wild type recombinant human TIMP2 and phospho-mutants Y90E, Y90F, and TE (Y62E, Y90E, Y165E) were purified, were inhibitory towards MMP2, and modulated TIMP2 interaction with HSP90. Taken together, I demonstrate how extracellular HSP90 is regulated by co-chaperones to facilitate the chaperoning of pro-invasive client, MMP2. It further shows ways in which we can manipulate this system to promote an inactive MMP2 protease, a key strategy in cancer therapeutics.
    • Image Processing In F#

      Odoi, Kaia; Andriamanalimanana, Bruno; Advisor; Novillo, Jorge; Reviewer; Sengupta, Sam; Reviewer (2017-05-01)
      Image searching is an essential feature of many software applications. Histograms can be used to represent the pixel color intensities of images. Measuring the similarities between images by comparing the histograms can be performed through the use of information-theoretic measures, such as the Kullback-Leibler divergence and cross-entropy. In this project, a query image is selected from a collection of images and it is compared to the other images to determine which image is most similar to the query image. This process is carried out by creating histograms of each image, and then using measures such as the Kullback-Leibler divergence and cross-entropy to compare the histograms. The .NET functional language, F#, is used in the implementation of this project. The C# language, another .NET language, was also used for coding the graphical user interface.
    • Impact of Psychometrically Defined Deficits of Executive Functioning in Adults With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

      Biederman, Joseph; Petty, Carter; Fried, Ronna; Fontanella, Jessie; Doyle, Alysa E.; Seidman, Larry J.; Faraone, Stephen V. (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2006-10)
      Objective: The association between deficits in executive functioning and functional outcomes was examined among adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Subjects were adults who did (N=213) and did not (N=145) meet DSMIV criteria for ADHD. The authors defined having deficits in executive functioning as having at least two measures of executive functioning with scores 1.5 standard deviations below those of matched comparison subjects. Results: Significantly more adults with ADHD had deficits of executive functioning than comparison subjects. Deficits of executive functioning were associated with lower academic achievement, irrespective of ADHD status. Subjects with ADHD with deficits of executive functioning had a significantly lower socioeconomic status and a significant functional morbidity beyond the diagnosis of ADHD alone. Conclusions: Psychometrically defined deficits of executive functioning may help identify a subgroup of adults with ADHD at high risk for occupational and academic underachievement. More efforts are needed to identify cost-effective approaches to screen individuals with ADHD for deficits of executive functioning.
    • The Impact of Staff Development on Middle School Technology Integration

      Scalisi, Regina (2005-05-01)
      This case study describes the impact of technology staff development in two Central New York Middle Schools. The staff development program was implemented under the federally funded Enhancing Education Through Technology grant. Teachers and students were studied during a seven-month period as they learned to effectively use computers, Internet resources and available software with their curricula and instruction. The conditions of Change Theory were applied to the study as they relate to the adoption of technology integration.
    • Impact of Tic Disorders on ADHD Outcome Across the Life Cycle: Findings From a Large Group of Adults With and Without ADHD

      Spencer, Thomas J.; Biederman, Joseph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Mick, Eric; Coffey, Barbara; Geller, Daniel; Kagan, Jake; Bearman, Sarah Kate; Wilens, Timothy (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2001-04)
      Objective: The impact of tic disorders on the outcome of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) remains a subject of high scientific and clinical interest. To evaluate the impact of comorbid ADHD and tic disorders from a lifespan perspective, the authors systematically examined data from adults with and without ADHD. Method: They comprehensively evaluated 312 consecutively referred adults with ADHD and 252 comparison subjects without ADHD. Tic disorders were characterized along with a wide range of neuropsychiatric correlates, including other comorbid disorders as well as indexes of function in the domains of school, cognition, and interpersonal functioning. Results: A significantly greater proportion of adults with ADHD (12%) than those without ADHD (4%) had tic disorders. Tic disorders followed a mostly remitting course and had little impact on functional capacities. In addition, tic disorders were not associated with stimulant use. Conclusions: These findings in adults with ADHD confirm and extend previous findings in young subjects with ADHD, documenting that although individuals with ADHD are at greater risk for tic disorders, the presence of tic disorders has a limited impact on ADHD outcome.
    • The Influence of College Web Sites on the College Selection Process

      Basi Raab, Maryrose (2005-12-01)
      This case study examines the use and influence of college web sites by high school seniors as they move through the college selection process through interviews, directed observations, and focus groups. It discovers and describes the different ways that web sites are used by this bounded group. As a part of the study, the re-designed web site at SUNY Institute of Technology is critiqued and analyzed by respondents. Enhancements are proposed based on the research to increase the effectiveness of the site in its appeal to prospective high school students. The theories of Human-Centered Design and Contextual Design are described and applied to this case study.
    • Influence of Gender on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children Referred to a Psychiatric Clinic

      Biederman, Joseph; Mick, Eric; Faraone, Stephen V.; Braaten, Ellen; Doyle, Alysa; Spencer, Thomas; Wilens, Timothy E.; Frazier, Elizabeth; Johnson, Mary Ann (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2002-01)
      Objective: The substantial discrepancy in the male-to-female ratio between clinic-referred (10 to 1) and community (3 to 1) samples of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) suggests that gender differences may be operant in the phenotypic expression of ADHD. In this study the authors systematically examined the impact of gender on the clinical features of ADHD in a group of children referred to a clinic. Method: The study included 140 boys and 140 girls with ADHD and 120 boys and 122 girls without ADHD as comparison subjects. All subjects were systematically assessed with structured diagnostic interviews and neuropsychological batteries for subtypes of ADHD as well as emotional, school, intellectual, interpersonal, and family functioning. Results: Girls with ADHD were more likely than boys to have the predominantly inattentive type of ADHD, less likely to have a learning disability, and less likely to manifest problems in school or in their spare time. In addition, girls with ADHD were at less risk for comorbid major depression, conduct disorder, and oppositional defiant disorder than boys with ADHD. A statistically significant gender-by-ADHD interaction was identified for comorbid substance use disorders as well. Conclusions: The lower likelihood for girls to manifest psychiatric, cognitive, and functional impairment than boys could result in gender-based referral bias unfavorable to girls with ADHD
    • The influence of genes on “positive valence systems” constructs: A systematic review

      Hess, Jonathan L.; Kawaguchi, Daniel M.; Wagner, Kayla E.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Glatt, Stephen J. (Wiley, 2015-09-14)
      The Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) address three types of aggression: frustrative non-reward, defensive aggression and offensive/proactive aggression. This review sought to present the evidence for genetic underpinnings of aggression and to determine to what degree prior studies have examined phenotypes that fit into the RDoC framework. Although the constructs of defensive and offensive aggression have been widely used in the animal genetics literature, the human literature is mostly agnostic with regard to all the RDoC constructs. We know from twin studies that about half the variance in behavior may be explained by genetic risk factors. This is true for both dimensional, trait-like, measures of aggression and categorical definitions of psychopathology. The non-shared environment seems to have a moderate influence with the effects of shared environment being unclear. Human molecular genetic studies of aggression are in an early stage. The most promising candidates are in the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems along with hormonal regulators. Genome-wide association studies have not yet achieved genome-wide significance, but current samples are too small to detect variants having the small effects one would expect for a complex disorder. The strongest molecular evidence for a genetic basis for aggression comes from animal models comparing aggressive and non-aggressive strains or documenting the effects of gene knockouts. Although we have learned much from these prior studies, future studies should improve the measurement of aggression by using a systematic method of measurement such as that proposed by the RDoC initiative. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    • Influence of Parental SUD and ADHD on ADHD in their Offspring: Preliminary Results from a Pilot-controlled Family Study

      Wilens, Timothy E.; Hahesy, Amy L.; Biederman, Joseph; Bredin, Elizabeth; Tanguay, Sarah; Kwon, Anne; Faraone, Stephen V. (Wiley, 2005-03)
      As part of a pilot-controlled family-based study of the children of parents with and without substance use disorders (SUD), the influence of parental SUD and ADHD on the risk for ADHD in offspring was evaluated. Using structured psychiatric interviews, 96 families (183 youth; mean age 11.6 years) were assessed. To evaluate the effect of parental ADHD and SUD, the offspring were stratified into four groups based on parental status: children of parents with neither ADHD nor SUD, children of parents with SUD only, children of parents with ADHD only, and children of parents with both ADHD and SUD. Using generalized estimating equation models, parental SUD and ADHD were used to predict ADHD in the offspring. The rate of children with ADHD increased among children of parents with neither disorder (3%), children of parents with SUD (13%), children of parents with ADHD (25%), and children of parents with both ADHD and SUD (50%) (p ¼ :001). Children of parents with ADHD or ADHD plus SUD were more likely to have ADHD in comparison to children of parents with neither diagnosis (p < 0:05). Children of parents with ADHD plus SUD were at greater risk of ADHD in comparison to children of parents with SUD only (p ¼ 0:01). Despite the small sample size, the results of this study seem to suggest that the offspring of SUD or ADHD parents are at elevated risk for ADHD compared to controls. The offspring of parents with both ADHD and SUD appear to be at the highest risk for ADHD, highlighting the need for careful screening of this group of youth for ADHD. Replication studies clarifying the nature and strength of the association are necessary.
    • The Influence of the DVD format on the College Selection Process

      Lanagan, Douglas F (2011-01-01)
      This case study centers on the role of the DVD format in regards to the decision making process about selecting a college. This study centers on the possible role that a DVD could play in that selection process, and what features an effective DVD might include in order to play a role in that decision. A Pilot DVD was produced for recruitment purposes in the Radio-Television Broadcasting program at a small upstate New York community college. Qualitative interviews were conducted with administrators, Admissions staff, prospective, current, and future students.Surveys were also conducted, both in person and online. The production process and distribution of the DVD is described, and the role of the DVD in the decision making process for selecting a college was examined. The evolution of Web 2.0 technologies was also taken into account. The research indicates that the DVD format was useful to students in their decision making process regarding enrolling in the program. It was also determined in this case study that the impact of the DVD alone, when considered against all other media used in college recruitment and decision making, was difficult to ascertain.
    • Infographics - Migrating from paper methods to electronic using an enterprise system - Jenzabar EX

      Stam, Kathryn; Thesis Advisor; Lizardi, Ryan; Second Reader; Psarudakis, Robert J. (2021-05)
      SUNY Sullivan has been facing challenges of declining enrollment since the start of the recession in 2008. For the most part the college seems to go through a roller-coaster ride of increasing but steadily declining enrollment spirals ever since. One of our key survival strategies is adaptation to change. Adaptations with programs, delivery methods in the way we offer programs and courses. We tend to be on the cutting edge of technology as it evolves and we adapt to new challenges as long as our funds from SUNY are available. In this paper I will identify some of the gaps in processes that are simply not working. I will look at the theories behind the changes and challenges that are associated with modern adaptations in addition to the reasons why we must change. In this respect I will be looking at our old processes such as paper forms and face to face contact. We are encountering a new world in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 causes all of our in-person activities to be remote. Currently, we are going through our Middle States self-study evaluation. "The Middle States Commission on Higher Education is a voluntary, non-governmental, institutional membership association currently serving higher education institutions in Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and any other geographic areas in which the Commission elects to conduct accrediting activities within the United States." (MSCHE, website). Looking at what we do as an institution, we found that we have many "gaps" that need to be filled in. Nothing has proven this more than COVID-19.
    • Information Design and Technology

      Ossowski, Candice (2004-05-01)
      This case study analyzes the effects of transforming a static HTML-based website into a dynamic database-driven one. As part of the study, a small computer company’s static website was redesigned, making it dynamic and database-driven. The theory of Human-Centered Design is applied to a real-world situation and the nine human-centered characteristics are analyzed as they relate to static and dynamic websites
    • Informativeness of Self-Reports of ADHD Symptoms in Monitoring Response to Stimulant Treatment in Clinically Referred Adults With ADHD

      Biederman, Joseph; Fitzgerald, Maura; Spencer, Thomas J.; Adler, Lenard A.; Abrams, Jessica; Biederman, Itai; Faraone, Stephen V. (SAGE Publications, 2018-05-26)
      To investigate the informativeness of self-reports of ADHD symptoms in adults with ADHD in the clinical setting. Method: Subjects were clinically referred adults aged 19 years to 67 years of age of both sexes (N = 54). All subjects were on stable doses of stimulant and were considered responders to treatment. ADHD symptoms were assessed using the ADHD Investigator Symptom Rating Scale (AISRS) and the ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS). Spearman’s rank correlations were used to assess the correlations between clinician-assessed ADHD and patients’ self-reports. Results: Spearman’s rank correlation analysis found evidence of a strong, positive association between total scores on the AISRS and the ASRS (rs = .65, df = 52, p < .001). Conclusion: Results have important implications for the management and monitoring of treatment response in the clinical setting through patients’ self-report.(J. of Att. Dis. 2020; 24(3) 420-424)
    • Integrating Information and Communication Tools Effective Strategies for the Classroom

      Phan, Thuc (2013-05-01)
      This project presents effective strategies for integrating information and communication tools (ICTs) within a class. Three major goals that suggest effective implementation of ICTs are, enhancing education by meeting the needs of different learners, facilitating higher levels of learning, and increasing computer literacy skills. Findings from scholarly articles provided a foundation of methods, principles, and strategies in meeting these goals using ICTs. Implementation of integrating ICTs will be shown with an example computer technology course to demonstrate effective strategies. This example course will be used to present effective strategies that are supported by findings from previous research and will include example learning modules located on a learning management system and routine procedures. The content within the example course will revolve around teaching students computer applications though this subject is not relevant towards meeting any goals for effective implementation if integrating ICTs. This is to suggest that another subject, such as science, can be replaced with teaching computer technology. The main focus within this example course should be on the tools, methods, and procedures of teaching and learning with ICTs and how they are used to enhance the learning environment of this course. The ICTs used in meeting the goals of meeting the needs of different learners, facilitating high levels of learning, and increasing computer literacy skills are Schoology.com, Google Docs, Prezi, and Apple Remote Desktop. These ICTs where chosen based on findings from previous research, observation of trending applications, effectiveness of communication and information management, and potential relevance for the future uses.
    • An Inventory Management App in Salesforce

      Chennamaneni, Rahul Madhava Rao; Chiang, Chen-Fu; Adviser; Novillo, Jorge; Reviewer; Rezk, Mohamed, Reviewer (2016-12-01)
      Salesforce is a cloud-based customer relationship management (CRM) software that accelerates business relationships and can transform the working lives of the team. Marc Benioff developed it in the late 1990s and now it has been announced as the world's most innovative company for six consecutive years by Forbes Magazine [1]. Unlike traditional CRM software, Salesforce is an internet service. It is available with just a sign-up and logs in through a browser, and it is immediately available. It is based on cloud computing, where the customers, without the need of installing any traditional software, can access the cloud, i.e., through the internet, for their business needs [2]. Inventory Management (IM) is the method of controlling and supervising the storage, utilization and ordering of components that an organization can track of their items it sells. It is the act of controlling and administering the quantities of products in the sale. For a business, an inventory is the main asset which represents an investment by the owner until the item is sold [3]. To demonstrate its functionalities of Salesforce, I created an application for inventory management. Here, In the inventory management, there are two parts: one is administration part, and another part is customer portal. The administrator manages the inventory and store operations, and the customer buys the products in the inventory through customer portal.