• OBJECT ORIENTED ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK SIMULATOR IN TEXT AND SYMBOL RECOGNITION

      Piszcz, Alan; Ishaq, Naseem; Advisor; Novillo, Jorge E; Reviewer; Sengupta, Saumendra; Reviewer (1993)
      Objected oriented languages and artificial neural networks are new areas of research and development. This thesis investigates the application of artificial neural networks using an object oriented C++ backpropagation simulator. The application domain investigated is hand printed text and engineering symbol recognition. An object oriented approach to the simulator allows other simulator paradigms to reuse a large body of the object classes developed for this particular application. The review and implementation of image feature extraction methodologies is another area researched in this paper. Four feature techniques are researched, developed, applied and tested, using digits, upper case alphabet characters and engineering symbol images. Final implementation and testing of the feature extraction methods with a baseline technique is analyzed for applicability in the domain of hand printed text and engineering symbols
    • The concept of target features in schizophrenia research

      Tsuang, M. T.; Faraone, S. V. (Wiley, 1999-05)
      Target features are clinical or neurobiological characteristics that arc expressions of the underlying predisposition to an illness. They comprise a wide range of phenomena, from thc classic signs and symptoms of psychopathology to sophisticated measures of brain structure and function. For schizophrenia, many target features have been identified. These include eye tracking dysfunction, attentional impairment, allusive thinking, neurological signs, thought disorder, characteristic auditory evoked potentials, neuropsychological impairment, structural brain abnormalities and functional brain abnormalities. In their most pathological forms, thcse features are present among many schizophrenic patients, yet it is their presence among their non-psychotic relatives that shows them to be target features. We discuss the theoretical background for target features, present examples and describe how the discovery of target features has implications I for schizophrenia research.
    • Pediatric mania: a developmental subtype of bipolar disorder?

      Biederman, Joseph; Mick, Eric; Faraone, Stephen V; Spencer, Thomas; Wilens, Timothy E; Wozniak, Janet (Elsevier BV, 2000-09)
    • Linkage of chromosome 13q32 to schizophrenia in a large veterans affairs cooperative study sample

      Faraone, Stephen V.; Skol, Andrew D.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Bingham, Stephen; Young, Keith A.; Prabhudesai, Sarita; Haverstock, Susan L.; Mena, Felicitas; Menon, Aerath Sri Kumar; Bisset, Darren; et al. (Wiley, 2002-07-29)
      Several prior reports have suggested that chromosomal region 13q32 may harbor a schizophrenia susceptibility gene. In an attempt to replicate this finding, we assessed linkage between chromosome 13 markers and schizophrenia in 166 families, each with two or more affected members. The families, assembled from multiple centers by the Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies Program, included 392 sampled affected subjects and 216 affected sib pairs. By DSM-III-R criteria, 360 subjects (91.8%) had a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 32 (8.2%) were classified as schizoaffective disorder, depressed. The families had mixed ethnic backgrounds. The majority were northern European-American families (n = 62, 37%), but a substantial proportion were African-American kindreds (n = 60, 36%). Chromosome 13 markers, spaced at intervals of approximately 10 cM over the entire chromosome and 2-5 cM for the 13q32 region were genotyped and the data analyzed using semi-parametric affected only linkage analysis. For the combined sample (with race broadly defined and schizophrenia narrowly defined) the maximum LOD score was 1.43 (Z-score of 2.57; P = 0.01) at 79.0 cM between markers D13S1241 (76.3 cM) and D13S159 (79.5 cM). Both ethnic groups showed a peak in this region. The peak is within 3 cM of the peak reported by Brzustowicz et al.
    • Linkage of chromosome 13q32 to schizophrenia in a large veterans affairs cooperative study sample

      Faraone, Stephen V.; Skol, Andrew D.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Bingham, Stephen; Young, Keith A.; Prabhudesai, Sarita; Haverstock, Susan L.; Mena, Felicitas; Menon, Aerath Sri Kumar; Bisset, Darren; et al. (Wiley, 2002-07-29)
      Several prior reports have suggested that chromosomal region 13q32 may harbor a schizophrenia susceptibility gene. In an attempt to replicate this finding, we assessed linkage between chromosome 13 markers and schizophrenia in 166 families, each with two or more affected members. The families, assembled from multiple centers by the Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies Program, included 392 sampled affected subjects and 216 affected sib pairs. By DSM-III-R criteria, 360 subjects (91.8%) had a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 32 (8.2%) were classified as schizoaffective disorder, depressed. The families had mixed ethnic backgrounds. The majority were northern European-American families (n¼62, 37%), but a substantial proportion were African- American kindreds (n¼60, 36%). Chromosome 13 markers, spaced at intervals of approximately 10cMover the entire chromosome and 2–5 cM for the 13q32 region were genotyped and the data analyzed using semiparametric affected only linkage analysis. For the combined sample (with race broadly defined and schizophrenia narrowly defined) the maximum LOD score was 1.43 (Z-score of 2.57; P¼0.01) at 79.0 cM between markers D13S1241 (76.3 cM) and D13S159 (79.5 cM). Both ethnic groups showed a peak in this region. The peak is within 3 cMof the peak reported by Brzustowicz et al. [1999: Am J Hum Genet 65:1096–1103].
    • Evidence for the multigenic inheritance of schizophrenia

      Freedman, Robert; Leonard, Sherry; Olincy, Ann; Kaufmann, Charles A.; Malaspina, Dolores; Cloninger, C. Robert; Svrakic, Dragan; Faraone, Stephen V.; Tsuang, Ming T. (Wiley, 2002-08-21)
      Schizophrenia is assumed to have complex inheritance because of its high prevalence and sporadic familial transmission. Findings of linkage on different chromosomes in various studies corroborate this assumption. It is not known whether these ®endings represent heterogeneous inheritance, in which various ethnic groups inherit illness through different major gene effects, or multigenic inheritance, in which affected individuals inherit several common genetic abnormalities. This study therefore examined inheritance of schizophrenia at different genetic loci in a nationally collected European American and African American sample. Seventy-seven families were previously genotyped at 458 markers for the NIMH Schizophrenia Genetics Initiative. Initial genetic analysis tested a dominant model, with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, depressed type, as the affected phenotype. The families showed one genome-wide significant linkage (Z ¼ 3.97) at chromosome 15q14, which maps within 1 cM of a previous linkage at the a7-nicotinic receptor gene. Chromosome 10p13 showed suggestive linkage (Z ¼ 2.40). Six others (6q21, 9q32, 13q32, 15q24, 17p12, 20q13) were positive, with few differences between the two ethnic groups. The probability of each family transmitting schizophrenia through two genes is greater than expected from the combination of the independent segregation of each gene. Two trait-locus linkage analysis supports a model in which genetic alleles associated with schizophrenia are relatively common in the general population and affected individuals inherit risk for illness through at least two different loci.
    • Treatment of nonpsychotic relatives of patients with schizophrenia: Six case studies

      Tsuang, Ming T.; Stone, William S.; Tarbox, Sarah I.; Faraone, Stephen V. (Wiley, 2002-11-27)
      There is growing support for the notion that the genetic liability for schizophrenia could be manifested in brain dysfunction, even without the full manifestations of schizophrenia [Meehl, 1962, 1989; Seidman, 1997; Faraone et al., 2001]. This liability is characterized clinically by neurologic, neurobiological, psychiatric, neuropsychological, and psychosocial impairments in nonpsychotic, first-degree relatives of people with schizophrenia and includes eye tracking dysfunction [Levy et al., 1994], allusive thinking [Catts et al., 1993], neurologic signs [Erlenmeyer-Kimling et al., 1982], biochemical abnormalities [Callicott et al., 1998], char acteristic auditory evoked potentials [Friedman and Squires-Wheeler, 1994], neuroimaging assessed brain abnormalities [Seidman et al., 1997], and neuropsycho logical impairment [Kremen et al., 1994]. Paul Meehl introduced the term ‘‘schizotaxia’’ in 1962 to describe the genetic predisposition to schizophrenia [Meehl, 1962], and we have modified the concept to take account of subsequent research [Faraone et al., 2000]. The concept of schizotaxia raises at least three fundamental issues: 1) What is the conceptual basis of schizotaxia? 2) Is it a valid syndrome? and 3) perhaps most importantly from the point of view of the eventual prevention of schizo phrenia, is it treatable? In this paper, we review the model of schizotaxia by focusing first on its nature and extent. We then describe preliminary research criteria for its diagnosis in nonpsychotic relatives of schizo phrenic patients, followed by a presentation of our initial attempts to treat schizotaxia. Finally, prospects for the future focus on the need to validate the proposed syndrome further and on the clinical implications of treating schizotaxia.
    • Electronic Text Displays: Reading Rehabilitation of Low Vision Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

      Aquilante, K. (SUNY College of Optometry, 2003-03-23)
      The purpose of this study was to investigate whether reading performance, measured in words per minute, improved during an hour of within-session practice. The reading methods were three computer-generated presentations including (1) MNREAD, a modified page format, (2) RSVP, which presents one word at a time, and (3) SCROLL, where text pans from right to left across a screen. Forty-five young readers with normal vision, forty-five elder readers with normal vision, and forty-five readers with low vision due to age-related macular degeneration read by one of these methods. None of the participants had previous experience reading with MNREAD, RSVP of SCROLL. There was little evidence that within-session practice improved performance. Only 10 of 135 participants had modest reading rate gains, and there was no statistical difference between reading method or subject group for this small subset of readers.
    • Information Design and Technology

      Ossowski, Candice (2004-05-01)
      This case study analyzes the effects of transforming a static HTML-based website into a dynamic database-driven one. As part of the study, a small computer company’s static website was redesigned, making it dynamic and database-driven. The theory of Human-Centered Design is applied to a real-world situation and the nine human-centered characteristics are analyzed as they relate to static and dynamic websites
    • Adoption of the Smart Cart: An Instructional Technology

      Gillander, Peter (2004-05-01)
      The intention of this study is to discover and understand how Instructional Technology is adopted into the classroom. The study also determined what is needed to meet the goals intended for it. The Rome City School District, located in central New York, conducted the Smart Cart pilot program. The research consisted mainly of interviews and observations. The planning and implementation of this pilot program were studied to understand how the adoption of the Smart Cart occurred. These findings were applied to the theories of Human Centered Design and Change. Findings included the identification of barriers to the adoption process, and the needs for meeting the pilot’s goals. Barriers found consisted of breakdowns in planning and communication, and the need for more adequate training. It was also found that the technology was capable of meeting the intended pilot’s goals, but will be more successful when the barriers are addressed.
    • Long-term outcome of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: a meta-analysis and qualitative review of the literature

      Stewart, S. E.; Geller, D. A.; Jenike, M.; Pauls, D.; Shaw, D.; Mullin, B.; Faraone, S. V. (Wiley, 2004-07)
      Objective: To review the extant literature on the long-term outcome of child/adolescent-onset obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Medline and Psychlit databases were systematically searched for articles regarding long-term outcomes of child/adolescent-onset OCD. Meta-analysis regression was applied to evaluate predictors and persistence of OCD. Results: Sixteen study samples (n ¼ 6–132; total ¼ 521 participants) in 22 studies had follow-up periods ranging between 1 and 15.6 years. Pooled mean persistence rates were 41% for full OCD and 60% for full or subthreshold OCD. Earlier age of OCD onset (z ¼ )3.26, P ¼ 0.001), increased OCD duration (z ¼ 2.22, P ¼ 0.027) and inpatient vs. out-patient status (z ¼ 2.94, P ¼ 0.003) predicted greater persistence. Comorbid psychiatric illness and poor initial treatment response were poor prognostic factors. Although psychosocial function was frequently compromised, most studies lacked comprehensive outcome measures. Conclusion: Long-term persistence of pediatric OCD may be lower than believed. Future studies should include broader measures of outcome including symptomatic persistence and functional impairment in multiple domains.
    • The Impact of Staff Development on Middle School Technology Integration

      Scalisi, Regina (2005-05-01)
      This case study describes the impact of technology staff development in two Central New York Middle Schools. The staff development program was implemented under the federally funded Enhancing Education Through Technology grant. Teachers and students were studied during a seven-month period as they learned to effectively use computers, Internet resources and available software with their curricula and instruction. The conditions of Change Theory were applied to the study as they relate to the adoption of technology integration.
    • How is GIS used in a Community College Setting for Architectural Identification

      Judycki, Brian (2005-05-01)
      This case study analyzes how students use an Architectural Identification GIS Application in a community college setting.
    • The Hybrid Course Experience

      Thompson, Jonathan M (2005-05-01)
      This phenomenology analyzes the experience of students and teachers in hybrid (blended) courses in a community college and a university located in central New York.The Constructivist Learning Theory is applied to the hybrid course characteristics and analyzed to determine the effectiveness of hybrid courses. A definition and description of hybrid courses is proposed.
    • The Process of Redesigning and Redeveloping a University Website in the Face of Organizational Change

      Rau, Erika E (2005-05-01)
      This case study analyzes the process of redesigning and redeveloping a university website. An in-depth exploration of decision-making processes, organizational structure, working relationships, communication during change, and the impact these issues have on the process during the beginning stages of the website redesign is examined. Brenda Dervin’s SenseMaking theory is applied and was the key theory that led the research. Tushman and Nadler’s Information Processing theory and Daft and Lengel’s Information Processing and Organizational Design theory was also analyzed and related to this redesign process.
    • Nursing Home Website Review: Are they accessible, usable, and do they meet consumer needs?

      Warchol, Gail (2005-05-01)
      This study addresses a two-part research question: Are nursing home websites easily accessible and used and do they offer enough information for consumers to make informed choices? Research indicated that generally, hospital discharge planners are the ones who initially explain nursing homes to their patients with brochures and other hard copy information. Some consumers, (generally family members of the patients) have visited nursing home websites. A review of nursing home websites found that nursing home guide sites are often used for giving an array of information, including state survey results, quality assurance, staff ratio, and occupancy rates. The internet users who were interviewed stated that nursing home websites are often difficult to locate. Once having found the sites, interviewees ranked resident rights information as being most interesting, especially information on choice-making and how they are treated once in the nursing home.
    • Discovering the meaning of Internet Safety

      Palinski, Kathleen (2005-12-01)
      An in-depth analysis was conducted with the purpose of discovering the meaning of Internet safety. A case study was used to derive themes from multiple sources of data (documents, interviews, observations, artifacts). Data collected during the study includes interviews from elementary teachers, parents, students, and district-level administrators. It also includes a literature review, documents, and the application of Karl Weick’s Organizational Theory. Internet safety problems were studied at a small school district of approximately 2,500 students in central New York State where the case study was conducted. The current software the district uses is a highly restrictive server level program. A dynamic definition of Internet safety is proposed as a result of the case study.
    • The Influence of College Web Sites on the College Selection Process

      Basi Raab, Maryrose (2005-12-01)
      This case study examines the use and influence of college web sites by high school seniors as they move through the college selection process through interviews, directed observations, and focus groups. It discovers and describes the different ways that web sites are used by this bounded group. As a part of the study, the re-designed web site at SUNY Institute of Technology is critiqued and analyzed by respondents. Enhancements are proposed based on the research to increase the effectiveness of the site in its appeal to prospective high school students. The theories of Human-Centered Design and Contextual Design are described and applied to this case study.
    • ADHD Symptoms vs. Impairment: Revisited

      Barkley, Russell A.; Cunningham, Charles E.; Gordon, Michael; Faraone, Stephen V.; Lewandowski, Larry; Murphy, Kevin R. (Guilford Publications, 2006-04)