• Social Justify Your Lesson Plan: How to Use Social Media to Make Pop Culture Scholarly

      Willoughby, Lydia; Blanchat, Kelly (Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook, 2016)
      In this chapter, we describe a lesson plan rooted in feminist pedagogy -- a teaching/learning that actively engages with the material being studied by embracing social media as a viable platform for scholarship. This lesson plan honors that the personal is political and correlates structural and systemic inequity to student experiences of oppression.
    • Social Media as Game Strategy: Twitter in the #infolit Instruction Session

      Willoughby, Lydia; Blanchat, Kelly (2015-06-04)
      The lure of distractions can entice even the strongest of student wills in a computer classroom. Research requires strategic thinking and ordered planning to drown out the noise of online distractions. This poster demonstrates a unique way to capitalize on the natural overlap of research, communication, and social media by employing game strategy to lead learning outcomes for undergraduate student research. Instead of silencing social media, this activity incorporates Twitter as a platform to introduce information literacy concepts and participatory practices of scholarship.
    • State University of New York at Plattsburgh: Immersed in Teaching

      Toth, Michelle (2020)
      A chapter from the book: Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures, Practices, and Contexts. This chapter outlines the structure and processes used in coordinating the library instruction programs at SUNY Plattsburgh’s Feinberg Library. Focus is on our one-credit course, proficiency exam, and one-shot course-related instruction.
    • The "French Traveller," Patrick Henry, and the Contagion of Liberty

      Beatty, Joshua F. (2011-03-26)
      In 1921 the American Historical Review published the journal of a "French traveller" describing his trip to Britain's North American colonies in 1765. From the West Indies, the traveler sailed north to the North Carolina coast and journeyed overland to New York. Over those nine months he broke bread and drank wine with a cross-section of the colonies' wealthiest and most powerful men. The journal is unusual in two ways. First, it was written in English and yet found in a French naval archive. With its detailed descriptions of colonial port cities and their defenses, the journal was apparently written by a spy for Britain's greatest rival. Second, it contains the only extant eyewitness account of the debates in Virginia's House of Burgesses over the Stamp Act. These debates and the set of resolves that emerged served as a spark for resistance to the Stamp Act throughout Britain's North American colonies -- and yet we know little about the drama played out in the Capitol that day. The traveler never revealed his identity within the pages of the journal. Neither the editor of the AHR copy nor later historians could connect the journal to a known historical figure. This paper, then, will reveal the identity of the "French Traveller," reevaluate what the journal tells us in light of the author's identity, and examine the implications on our understanding of how the Virginia House of Burgesses and their resolves ignited colonial resistance to the Stamp Act.
    • The Foundations of Naval Science: Alfred Thayer Mahan’s The Influence of Sea Power on History and the Library of Congress Classification System

      Adams, Ellen E.; Beatty, Joshua F. (Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship, 2017)
      This article is a history of the creation of the Naval Science class within the Library of Congress Classification System (LCCS) during that system’s fashioning and development at the turn of the 20th century. Previous work on the history of classification and especially of the LCCS has looked closely at the mechanics of the creation of such systems and at ideological influences on classification schemes. Prior scholarship has neglected the means by which ideologies are encoded into classification systems, however. The present article examines the history of a single class by looking at the ideological and political assumptions behind that class and the means by which these assumptions were written into the LCCS. Specifically, we argue that the Naval Science class resulted from a concerted effort by naval theorists to raise their field to the status of a science, the interest in Washington’s political class in this new science as a justification for imperial expansion, and a publishing boom in naval matters as the American public became eager consumers of such work during the Spanish-American War. This complex narrative thus illustrates the manifold influences on the creation of any classification system and asks us to consider that multiplicity of influences, whether we as librarians teach about existing systems or work to build new ones.
    • Those Immersed Resurface: A Follow Up with Track 2 Participants of the First Information Literacy Immersion

      Toth, Michelle (College and Research Libraries News, 2003-01)
      So what happens to all those great ideas and all that motivation that we get when we attend conferences and professional development opportunities? In the case of the first Track 2 participants of ACRL's Institute for Information Literacy's Immersion program, quite a lot. Two years after the first Immersion program, a follow-up survey pursued this question and found where great ideas and motivation are taking librarians and the institutions they work for.
    • Zotero: A Tool for Constructionist Learning in Critical Information Literacy

      Beatty, Joshua F. (Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook, 2016)
      The chapter describes a method for teaching Zotero, a bibliographic management program, to undergraduates over the course of a one-shot library instruction session. The session is intended to help students take control of their own sources and research.Students create their own libraries by choosing among sources, then using Zotero to put the material into a form they can organize, annotate, and cite. The process helps students to see themselves as not just consumers but also critics and creators of scholarship.