Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEkstrom, Margaret V.
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T19:25:00Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T19:25:00Z
dc.date.issued10/15/2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/2891
dc.description.abstractIn lieu of an abstract the introductory paragraph is included here. From the earliest days of the Discovery, the Spaniards had problems with naming in the New World. They had difficulties with the pronunciation and spelling of the Indian names for people and places, and they had to accept the native terminology for objects which had no name in Spanish because they did not exist in Spain. Such early chroniclers of the Conquest as Hernan Cortes, Bernal Diaz del Castillo and Bartolome de las Casas wrote with amazement in Spanish of the things they found in the Americas, interspersing variations of the native words along the way. Many such words even found their way into English eventually, such as tomato, chocolate, ocelot and coyote. Nevertheless, Spanish soon established itself as the dominant language of political, economic and social control in Latin America.
dc.subjectNames In Literature
dc.subjectOnomastics In Literature
dc.subjectJose Maria Arguedas
dc.subjectLos Rios Profundos
dc.subjectDeep Rivers
dc.subjectPeru
dc.subjectIncas
dc.titleCrossing Deep Rivers: Jose Maria Arguedas and the Renaming of Peru
dc.typearticle
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T19:25:00Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.source.peerreviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitleLiterary Onomastics Studies
dc.contributor.organizationSt. John Fisher College
dc.languate.isoen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
los/vol16/iss1/9/fulltext (1).pdf
Size:
472.9Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Literary Onomastics Studies
    Literary Onomastics Studies was published from 1974 to 1989 as “the official journal of the proceedings of the annual Conference on Literary Onomastics,” held during those years at SUNY Brockport or in Rochester, New York.

Show simple item record