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dc.contributor.authorBurelbach, Frederick M.
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T19:24:59Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T19:24:59Z
dc.date.issued10/15/2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/2888
dc.description.abstractIn lieu on an abstract, here are a few sentences from an early paragraph of the article. The main premise of this paper is that name-calling- as when youngsters call each other Fatty, Skinny, or Sissy-is a form of authorship as well as an instrument used in maintaining social norms. The name-caller is creating a specific role for the victim by use of a name with particular denotations, connotations, and assumed social values. By so doing, the name-caller is defining an appropriate scope of action or behavior, with expected patterns of response to external events- a plot, if you will- for the victim.
dc.subjectOnomastics In Literature
dc.subjectNames In Literature
dc.subjectShakespeare
dc.subjectHenry Iv Part 1
dc.titleName-Calling as Power Play in Shakespeare's 1 Henry IV
dc.typearticle
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T19:24:59Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.source.peerreviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitleLiterary Onomastics Studies
dc.contributor.organizationThe College at Brockport
dc.languate.isoen_US


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  • Literary Onomastics Studies
    Literary Onomastics Studies was published from 1974 to 1989 as “the official journal of the proceedings of the annual Conference on Literary Onomastics,” held during those years at SUNY Brockport or in Rochester, New York.

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