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dc.contributor.authorFrancis, William A.
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T19:24:57Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T19:24:57Z
dc.date.issued2014-10-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/2879
dc.description.abstractIncluded here is the introductory paragraph of the article. Ken Kesey's first novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, reflects his experiences as a young attendant in two California mental hospitals in which he was employed. Book reviewers spoke highly of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, and recognized the authority with which Kesey captured the day-to-day routines and events in mental wards. Irving Malin observed that One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a gothic novel, for it employs imprisonment, madness, violence and distorted reflections, but it does so in a new way which Malin calls new American gothic. 1 Joseph J. Waldmeir, in a long review-essay, considers One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest a novel of the absurd, ((the first truly successful American novel of the absurd since World War II." 2
dc.subjectKen Kesey
dc.subjectOne Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest
dc.subjectNames In Literature
dc.subjectOnomastics In Literature
dc.titleOf Madness and machines: Names in Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
dc.typearticle
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T19:24:58Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.source.peerreviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitleLiterary Onomastics Studies
dc.languate.isoen_US


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  • Literary Onomastics Studies
    Literary Onomastics Studies was published from 1974 to 1989 as “the official journal of the proceedings of the annual Conference on Literary Onomastics,” held during those years at SUNY Brockport or in Rochester, New York.

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