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dc.contributor.authorMonta, Susannah
dc.contributor.authorOliver, Lisi
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T19:22:44Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T19:22:44Z
dc.date.issued1/1/2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/2841
dc.description.abstractTo date, no consensus has emerged concerning the derivation of Spenser’s names Trevisan and Terwin, the only two characters in Book I’s “Legend of Holiness” whose names are not obviously labels. This essay proposes that Wolfram’s Parzival offers a strong analogue that may also point to a possible origin for the names of Spenser’s Trevisan and Terwin. Further, and most significantly, the comparison between Wolfram’s poem and Spenser’s gives the more important of those two figures, the fearful knight Trevisan, a complex role to play as Spenser probes Protestant theological treatments of despair.
dc.subjectEdmund Spenser
dc.subjectParzival
dc.subjectReformation
dc.titleSpenser, Wolfram, and the Reformation of Despair
dc.typearticle
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T19:22:44Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.source.peerreviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitleJournal of Literary Onomastics
dc.contributor.organizationLouisiana State University
dc.contributor.organizationUniversity of Notre Dame
dc.languate.isoen_US


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