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dc.contributor.authorFalter, Benjamin
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T19:18:05Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T19:18:05Z
dc.date.issued2016-12-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/2670
dc.description.abstractMany Americans are under the impression that slavery ended following the Civil War. However, this is a vast oversimplification of the reality that Black men and women faced in the South after the war’s end. Freedmen’s bureau reports, “Black Codes,” and the research of historians demonstrate the ways in which Black men and women were treated following the end of the Civil War. Comparing the conditions revealed in the aforementioned sources to the conditions Black men and women faced during legal slavery reveals startling similarities. Violence against Blacks continued to be widespread in the post-war period, and many Black men and women were even bought and sold through convict leasing. In short, slavery continued in all but name.
dc.subjectSlavery
dc.subjectAmerican Civil War
dc.subjectReconstruction
dc.subjectEmancipation
dc.subjectRace Relations
dc.titleNeoslavery: The Perpetuation of Slavery After the American Civil War
dc.typearticle
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T19:18:05Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.source.peerreviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitle#History: A Journal of Student Research
dc.contributor.organizationThe College at Brockport
dc.languate.isoen_US


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  • #History: A Journal of Student Research
    #History: A Journal of Student Research is a student driven, peer-reviewed, electronic journal that publishes articles by graduate and undergraduate students from any accredited college or university.

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