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dc.contributor.authorBoyle, Jennifer R.
dc.contributor.authorBoekeloo, Bradley O.
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T17:43:02Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T17:43:02Z
dc.date.issued1/1/2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/2355
dc.description.abstractUsing a cross-sectional survey, data were collected from 265 first-year college students to determine if parent-student alcohol communication is associated with college drinking or drinking consequences and if this relationship is mediated by students’ parental subjective norms, attitudes toward drinking, and perceived risk. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypotheses. Students whose parents talked with them more about the negative effects of alcohol reported more extensive college drinking (ß = 0.12, p < 0.05). Favorable alcohol attitudes were significantly related to both more extensive college drinking (ß = 0.49, p < 0.05) and more drinking consequences (ß = 0.39, p < 0.05). Lower reported perceived risk was significantly related to more drinking consequences (ß = –0.24, p < 0.05). Findings indicate that parental communication regarding the negative effects of alcohol may be ineffective at reducing college drinking or drinking consequences.
dc.titleThe Association Between Parent Communication and College Freshmen's Alcohol Use
dc.typearticle
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Drug Education
dc.source.volume39
dc.source.issue2
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T17:43:02Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.source.peerreviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitleHealth Science Faculty Publications
dc.contributor.organizationThe College at Brockport
dc.contributor.organizationUniversity of Maryland - College Park
dc.languate.isoen_US


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