• Use of PBIS Methods to Reinforce Sportsmanship in a Recreational Setting for Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders

      Egan, Patricia; Brucker, Julie (2017)
      Demonstrate and evaluate the use of a PBIS intervention, "PLAY." Four rules were modeled and a group contingency was used to decrease problem behaviors in a recreational setting. Results showed positive outcomes through the use of PBIS, reinforcing rules, and use of group rewards.
    • The Use of Voice to Empower Community Building

      Richards, Julie; Chisholm, Nydia; Smith, Siera (2022-02-18)
    • User-Generated Content and the Regulation of Reputational Harm: The Boston Marathon Bombing as Case Study

      Medeiros, Ben (2019)
      Calls for internet platforms to perform more proactive moderation of users' speech based on its topical content itself—whether voluntarily or under threat of legal liability—have proliferated in recent years. Using the reputationally-damaging instances of misidentification that occurred during the 2013 search for the Boston Marathon bombers as a case study, this article attempts to construct a more detailed, holistic picture of the mechanisms by which reputationally-problematic speech is negotiated online in the absence of sweeping changes to intermediary liability laws. The article argues that the Boston Marathon case study illustrates a blind spot in the more modest, targeted proposals to reform Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act in America that have appeared in recent years, and ultimately recommends placing additional emphasis on further developing norms of responsible speech in online communities, as their participants are perhaps more receptive to such endeavors than popular caricatures of "internet vigilantes" might suggest.
    • Variability in troglomorphic adaptations of a Mexican cavefish, Poecilia mexicana, from Tabasco, Mexico

      Dieterich, Michael; Lavoie, Kathleen (Scientia Discipulorum: SUNY Plattsburgh, 2006)
      The cavefish Poecilia mexicana, earlier known as Poecilia sphenops, is a live-bearing toothcarp or molly found only in Cueva de las Sardinas (also known as Cueva de Villa Luz or El Azufre), in Tabasco, Mexico. The cave ecosystem is based on mixed energy inputs from sulfur springs and chemolithotrophic baceteria, bats, and skylights. The rich food base supports an amazing population density of the cavefish. Earlier studies reported that the fish showed increasing troglomorphic adaptations in physical characteristics and behaviors as you went deeper into the cave. Data presented on eye size reduction show considerable variation and overlap of data by location sampled, and no statistical analyses were done. We sampled from some of the same areas as earlier studies and from the most remote sites in the cave. Our results show considerable variation in troglomorphy of eye reduction from all locations, and no statistical difference with fish from any part of the cave. Evolutionary pressure to develop troglomorphy may be reduced in this cave because of the rich food base, or hybridization with surface forms may not be limited by physical location within the cave.
    • Vernal Pool Status Following Two Major Disturbances (100 year flood and Hurricane Irene)

      Garneau, Danielle; Schultz, Rachel; Keefe, Ian; Carpenter, Cody (2014)
      Vernal pools are crucial for the survival of herpetofaunal species. These temporary ponds are necessary breeding sites for many amphibious species and act as safe refugia, as many lack permanent predators that would be encountered in other more constant water bodies. The goal of this survey was to relocate and map the area and contagion (i.e., patch isolation, arrangement) of 16 vernal pools located in Rugar Woods, which were previously inventoried by Cody Carpenter 2011. Additionally, we sought to assess these vernal pools, following two severe disturbances, specifically the 100 year flood and Hurricane Irene. A global positioning system (GPS) device was used to mark the size of each vernal pool and georeference them in GIS. Results suggest that large disturbances have affected the distribution and abundance of these pools at Rugar Woods. Specifically, several vernal pools (#7, 8, 9) have now merged into one large pool. Additionally, the abundance of vernal pools has gone from 16 to 7 since 2011. The merging of 3 smaller pools serves to increase area and may support greater species richness including predators, as it may be more permanent. In addition, loss of pools increases pool isolation, perhaps leading to genetic drift effects. Findings from this study offer insights into how large-scale disturbance events can influence herpetofaunal communities.
    • Welcome to the Inaugural Issue

      Kasper, Becky (The Common Good: A SUNY Plattsburgh Journal on Teaching and Learning, 2013)
    • Whitewater Packrafting in Western Nepal

      Tetrault, Ted (2016-12-01)
      This expedition plan outlines a whitewater packrafting trip on the Bheri and Seti Karnali rivers in western Nepal that will serve as my capstone project for the Bachelor’s of Science in the Expeditionary Studies program at SUNY Plattsburgh. While these rivers will count as my own personal senior expedition, the trip in its entirety will also include the running of the Sun Kosi river in eastern Nepal, and that plan can be found in a separate document authored by Alex LaLonde as that segment will be serving as his capstone project for the same program.
    • Why Alaryngeal Speech Has a Reduced Level of Intelligibility and How It Can Be Maximized

      Mattice, Sylvia (2015)
      Treatment protocol for carcinoma of the larynx often involves total laryngectomy, the surgical removal of the larynx. Laryngectomees can achieve voice restoration using the following alaryngeal speech methods: esophageal, electrolaryngeal, pneumatic device, and tracheosophageal speech. This poster investigates the best methods to maximize intelligibility in individuals who use alaryngeal speech.
    • Wildlife Response to Wildfire at the Altona Flat Rock Pine Barren in Northern NY

      Adams, Matthew; Staats, Lloyd; Garneau, Danielle; Lesser, Mark (2019-05)
      In July of 2018, approximately 221 hectares of forest were burned in a wildfire at a sandstone pavement barren in Altona NY. Forest overstory is predominantly Pinus banksiana (Jack Pine) and Betula lenta (Black Birch), whereas understory is comprised of ericaceous shrubs and Pteridium aquilinum (Bracken Fern). Within weeks of the burn, Jack Pine’s sertoninous cone seeds had germinated and regeneration of fern stolons and birch stump sprouts appeared. We sought to monitor wildlife in response to forest regeneration at the sandstone pavement barren burn as compared to a reference (unburned) site. For this study, eight game cameras were installed along transects traversing the burn intensity gradient. Game cameras were equally distributed across the burn and reference sites and remained unbaited. Diel wildlife activity was made possible using camTrap package in R Studio, which organizes image files according to metadata (e.g., time, temperature, species) and facilitates interpretation. Species recorded in the burn sites were, Odocoileus virginianus (White-tailed Deer), Canis latrans (Eastern Coyote), Leporidae (Rabbit family), Lynx rufus (Bobcat), Procyon lotor (Raccoon), and Pekania pennanti (Fisher). In addition to these species, Tamiasciurus hudsonicus (Red Squirrel), Sciurus carolinensis (Gray Squirrel) and Bonasa umbellus (Ruffed Grouse) were observed in the reference but not the burn sites. In fall 2018, species richness was greater (n = 9) on the reference versus the burn sites (n = 6). In addition, there was greater wildlife abundance (n = 98) at the reference versus the burn sites (n = 44). Diel activity differed for some species between sites, in particular White-tailed Deer activity was crepuscular at the reference site, with activity peaks at both 8am and 6pm, as compared to a single longer duration morning activity bout on the burn. Biodiversity typically responds positively to wildfire in response to regeneration; however this was not observed in the first season following the disturbance. Continued monitoring of wildlife in response to wildfire may reveal differing patterns as the forest continues to succeed.
    • Wildlife Response to Wildfire in a Northern New York Jack Pine Barrens

      Cave, Hannah; Adams, Matthew; Jaeger, Tristan; Peet, Taylor; Staats, Lloyd; Garneau, Danielle; Lesser, Mark (MDPI AG, 2021-05-25)
      Natural disturbances are an integral part of forested ecosystem function and successional path-ways. In many forested ecosystems, wildfires are critical to shaping composition and structure, which in turn has major implications for wildlife usage and behavior. In July 2018 a wildfire burned 225 ha of the Altona Flat Rock pine barrens in northern New York. This event presented the opportunity to study how wildlife respond to the immediate effects of disturbance in this unique habitat but also how that response would change through time as regeneration progressed. Game cameras were deployed from September 2018-September 2020 at two reference (unburned) and two disturbed (burned) sites within the pine barrens. We analyzed total and seasonal occurrences, to determine how usage differed between disturbed and reference conditions, and with time since disturbance. Additionally, for coyote (Canis latrans, Say), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus, Zimmermann), and snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus, Erxleben), we evaluated daily activity patterns and overlap to determine how predator-prey relationships differed between conditions, and with time since disturbance. Over 730 days a total of 1,048 wildlife occurrences were captured across 23 wildlife species. Fifty-seven percent of all occurrences were at reference sites with over 100 more occurrences than disturbed sites, however, differences were most pronounced immediately following the fire and overall occurrences have grown more similar between the sites over time. Specifically, deer and hare were found more often at reference sites immediately following the fire, but shifted to using both conditions equally by the first growing season. Habitat overlap among sympatric prey (deer, hare) can be explained by understory regeneration increasing foraging opportunities and concealment cover in the disturbed condition, while predators (coyotes) tracked prey availability regardless of the habitat condition. This study provides wildlife management guidance on habitat use and response to disturbance for this unique sandstone pavement barrens.
    • Woman-As-Symbol: Intersections of Indian Nationalism, Gender, and Identity

      Rao, Shakuntala (Women's Studies International Forum, 1999)
      The purpose of this article is to explore the connection between Indian nationalism and gender identity. I provide a critique of Radhakrishnan and Chatterjee's notion of the outer/inner dichotomy of Indian nationalism by stating that religion, in postcolonial India, has emerged as a discursive totality that has subsumed the politics of indigenous or inner identity more so than other rhetoric of caste, tribal, gender, and class. I provide a groundwork for this debate via the writings of Nehru and Gandhi. I conclude, through an analysis of the practices of amniocentesis and Sati, that women and their bodies have been used as representations of the conflicts surrounding national subjectivity.
    • Women in Combat: A Historical Perspective

      Student, United States Military Academy; Streatfield, Samir (2014-04-30)
      This paper seeks to provide a general template for determining the nature of, and reasons behind, the employment of women in warfare. I focus on groups of women who fought as formal combat components of historical military forces in order to explain the general socio-cultural, military, and situational factors that led to the employment of women in combat. My conclusions are that two factors: societal license to fight and the presence of battlefield roles with able women to fill them, were necessary for the regular employment of women in combat. However, I also found that under desperate circumstances in existential conflicts, societies, regardless of their disposition towards women or traditional battlefield roles, would employ women in combat to stave off destruction. My sources are drawn from a wide variety of historical records of women in combat, including writings of Plutarch and Appian, and modern analyses of archeological findings that suggest martial roles for women. The scope of this paper is from the 6th Century BCE to 1900 CE.
    • Writing for the Community: Building Better Citizens in the Professional Writing Classroom

      Devine, Julia (The Common Good: A SUNY Plattsburgh Journal on Teaching and Learning, 2014)
      In the fight for the future of the humanities, can teaching grant writing help? This article explores the relationship between civic engagement, the humanities, and the nonprofit world. I demonstrate how my grant writing class gave students not only professional grant writing experience, but also engaged them deeply in the Plattsburgh community and the wider world. I conclude that a classroom emphasizing collaborative learning and community connections makes students into better professionals and better citizens.
    • Zotero: A Tool for Constructionist Learning in Critical Information Literacy

      Beatty, Joshua F. (Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook, 2016)
      The chapter describes a method for teaching Zotero, a bibliographic management program, to undergraduates over the course of a one-shot library instruction session. The session is intended to help students take control of their own sources and research.Students create their own libraries by choosing among sources, then using Zotero to put the material into a form they can organize, annotate, and cite. The process helps students to see themselves as not just consumers but also critics and creators of scholarship.