• Sawtooth 2013: An Expedition into the Idaho Wilderness

      Henley, Casey; Soroka, Larry; Davidson, Cedar; Mossey, Andy (2013)
      This proposal will give you a detailed understanding of my planned expedition to the Sawtooth wilderness in March of 2013. Within these pages you will find a brief history of the area, some geological background, a glimpse at the types of wildlife you would likely find in the Sawtooth, as well as my detailed trip plans. This proposal is written as partial completion of the requirements for my Senior Expedition class with SUNY Plattsburgh's Expeditionary Studies program. The structure of the proposal is modeled to simulate the level of preparation needed for a professional expedition proposal. It includes a risk management plan, emergency protocols, detailed meal plan, and equipment list satisfactory for a multi-week ski mountaineering expedition. This proposal also includes a system of assessing risk and making decisions which I outline in the section titled: Go/No Go Standards. You will also find an analysis of the Sawtooth snowpack up to the date on the cover of this proposal as well as an essay on leadership in the outdoor industry and a section for my personal and professional goals. Additional information includes a budget, a training and conditioning plan, and my contingency plans.This proposal will give you an idea of the type of planning required to launch a multi-week expedition into a remote location, and maybe give you ideas for a trip of you own. Keep in mind, some of the planning procedures are specific to my experience and preference and follow guidelines put in place by the Expeditionary Studies Department.
    • Sea Kayaking North Carolina's Outer Banks

      Waring, Allison; Dahlquist, Kari (2010)
      EXP 436: Senior Expedition may appear at first glance to be just one of the many courses listed on an expeditionary studies student's Curriculum Advising & Program Planning (CAPP) Report. However, an expeditionary studies student's senior expedition is more than your average class. It is the capstone course in the program, requiring the student to use all the knowledge and skills they have developed over the past three years, culminating in a student planned and run expedition. My expedition has been set for May 2010, and will take place along the North Carolina Coast. Myself and one other partner will paddle the 70 nautical miles of Cape Lookout National Seashore and an additional 20 nautical miles of Ocracoke region of Cape Hatteras National Seashore. We will travel in an effort to learn more about the area's natural and cultural history, as well as in search of good surf beach or two. In the process we will spend approximately six nights primitive camping on the barrier islands following Leave No Trace guidelines. Some highlights of the trip will include visiting the historic Cape Lookout and Ocracoke lighthouses and the historic city of Ocracoke, exploring the abandoned town of Porthsmouth, spotting wild ponies on Shackleford Island, and the opportunity to experience rough water and surf. This trip will involve a moderate degree of difficulty. We will be paddling around fifteen nautical miles a day on the exposed Atlantic Coastal shoreline, allowing for the daily possibility of moderate wind and swell, caused by inclement weather. However, given the geography of the barrier islands there is the option, should the conditions arise, to take an alternate route inland through the Intracoastal Waterway. We may also choose this route for one or two days of travel, to be able to experience the marsh ecosystem that exists on the protected side of these barrier islands. Although the Outer Banks only have a small two-foot tidal range some of the inlets that cut through the barrier islands can have currents in excess of three knots. While manageable, proper planning and timing will make travel much easier. This expedition is sure to test my planning, personal paddling, and camping skills. There is no doubt in my mind that it will be a challenging experience, but will hopefully be an enjoyable one as well. In the following pages you find the written result of the planning process for this expedition.
    • Seen, But Now Heard: How Increased LGBT Visibility Contributed to Cultural Acceptance of Gay Marriage

      Milone, Abigail (2016-04-30)
      With the Supreme Court's ruling in Oberfegell v. Hodges on June 26 of this past year, the long-standing fight for gay rights finally reached its peak with the national legalization of gay marriage. In comparison to the shift favoring the women's rights and civil rights movements, which happened gradually over nearly two hundred years, public opinion and legal opinion on gay rights reversed in an historical instant in the 35 years since 1980, and even grew to include mass support of gay marriage, a concept that had never even been seriously considered prior to this period. How did this change happen so rapidly? As an analysis of polling data, news articles and government documents demonstrates, no singular event, court case, or public policy was fully responsible; rather it was any event that made the LGBT population more visible and therefore more widely understood and tolerated, beginning with the AIDS crisis and extending to legal and non-legal actions. More hidden than other previously marginalized groups, the gay marriage movement gained momentum so quickly because it was launched into public consciousness through the forced unmasking and voluntary coming out of LGBT people. The act of distinguishing themselves through coming out gave LGBT people a continuous way to assert their identity and keep gay rights, including gay marriage, in the news and in people's minds.
    • Sensorimotor Intervention for Feeding Management in the Preterm Population

      Windley, Tatiana (2016)
      Oral feeding difficulty is a common complication facing infants born preterm. Preterm infants are not fully developed; therefore the coordination and function needed to perform the suck and swallow become disrupted. Studies have shown that oral stimulation and tactile stimulation are beneficial. Oral stimulation provides direct, targeted input to the oral structures involved in feeding, while tactile stimulation may facilitate motor development. This poster will review the efficacy of these approaches.
    • Service Learning as a Pedagogical Tool for Citizen Stewards

      Kulkarni, Tara (The Common Good: A SUNY Plattsburgh Journal on Teaching and Learning, 2014)
      Service-Learning is an effective pedagogical tool in which students apply their classroom learning to help communities in need. Six service-learning projects were conducted in an introductory environmental engineering classroom. In four of the six projects, undergraduate students worked with local K-12 school students in various projects involving Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) in environmental science and engineering. This paper describes two of the projects, and some student reflections along with my notes on the experience.
    • Shake This Square World and Blast Off for Kicksville: Teaching History with Post-WWII Prescriptive Classroom Films

      Neuhaus, Jessamyn (The History Teacher, 2010-11)
      The article discusses using social adjustment films from the late 1940s to the 1960s to teach students about U.S. history. It examines several films' themes including sexuality, manners, and drug use. Other films concerned safety, driving, and dating. The author reflects on her students' reactions to the films and analyzes humor as an educational tool. Several prescriptive classroom films are discussed, including "Marijuana" starring singer Sonny Bono, "A Date With Your Family" and "What to Do on a Date." The article also comments on viewing these mental hygiene films as reactions to social change.
    • A short proof and generalization of Lagrange's theorem on continued fractions

      Northshield, Sam (American Mathematical Monthly, 2011)
      We present a short new proof that the continued fraction of a quadratic irrational eventually repeats. The proof easily generalizes; we construct a large class of functions which, when iterated, must eventually repeat when starting with a quadratic irrational.
    • Should Malingering Matter to Speech Language Pathologists?

      Hungerford, Suzanne; Bassendowski, Nancy (2009)
      Malingering, or the intentional feigning of illnesses or disorders for secondary gain, is a financial and legal burden to society. Documented malingered disorders that are of particular interest to speech-language pathologists (SLPs) include malingered dysphagia, stuttering, mutism, dysphonia, language disorders, and cognitive impairment. Unfortunately, little information on malingering is available to SLPs. In this presentation we will introduce SLPs to issues of malingering, and provide information on how to address malingering in the assessment process.
    • Small Mammal Community Response to Wildfire at the Altona Flat Rock Sandstone Pavement Barren

      Garneau, Danielle; Hendrick, Michala; Darienzo, Lauren; Farr, Emily; Epifaino, Alex; Garneau, Danielle (2021-03-17)
      The Altona Flat Rock is a sandstone pavement barren, dominated by the fire-dependent species known as Pinus banksiana (Jack Pine). Changes in seed availability, understory structure, and predator presence influence wildlife migration within the barren. Additionally, small mammal abundance often fluctuates cyclical in response to tree masting. In July 2018, a wildfire occurred at the Flat Rock pine barren. We aimed to monitor small mammal response to wildfire over the course of a year. Small mammal traps were set along established transects capturing the fire severity gradient and adjacent reference unburned area. Along those same transects, giving up density surveys (GUDS) were performed to foraging patterns in these varied microhabitats. We predicted greater capture rates and community diversity in the burn immediately post-fire due to access to the abundant serotinous Jack Pine seeds. In fall 2018 immediately following the wildfire, a total of 67 small mammals were captured with 1.5 times more in the unburned than burned area. The small mammal community consisted of Peromyscus spp. comprising 87% of captures and insectivores Sorex cinereus (Masked Shrew) and Blarina brevicauda (Northern Short-tailed Shrew) were absent from the burn. In fall of 2019, a total of 21 small mammals were captured with 3 times more in the burn than in unburned area. Community composition was exclusively Peromyscus spp. Over the course of a year, we noted a significant reduction in captures and a shift in microhabitat usage from unburned (2018) to burn (2019) likely in response to regenerating vegetation ameliorating predation risk. Interestingly, average body mass and total body length were higher in Peromyscus spp. in 2019, perhaps in response to increased seed predation. GUD survey results show seed foraging was 67% greater in 2018. Collaborators monitoring game cameras at the barren noted increased predator use of the unburned and burned areas in winter 2018 and spring 2019, respectively and a significant decline of predators from the area in late summer-fall 2019. A predator decrease in fall 2019 is paralleled with a significant decline in Peromyscus spp. This preliminary research has revealed the complexity of small mammal response to wildfire. Long-term monitoring will likely uncover their connection to resources, microhabitat structure, and predator abundance as regeneration continues.
    • Social Communication Training for Adults with Traumatic Brain Injury and Quality of Life Improvements

      Vetro, Noelle (2015)
      Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause a variety of communicative deficits. These deficits impact on an individual’s social interactions and quality of life. This poster outlines the social communication problems that often occur secondary to TBI, the rehabilitation strategies for social communication, and the outcome on the individual’s quality of life.
    • Social Justify Your Lesson Plan: How to Use Social Media to Make Pop Culture Scholarly

      Willoughby, Lydia; Blanchat, Kelly (Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook, 2016)
      In this chapter, we describe a lesson plan rooted in feminist pedagogy -- a teaching/learning that actively engages with the material being studied by embracing social media as a viable platform for scholarship. This lesson plan honors that the personal is political and correlates structural and systemic inequity to student experiences of oppression.
    • Social Media as Game Strategy: Twitter in the #infolit Instruction Session

      Willoughby, Lydia; Blanchat, Kelly (2015-06-04)
      The lure of distractions can entice even the strongest of student wills in a computer classroom. Research requires strategic thinking and ordered planning to drown out the noise of online distractions. This poster demonstrates a unique way to capitalize on the natural overlap of research, communication, and social media by employing game strategy to lead learning outcomes for undergraduate student research. Instead of silencing social media, this activity incorporates Twitter as a platform to introduce information literacy concepts and participatory practices of scholarship.
    • Sonia Sotomayor’s Legal Phenomenology, Racial Policing, and the Limits of Law

      McMahon, John (University of Chicago Press, 2021-10-01)
      Sonia Sotomayor’s dissent in the Fourth Amendment case Utah v. Strieff (2016) received a great deal of media attention, particularly for its citations to prominent Black political thinkers and its evocations of Black Lives Matter. This article interprets Justice Sotomayor’s dissent as constructing an emergent legal theory that incorporates Black Lives Matter and the experiences of people of color subject to being stopped and searched into the core of Fourth Amendment jurisprudence. In contrast to Clarence Thomas’s abstracted majority opinion, I argue Sotomayor contests the meaning of law’s relations to subjects, bringing the feeling, moving, restrained, invaded, prodded, shaped, habitual, racialized subject of the police stop into Supreme Court legal reasoning. In tension with Sotomayor’s phenomenological alternative are structural and institutional constraints on the liberatory possibilities for any Supreme Court dissent, particularly one focused on racial injustice. The article argues for recognizing both the generativity of the emergent legal phenomenology and the constraints on its politics in order to grapple with the potential for legal critique to surface from what Sotomayor calls law’s “cold abstractions.”
    • Sonnets for Remembrance

      Stone, Jennifer (2011)
    • Spatial and Temporal Distribution and Abundance Microplastics in Lake Champlain Long-Term Monitoring Samples

      Garneau, Danielle; Allen, Eileen; Hagar, Susan-Marie; Austin, Lindsey (2017)
      Microplastics are particles less than 5mm in size, characterized as fibers, fragments, beads, foams, and pellets. Microplastics (MP) arise from four main processes: environmental degradation (UV exposure, mechanical and/or biological), direct release by means of wastewater treatment processing, unintentional loss of raw materials, and discharge of macerated wastes. Microplastics are potentially toxic to aquatic biota and the presence of microplastics in freshwater ecosystems is largely under-researched. The goal of our research was to examine the spatial and temporal distribution of microplastics and pre-production particulate (nurdles) from long-term monitoring (LTM) zooplankton samples within Lake Champlain collected between 1992-2016. Nurdles were counted in full from samples, whereas microplastics (e.g., fragments, fibers) were subsampled due to size. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) characterized nurdles as polyisoprene rubber ribbon. Within the LTM samples (n = 2265), nurdles (n = 3455) and microplastics (n = 249), predominantly fibers, were identified. The greatest microplastic abundance was noted in 2015 (n = 73 microplastics, n = 494 samples). Nurdles were found only in samples that had been collected 2012-2016, with the greatest nurdle abundance noted in 2012 (n = 1,169 nurdles, n = 412 samples) and at varying depths. Nurdle abundance declined since the 2012 peak and in 2015 was greatly reduced (n = 531 nurdles, n = 494 samples). Spatial distribution maps suggest the complexity of the story with high abundances at deep central locations, as well as shallow isolated bays. The high influx of nurdles in 2012 may be related to the 2011 Lake Champlain flood; however more research will need to be conducted to tease apart timing and potential nurdle point-sources (e.g., train tracks, industrial/urban centers).
    • Species Verification of Peromyscus spp. through Salivary Amylase Gel Electrophoresis

      Garneau, Danielle; Goldberg, Brett; Bishop, Charles (2014)
      Often field identification of sympatric organisms becomes difficult when species are morphologically and behaviorally similar. Additionally, regional traits unique to subspecies further confound typical field marking identification techniques (e.g., tail length: body length ratios, tail bi-coloration). The importance of this verification might bring to question historic range maps and biodiversity trends in earlier published research which relied heavily on field markings. This field and lab-based study was performed to help verify field identification of white-footed mice (<em>Peromyscus leucopus</em>) (Fig. 1a) and deer mouse (<em>Peromyscus maniculatus</em>)(Fig. 1b) using a salivary amylase gel electrophoresis assay. Saliva samples were extracted from captured <em>Peromyscus</em> spp. from four different locations in NY, PA, and MA. Mice captured in NY were identified in the field as both species. Interestingly, mice in New York surveys captured within mixed forest sites were found to be of both species, whereas those captured on the sandstone pavement barren site were all <em>P. leucopus</em>. Researchers in PA identified all mice in the field as <em>P. leucopus</em>; however, salivary amylase results suggest that these species are in fact sympatric. Contrastingly, at the MA site all mice were identified in the field as <em>P. leucopus</em>, and gel verification supported this finding. This research suggests the need for molecular verification in all biodiversity surveys where species identity is uncertain. Additionally, this technique has provided an interesting future research avenue which suggests that conditions on the Altona flat rock barren are more favorable for <em>P. leucopus</em>.
    • Square Roots of 2x2 Matrices

      Northshield, Sam (2010)
      This paper is designed to pique the interest of undergraduate students who are familiar with the concepts of linear algebra. We investigate five methods of computing square roots of two-by-two matrices. Each method gives rise to applications and examples. Topics touched upon include solutions to Abel's functional equation, Fibonacci numbers, Mobius transformations, systems of differential equations, Newton's method applied to matrices (including surprising pictures and open questions), continued fraction representations of matrices, quadratic number fields, and quadratic forms.
    • State University of New York at Plattsburgh: Immersed in Teaching

      Toth, Michelle (2020)
      A chapter from the book: Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures, Practices, and Contexts. This chapter outlines the structure and processes used in coordinating the library instruction programs at SUNY Plattsburgh’s Feinberg Library. Focus is on our one-credit course, proficiency exam, and one-shot course-related instruction.
    • The Stuttering Brain: Activation Patterns and Anatomy Differences

      Torrans, Laura (2014)
      The brain activation and anatomy differences seen in people who stutter is examined. The significance of right hemisphere overactivation and left hemisphere activation patterns, as well as pertinent gray and white matter differences are compared across research studies. Recent research on the connectivity of the basal ganglia, thalamus, and cortical circuit as it relates to the neural mechanism of stuttering are also discussed.