• Do Executive Skills or Language Skills Best Predict Social Competence?

      Hungerford, Suzanne; Gonyo, Katharine; Whitford, Shasta; Bassendowski, Nancy (2009)
      Research has shown that children with developmental language impairment are at high risk for social and behavioral problems, although the reasons for this relationship are not entirely clear. Some have proposed that language impairment leads to social and behavioral problems, while others have suggested that there is some other mediating factor. In this study, executive dysfunction was found to be a powerful predictor of social skills and problem behaviors, while language alone was not.
    • Executive Functions and Their Relationship to Social Skills and Problem Behaviors

      Hungerford, Suzanne; Gonyo, Katharine; Whitford, Shasta; Bassendowski, Nancy (2009)
      This study examined social, behavioral, and executive function characteristics in a group of children referred for auditory and language processing assessment. Teacher ratings of executive functions were compared to parent ratings to determine if teacher's or parent's ratings are better predictors of social skill deficits or problem behaviors. Further, eight executive function skills were examined to determine which are most related to social skills and which are most related to problem behaviors.
    • Should Malingering Matter to Speech Language Pathologists?

      Hungerford, Suzanne; Bassendowski, Nancy (2009)
      Malingering, or the intentional feigning of illnesses or disorders for secondary gain, is a financial and legal burden to society. Documented malingered disorders that are of particular interest to speech-language pathologists (SLPs) include malingered dysphagia, stuttering, mutism, dysphonia, language disorders, and cognitive impairment. Unfortunately, little information on malingering is available to SLPs. In this presentation we will introduce SLPs to issues of malingering, and provide information on how to address malingering in the assessment process.