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dc.contributor.authorBansal, Sheel
dc.contributor.authorWilcox, Douglas A.
dc.contributor.authorLishawa, Shane C.
dc.contributor.authorTangen, Brian A.
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-07T17:40:56Z
dc.date.available2021-09-07T17:40:56Z
dc.date.issued1/1/2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/2228
dc.description.abstractTypha is an iconic wetland plant found worldwide. Hybridization and anthropogenic disturbances have resulted in large increases in Typha abundance in wetland ecosystems throughout North America at a cost to native floral and faunal biodiversity. As demonstrated by three regional case studies, Typha is capable of rapidly colonizing habitats and forming monodominant vegetation stands due to traits such as robust size, rapid growth rate, and rhizomatic expansion. Increased nutrient inputs into wetlands and altered hydrologic regimes are among the principal anthropogenic drivers of Typha invasion. Typha is associated with a wide range of negative ecological impacts to wetland and agricultural systems, but also is linked with a variety of ecosystem services such as bioremediation and provisioning of biomass, as well as an assortment of traditional cultural uses. Numerous physical, chemical, and hydrologic control methods are used to manage invasive Typha, but results are inconsistent and multiple methods and repeated treatments often are required. While this review focuses on invasive Typha in North America, the literature cited comes from research on Typha and other invasive species from around the world. As such, many of the underlying concepts in this review are relevant to invasive species in other wetland ecosystems worldwide.
dc.subjectEverglades
dc.subjectHybrid Vigor
dc.subjectHydrology
dc.subjectInvasive Species
dc.subjectLaurentian Great Lakes
dc.subjectNutrient Enrichment
dc.subjectPrairie Pothole Region
dc.subjectTypha Angustifolia
dc.subjectTypha Domingensis
dc.subjectTypha × Glauca
dc.subjectTypha Latifolia
dc.titleTypha (Cattail) Invasion in North American Wetlands: Biology, Regional Problems, Impacts, Ecosystem Services, and Management
dc.typearticle
dc.source.journaltitleWetlands
dc.source.volume39
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-07T17:40:56Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY Brockport
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.description.publicationtitleEnvironmental Science and Ecology Faculty Publications
dc.contributor.organizationThe College at Brockport
dc.languate.isoen_US


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