• Black youth identity development: using the Black Lives Matter movement as a wake-up call for improved cultural attunement for non-black human service workers

      Rodriguez, Tiana (2021-05)
      When considering youth development, it is essential to differentiate between non-Black youth and Black youth. Black youth may be struggling in other departments with family, addictions, homelessness, etc. but it is also essential to keep in mind that they are also Black which instantly puts targets on their back literally and figuratively due to institutionalized racism and the white supremacy so deeply rooted in our society. This is why using a human rights framework is significant to understanding and aiding Black youth development. Human service workers are historically human rights advocates, so this is a part of the work that they do.
    • Constructing Jewish bodies in Germany through physical culture and racial pseudo-science

      Alperin, Marissa (2018-05)
      As industrialization heightened in Europe, so did science and technological innovation. The expanded focus on human biology, evolution and genetics coincided with the growth of racism in Europe. In Germany, one group of people who were subjugated, was the Jewish population. Since, Jewish racism was a phenomenon in Europe during the physical culture movement, scientific “findings” were used in Germany to suggest that the intellectual abilities and physical beauty of Jews were inferior to the Nordic race. As a result of social, political, economic, religious, and cultural factors, Jewish bodies were projected as being abnormal. Thus, pseudoscience was used as a tool for reinventing/protecting the German nation by preserving the blood of the glorious bodily conception of the German people.
    • The economics of stress and education for the low income area schools of the USA

      Randazzo, Peter (2018-05)
      Economics, racism, and education all play a very important part in today’s society. The history of these themes in America have determined a state of existence for many minority and low income neighborhoods. This thesis attempts to show that because of inequality in America, schools in low income communities suffer, and thus the students themselves suffer. In order to completely change this negative feedback loop, where low income area students go into underprivileged schools to experience classrooms which lacks resources and low graduation rates come out to a racist and strife ridden community, we need to give more federal funding to low income area schools. Low income areas suffer high rates of stress as well which also diminish low income test scores and graduation rates. In order to help these communities from the inside out, improved federal funding targeting these struggling schools can even the playing field, and lower rates of stress.
    • How judicial action on racial gerrymandering has failed communities of color

      Ryan, Maeve (2021-05)
      Decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court have resulted in the allowance of both partisan and racial gerrymandering in certain cases. This research seeks to identify the impact that this precedent has on the substantive representation of people of color. The majority-minority district is the key example of racial gerrymandering that is currently legal in the United States. The congressional election results of six states were compiled to identify the impact that the use of majority-minority districts has on the number of votes that were essentially “wasted” in these elections. The findings suggest that majority-minority districts are being used as a method partisan gerrymandering. They also suggest that the votes of people of color within these districts are “wasted” and diluted at a much higher rate than other districts. The research concludes that the use of majority-minority districts is resulting in a loss of substantive representation for people of color.
    • Literature for liberation: the development and application of black children’s literature

      Vasta, Tessa America (2021-05)
      One of the greatest injustices being committed against minority people in the United States is a lack of representation in literature. The curriculum being used in the vast majority of schools lacks representation of anyone who is not white. The few times minorities are represented, it is stereotypical or racist. This lack of representation ultimately silences students and discourages them from engaging in school. Which then snowballs into greater problems later on, fewer opportunities, dropping out, school to prison pipeline. In order to lessen the achievement gap between white students and students of color, improvements must be made in the US education system.
    • A Re-evaluation on racism: how a strong U.S. tradition of anti Mexican sentiment was responsible for the 1930s Mexican repatriation crisis

      Donofrio, Nikki (2018-10)
      My paper will discuss the events that led to the 1930s Mexican repatriation crisis as well as the social and cultural motivations of racism that allowed for both the local and national government to repatriate around 400,000 Mexicans during 1930-32. The most agreed upon number is 400,000 and that includes lawful U.S. residents, illegal aliens, and Mexican Americans who were U.S. citizens. While it has most often been cited as an outcome of the economic depression during the late 1920s and early 1930s, the specific brand of anti Mexican racism that flourished post 1924 Immigration Act cannot be ignored. By looking at specific case studies, such as the Los Angeles La Placita Raid and repatriation processes in cities like Detroit and Gary, Indiana, I was able to identify a frustration targeted against anyone Mexican, automatically labeled a non-citizen, disguised as economic anxiety. These events and the racism that motivated them cannot be ignored, especially in today’s mindset of ‘America First’.
    • Why there are no black Dominicans: how anti-Haitian sentiment in the era of Trujillo and the deeply rooted black history of the island of Hispaniola affects how Dominicans racially identify in New York today

      Frasco, Melissa (2020-12)
      Within the island of Hispaniola are two countries: the Dominican Republic and Haiti. In 1808 the island was split into two distinct areas and today remains segregated geographically and culturally. Haiti is often associated with poverty, corrupt governments, and blackness, while the Dominican Republic is associated with tropical vacations, baseball, and the Caribbean. By considering the role of socio-political, historical, and ethno-cultural factors in Dominicans’ racial self-identification, this study examines why some Dominicans may not identify as “Black” despite the history of the African slave trade across the island. Using a snowball sampling method to identify study participants, I interviewed Dominican individuals about their racial self- identification and the cultural factors that influenced them. The view of race will be recognized as both a construct and as a significant factor in one’s identity. My research provides insights into how Dominicans in New York identify ethnically, racially, and culturally. Dominicans have a complicated relationship with race, partially due to the thirty-year reign of General Rafael Trujillo, whose promotion of a racial ideology associates blackness with Haitians rather than Dominicans, the historical colonization of the island, post-coloniality, and migration. Dominicans have a notoriously complicated relationship with blackness, when referred to as Black (in the United States) some Dominicans are quick to retort back phrases such as “I’m not Black, I’m Dominican!”. The Dominican racial identity and its relationship with the country of Haiti cannot be explained by the simplicity of the United States racial binary of Black or white. However, Dominicans have historically migrated to states such as New York, New Jersey, and Florida and continue to straddle racial imaginaries spanning from Latin America and the Caribbean to the receiving country.