• Engineering with a purpose: nontraditional perspectives

      Gangewere, Megan (2018-05)
      In this thesis, a short film titled “Engineering with a Purpose: Nontraditional Perspectives” is produced. A film written, edited, and produced by a mechanical engineering undergraduate was something outside of the norm for a final report. In order to successfully create a film, research on the types and style of films was performed. Movavi Editor software was utilized for purposes of editing. This film challenges perspectives and opens eyes to the cross-disciplinary skills engineering requires while drawing attention to the lessons engineers can learn from other disciplines. The meaning, history and stereotypical views that engineering possesses is expressed. The correlations between philosophy and engineering are filmed with an Ancient Greek Socratic lens. The challenges women must overcome in a predominantly male field are conveyed. Inspirational and telling clips to encourage young women considering engineering concludes this portion of the film. Art and engineering is also expressed through the opportunities 3D manufacturing provides. The film is concluded with multiple languages to open the audience eyes that the basis of engineering, problem solving, is nondiscriminatory. The film’s mission is to inspire non-engineers about how they can relate to engineering practice while motivating current engineers to never give up. It also draws attention to the role an engineer plays in society for progress and future development. Creating a film was a whole design process that required countless iterations. Motivation for this film stemmed from professional opportunities with a mechanical engineering degree and the potential positive impacts and purposeful work engineering requires.
    • Exploring love languages: the key to building and maintaining healthy relationships

      Adams, Aryiah (2020-05)
      Communication is the heart of who we are as human beings. It is just as necessary as food and shelter because communication allows us to develop a civilized society that can transmit valuable information and knowledge. The desire to be loved and nurtured is also a fundamental human need that can be expressed through language. Through a series of interviews, the paper explores five “love languages” developed by Dr Gary Chapman used to communicate emotional fulfillment. The paper challenges the idea that time is a key component to the development of the five love languages. The research demonstrates that over time individuals discover their love language and that of their partner. Time further serves as a learning period that allows couples to recognize the emotional desires of their partner. Time then becomes the impetus for consistent acts of love creating growth between couples as they express love their partner accepts. The five love languages speak to the basic fundamentals needed to communicate love.