• Exploring love languages: the key to building and maintaining healthy relationships

      Adams, Aryiah (2020-05)
      Communication is the heart of who we are as human beings. It is just as necessary as food and shelter because communication allows us to develop a civilized society that can transmit valuable information and knowledge. The desire to be loved and nurtured is also a fundamental human need that can be expressed through language. Through a series of interviews, the paper explores five “love languages” developed by Dr Gary Chapman used to communicate emotional fulfillment. The paper challenges the idea that time is a key component to the development of the five love languages. The research demonstrates that over time individuals discover their love language and that of their partner. Time further serves as a learning period that allows couples to recognize the emotional desires of their partner. Time then becomes the impetus for consistent acts of love creating growth between couples as they express love their partner accepts. The five love languages speak to the basic fundamentals needed to communicate love.
    • Feminist Woolf, her literary mothers, sisters and daughters

      O’Toole, Elizabeth (2021-05)
      A look at the works of Virginia Woolf and her treatment of the marriage plot. She advocates for autonomy and education in a “Room of One’s Own” but many times does not give that option to her protagonists. I looked at other female authors such as Bronte, Austen, Shelley, L.M. Montgomery, Chopin, Morrison, and the autonomy they give their female protagonists. I explain the historical and personal context of Woolf’s work and what may have influenced her.
    • Marriage and abduction myths of the ancient Greeks: a means of reinforcing the patriarchy

      Alwang, Camryn (2021-05)
      Greek mythology is filled with stories of abduction and marriage, which played an important role in reinforcing patriarchal societal structures. My Honors thesis will analyze these myths through a feminist lens and examine how they functioned in Greek literature and visual culture. I will be observing how these narratives seem to have acted as guides in a girl’s ritual transition to adulthood and advocated the virtues of an ideal wife by reminding women of their expected place in society. Specifically, I will look at representations of women in Homeric epics and Greek plays as well as focus my visual sources on painted vases, taking into account the context in which these objects would be found. Of particular interest are the narratives of three mythological women. First, Persephone, the daughter of the goddess Demeter who was forcefully abducted by Hades, god of the underworld. Second, Helen, who was abducted by Athenian Hero Theseus as a girl and more famously known as the woman who sparked the Trojan War. Third, Thetis, a Nereid prophesied to give birth to a child greater than their father and thus forced to marry a mortal. In addition, I will examine myths about women like the Amazons who refused to conform to expectations set upon them and form cautionary tales for Greek women.