• How film and literature influence the ways in which East Asian American identity is formed

      Macci, Allyson (2018-05)
      This paper looks at the ways in which East Asian Americans sense of identity is formed through the representations of them and their culture in American film and literature. I will discuss through an analysis of rhetoric, theory, and criticism by East Asian authors, how the portrayal of a culture and people impact and influence their sense of identity. For example, I will answer questions such as what does it mean to be both Asian and American, especially when growing up in a Western society and culture? How does the portrayal of East Asians in popular American film and literature mold and shape their understanding of their sense of self? What are some East Asians stereotyped? How do these stereotypes fit into the ideas that popular Western culture perceives? My primary novels are examples of Asian American authors writing about the Asian American experience and how they perceive what it means to be Asian American. The films I chose look at white American directors and producers and how they interpret Asian culture in their films. My primary and secondary research will further examine how film and literature impacts the ways in which Asian Americans view their identity, heritage, and culture. This will be done through an analyses of rhetoric and history, both Asian and American.
    • How technology affects the way we read and write

      Borstelmann, Robyn (2020-01)
      Studies have been conducted regarding the impact that easily accessible technology, including smart phones, tablets, streaming devices, video games, etc, have on the educational, cognitive, and social development of young children. These studies showed that social media and increased screen time in excessive amounts may have negative impacts on a child’s mental health, but that access to this technology, as well as texting, does not hinder a child’s ability to read, write, and process information. These studies showed that young children and adolescents exhibit an increased level of literacy, as well as a new form of literacy known as “text speak.” They also exhibit a high level of understanding when informal writing is appropriate and when it is not, meaning they showed a positive understanding of grammar and syntax when given exams during these experiments.
    • Portrayal of deafness and deaf culture in children's books and juvenile fiction

      Heavey, Allison (2018-05)
      Throughout the course of history, numerous perspectives on deafness and Deaf Culture have been accepted by larger society. Deafness can be defined in a two dimensional way: as a physical condition, categorized by a profound hearing loss, and as a cultural construction, categorized by a Deaf identity. (Baynton, 1998, p. 2). Societies’ views on deafness and Deaf Culture can be analyzed through literature. Literature reflects the cultural norms and beliefs of a society. Literature can also have the power to influence or shape the views and ideals of a society or culture; this concept is especially true for children books, which instill ideas in children starting at a young age. (Duhan, 2015). This paper will explore the evidence of historical trends of deafness and Deaf Culture in literature for children, particularly the period of oralism, when deafness was viewed negatively and deaf people were expected to assimilate to hearing culture, and the more recent period of manualism, that embraces the use of sign language and accepts Deaf Culture. Additionally, this paper will use previous accredited research and the analysis of themes of twenty children books to draw conclusions on messages about deafness and Deaf Culture children are receiving from literature today.
    • Understanding how definitions of identity are established and altered when literary works are translated to film

      Carter-Huffman, Christine (2019-12)
      This paper analyzes the translation of two different stories from their original story in the form of literature to their corresponding adaptation in film. The poem “The Man from Snowy River” translates to film, The Man from Snowy River ; and the novella, Story of Your Life translates to the film, Arrival. Australian identity and human identity, respectively, are altered once translated across the different genres of a poem to film and a novella to film. These genres have intrinsic components specific to each type, which shape how the story is told and perceived. The medium of literature creates an intimate connection between the text and the reader, but the intimacy ranges between poem and novella. A film shifts its storytelling as we now see and hear the story in dramatic ways through a Hollywood style narrative. Parts of each story is lost once translated, but there is information gained when they are compared. Furthermore, the two stories differ in their more specific genres of fiction and science-fiction. By analyzing form, genre, and the components native to each piece of work, there is an understanding of what life was like when each work was created and what values, perspectives, and intentions are important for the author to show to the reader. This paper will show how the audience’s expectations, the details delivered, and the ultimate messages are shaped and altered throughout each piece of work.