• Epigraphic decoration of three time periods: case studies on the connection of written language and visual culture

      Cooke, Sophie (2020-05)
      This paper analyzes the connection of written language and artistic expression, through three case studies on epigraphy. Written language is secondary to spoken word and has been given various forms, even within the same culture. I aim to addresss the significance of written language in the cultural purpose of an object. Through three case studies I will analyze the way in which the artists are conveying a message to the viewer through written language. First is pectoral necklaces of Ancient Egypt, which are artistically produced and communicate a sentence in hieroglyphs. Second is the study of Greek funerary epigraphic decoration on tombstones which utilize first person narrative. First is pectoral necklaces of Ancient Egypt, which are artistically produced and communicate a sentence in hieroglyphs. First is the use of Pseudo-Arabic in the Italia Renaissance, particularly in paintings of religious subjects. Three very different cultures all carefully using language to convey political power, autonomy in death, and cultural literacy / connections to early Christianity, respectively. I will back up these connections with specific artistic objects, paying close attention to their purpose and cultural origins. I will convey the importance of the analysis of written language in an art historical sense, and its significance in the analysis of visual art.
    • The language of now: an exploration of language change during the COVID-19 pandemic

      Aviles, Sage (2022-05)
      This study is an investigation into language change during the pandemic. It includes language samples from in-person interviews, which span across a seventy-year age range, an academic article, news articles, social media posts, music, and a Netflix special. Google trends, refined to the United States, was referenced to see when new terminology emerged to trace change correlated to the pandemic. This research proves the thesis that language had undoubtedly changed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and new terminology has emerged, and will also continue to evolve following it.