• ‘God Never Talks': alternative interpretations of the rhetoric used in William Friedkin and William Peter Blatty’s The Exorcist

      O’Keefe, David (2021-05)
      Competing explanations have been brought forward regarding the rhetorical implications of the 1973 horror film, The Exorcist. This paper aims to argue against those which insist that the film is meant to be viewed as endorsing a solely theistic interpretation. An opposing argument as such alienates and disregards a number of credible explanations and integral pieces of evidence, from both outside sources and the film itself. Therefore, this paper will utilize several of such sources, which include, but are not limited to film analyses and reviews, rhetorical analyses, and comparative writings with other works in the field. Ultimately, this paper will compare its own explanations and arguments with opposing ones, with the goal of illustrating that The Exorcist’s rhetoric is far more ambiguous and secular than many interpret it to be.
    • Growing Rhythm

      Hummer, Alyson (2019-12)
      The ethnographic film Growing Rhythm depicts the Burmese master percussionist, Kyaw Kyaw Naing, leading students, faculty, and community members of SUNY New Paltz in the first Hsaing ensemble in the United States. This ensemble provided an environment in which to learn the musical traditions of another culture while examining and challenging the norms which Western musicians have accepted. The students of Naing learned the music using the traditional instruments of the Hsaing ensemble: chauk lon bat, kyi-waing, maung-hsaing, si do, hne, sandaya, pat-waing, si and wa, and lin quin. The rehearsal technique and experience developed into a community with a shared mission to spread this music and educate the public.
    • How film and literature influence the ways in which East Asian American identity is formed

      Macci, Allyson (2018-05)
      This paper looks at the ways in which East Asian Americans sense of identity is formed through the representations of them and their culture in American film and literature. I will discuss through an analysis of rhetoric, theory, and criticism by East Asian authors, how the portrayal of a culture and people impact and influence their sense of identity. For example, I will answer questions such as what does it mean to be both Asian and American, especially when growing up in a Western society and culture? How does the portrayal of East Asians in popular American film and literature mold and shape their understanding of their sense of self? What are some East Asians stereotyped? How do these stereotypes fit into the ideas that popular Western culture perceives? My primary novels are examples of Asian American authors writing about the Asian American experience and how they perceive what it means to be Asian American. The films I chose look at white American directors and producers and how they interpret Asian culture in their films. My primary and secondary research will further examine how film and literature impacts the ways in which Asian Americans view their identity, heritage, and culture. This will be done through an analyses of rhetoric and history, both Asian and American.
    • Understanding how definitions of identity are established and altered when literary works are translated to film

      Carter-Huffman, Christine (2019-12)
      This paper analyzes the translation of two different stories from their original story in the form of literature to their corresponding adaptation in film. The poem “The Man from Snowy River” translates to film, The Man from Snowy River ; and the novella, Story of Your Life translates to the film, Arrival. Australian identity and human identity, respectively, are altered once translated across the different genres of a poem to film and a novella to film. These genres have intrinsic components specific to each type, which shape how the story is told and perceived. The medium of literature creates an intimate connection between the text and the reader, but the intimacy ranges between poem and novella. A film shifts its storytelling as we now see and hear the story in dramatic ways through a Hollywood style narrative. Parts of each story is lost once translated, but there is information gained when they are compared. Furthermore, the two stories differ in their more specific genres of fiction and science-fiction. By analyzing form, genre, and the components native to each piece of work, there is an understanding of what life was like when each work was created and what values, perspectives, and intentions are important for the author to show to the reader. This paper will show how the audience’s expectations, the details delivered, and the ultimate messages are shaped and altered throughout each piece of work.
    • The women who produce the media: a podcast series

      Gross, Maxine K. (2019-05)
      In 2018, only 26% of the top 250 grossing films were produced by women. Still, there are statistically more women working as producers in the film industry than any other Above-the-Line position. Through a three part podcast series that includes interviews with six women working as Line Producers, Production Supervisors, and Executive Producers and a paper, The Women Who Produce the Media: A Podcast Series sheds light on the current state of the film industry in the wake of the #MeToo movement from the perspectives of women working in it. Organized through the lense of the past, present, and future of women in film. The Women Who Produce the Media: A Podcast series explores the intersection of the film industry and current women’s issues, along with setting out a solution for how to expand diversity among the film industry.