• Manic? : a play in two acts

      Rausch, Zachary (2017-12)
      This thesis is about the power of story. All medical systems throughout the world are based upon specific stories which they believe about the nature of human existence. Oftentimes, it is easy to lose ourselves in the narratives we know, claiming them to be ultimately true. I will explore and compare two distinct medical narratives, Western and Tibetan Buddhist psychiatry, in order to explore deeper questions about the nature of human suffering. I will take you on this exploration through my own personal narrative as I straddled these two worlds to find grounding and purpose in life. We will explore how these traditions conceptualize mental illness, personal identity, human nature, purpose, and health. We will explore their underlying assumptions and values that are often unquestioned. When we speak of medical narratives, we cannot separate them from our lived experiences. These narratives are not static, do not exist in a vacuum, and may be experienced differently by one person to the next. Therefore, I am only expressing one perspective of infinite. But these are the stories I know and these are the stories that I can genuinely share. I have a fundamental understanding by studying and analyzing the primary texts of the two psychiatric systems: The Fifth Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the rGyud Bzhi . I also have a basic understanding of Tibetan Buddhist psychiatry through four months of study in Bodh Gaya and Darjeeling, India and four months of research of Western psychiatric and psychological history and thought.
    • Weak State caused long duration of insurgency between 1995 to 2016

      Abukosi, Vincent (2017-12)
      Saddam Hussein’s government and the Taliban regime were both toppled in the early months of U.S. invasion. Nevertheless, the U.S. and coalitions’ supported government in both Iraq and Afghanistan have been battling insurgencies since the U.S. invasion. To be exact, the U.S. has been conducting counterinsurgency campaigns in Afghanistan since 2002, and in Iraq since 2003. Why would such operations last so long despite U.S. military might? Many scholars have argued differently on the causes of long duration insurgencies but none has given an argument that can explain all cases of prolonged insurgencies. In this paper, I used the theory of political opportunity structure which posits that “repertoires for protest have traditionally been seen as influenced by political opportunity structure, consisting of both a formal, institutional aspect and an informal, cultural one (Porta 2008, 223)” to argue that weak states caused long duration insurgency between the years of 1995 to 2016. My argument gives another alternative argument that can explain the causes of long duration insurgencies. Using 66 cases of insurgency, from the Global Terrorism dataset, I showed that state weakness caused long duration insurgency between the periods of 1995 to 2016, but the only indicators of state weakness that are statistically significant to the duration of insurgency are security effectiveness score and security legitimacy score. Therefore, my policy recommendation is that for states to carry on successful Counterinsurgency campaigns they need to focus on improving the capability of their security forces, and seek public approval of their security apparatus .
    • Three sides to a story: different perspectives toward the deaf community

      Quinlan, Jada (2017-12)
      When looking into Deafness the medical perspective and the perspective of those in the Deaf community are taken into account. However there is also a societal aspect to Deafness that should be taken into account. This study considers the aspects and perspectives of the hearing, medical, and Deaf communities that determine the views of Deaf people. The study will also compare the Deaf community of the United States to that of Ethiopia. In conclusion, it may be shown how the different perspectives may effect the way the Deaf community is viewed.
    • Neuroplasticity: the impact of age and injury

      Celentano, Alexis M. (2017-12)
      Background: Neuroplasticity is an ongoing process of the brain that allows for learning, changing, and adapting to every day changes as well as to trauma. As we age, the rate of neuroplasticity (that combats the ramifications of brain injury) starts to decline. This has been seen throughout many different species and is the justification for why adult systems have more devastating deficits from injury than children. The brain can spontaneously recover from injury but for improved long-term results, speech and language therapy in conjunction with spontaneous recovery is ideal for maximal recovery of function and language. Purpose: In this review, the primary goal is to discuss past and present research on neuroplasticity, neural aging and the effects of injury on the language centers of the brain. Results: I have discussed neuroplasticity and peak neuroplasticity in children known as the critical periods and sensitive periods, discussion of normal aging on neuroplasticity, the results of prenatal strokes in comparison to the results of adult strokes, and the different types of recovery that occurs post-stroke/traumatic brain injury (TBI).
    • English literacy in deaf education

      Ackerman, Celina (2018-01)
      The purpose of this paper is to discuss the factors influencing the English literacy development of signing deaf children. The literacy rates of deaf high school graduates have been consistently reported as equivalent to that of an average 3rd or 4th grade hearing child (Mayer, 2009, p. 326). The factors contributing to this gap in literacy rates revolve around language acquisition and development. Issues in first language access, exposure and quality as well as differences in deaf and hearing language development are discussed. Theories of bimodal language and literacy development show unique qualities of ASL-English bilingual-bimodal that may begin to explain the cause of difficulty in English literacy skills among signing deaf children in the academic setting. Further research much be conducted in order to further develop educational programs for literacy development that are effective for deaf students.
    • Far too radical, then and now: an examination of women’s body autonomy through the work of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Margaret Sanger

      Mercer, Scout (2018-05)
      In this paper, I plan on showing the extraordinary and radical lives to two progressive feminists, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Margaret Sanger, and how their platforms for women’s body autonomy are still valuable and necessary as women’s bodies are continuously dragged into politics. This paper will explore just how politicized women’s rights to their own bodies has been, through the necessity of combating legal and social codes targeting women. I plan on comparing Stanton and Sanger, in their lives and activism, to see what aspects of their work made them valuable for the women’s rights movement. I will also bring the history of women’s reproductive rights into the present, and how similar Stanton and Sanger’s arguments for autonomy to the modern political climate concerning women’s autonomy.
    • A novel experience: how writing my own novel prepared me for a job in publishing

      Mason, Amber (2018-05)
      In order to understand the editing process more intimately, I decided to write a speculative/dystopian novel under the guidance of Professor Carr, whose extensive experience in the publishing industry makes him the perfect mentor for this project. We moved through every stage of the writing process from idea conception to outlining to chapter drafting. During individual meetings, we discussed how to edit the piece; I paid special attention to the kinds of feedbacks and suggestions that an editor needs to be equipped to give. In the end, I will understand the process of getting a book published from both sides of the equation—the writer and the editor.
    • Portrayal of deafness and deaf culture in children's books and juvenile fiction

      Heavey, Allison (2018-05)
      Throughout the course of history, numerous perspectives on deafness and Deaf Culture have been accepted by larger society. Deafness can be defined in a two dimensional way: as a physical condition, categorized by a profound hearing loss, and as a cultural construction, categorized by a Deaf identity. (Baynton, 1998, p. 2). Societies’ views on deafness and Deaf Culture can be analyzed through literature. Literature reflects the cultural norms and beliefs of a society. Literature can also have the power to influence or shape the views and ideals of a society or culture; this concept is especially true for children books, which instill ideas in children starting at a young age. (Duhan, 2015). This paper will explore the evidence of historical trends of deafness and Deaf Culture in literature for children, particularly the period of oralism, when deafness was viewed negatively and deaf people were expected to assimilate to hearing culture, and the more recent period of manualism, that embraces the use of sign language and accepts Deaf Culture. Additionally, this paper will use previous accredited research and the analysis of themes of twenty children books to draw conclusions on messages about deafness and Deaf Culture children are receiving from literature today.
    • The origins of spoken language

      Terwilliger, Megan (2018-05)
      Research regarding the origins of spoken language is extremely broad and considers many different topics in academia. These topics include: biology and anthropology, as well as anatomy, non-linguistic neurological foundations, potential protolanguages, and possible selective pressures that could have produced such a complex system of communication. Considering these topics can assist in imagining what language may have presented itself as throughout human ancestry, and how it could have developed into the intricate system of modern language. Anatomically, the descent of the larynx, increased thoracic innervation, disappearance of the laryngeal air sacs, and changes in neuroanatomical structures could have served as exaptations or adaptations for spoken language. Non-linguistic factors such as vocal learning and vocal imitation fostered new ways of learning to communicate. Protolanguages could have taken a gestural, musical, hybrid, or lexical form that increased the selective pressures to create today’s language system. Social changes, mainly increase in group size, had the potential to provide great selective pressure for the development of more efficient communication. The combination of some of these factors eventually fostered an environment for the human vocal communication system to evolve into what it is today.
    • Creating a model of integrated restorative justice and treatment for juvenile sex offenders

      Quinn, Caitlin (2018-05)
      The current United States criminal justice system uses a strictly punitive approach in handling cases of sex offenses committed by juveniles. This paper addresses the failures of the current system and analyzes the positive and negative aspects of three alternative models: restorative justice, multisystemic therapy, and the Good Lives Model. Drawing on sociological, criminological, and feminist literature, crime databases, and interviews with professionals in the fields of restorative and juvenile justice, it is shown that no single model meets the needs of stakeholders in juvenile sex offense cases. Instead, I will propose an integrated holistic model of restorative justice and multifaceted treatment that utilizes the most effective aspects of existing alternative models and adds program components related to sexuality and consent would be most beneficial for use with juvenile sex offenders.
    • The latest fashion trend: water sustainability and social ethics

      Mahoney, Musa (2018-05)
      This thesis seeks to present the current state of the fast fashion industry, focusing on water and social ethics to discuss the various health effects and environmental implications stimulated by global fashion trade, while proposing valuable solutions for both consumers and producers. The research breaks down only some of the industry’s main inputs by material selection and hazardous chemical usage found in clothing purchased by consumers. The paper can be further embellished with more recent industrial shifts, as the current market is experiencing drastic changes. It is with tremendous hope that much of this research is to become history, as creative solutions continue to surface upon the world epidemic that is fast fashion. To better answer the questions of the heavy implications brought out by the fashion trade, individual and holistic viewpoints on sustainable development have been used, supported by natural resource depletion levels (which clearly depict the capacity of our ecosystems) to discuss the future of fashion. Businesses and governments must meet with the ultimate goal of implementing conscious consumerism and improving the quality of human life. Looking good and feeling good should not be mutually exclusive from doing good.
    • The inadequacies of the Psychopath Checklist Revised (PCL-R)

      Horowitz, Eli (2018-05)
      I propose that the current criteria for diagnosing Psychopathy, the Psychopath Checklist Revised (PCL-R), is biased towards criminal and antisocial tendencies. While it may be an accurate screening method and means of predicting recidivism in antisocial Psychopaths, it does not shed light on the countless other individuals who may be thought of as “prosocial” psychopaths. There may very well be many individuals who satisfy much of the existing criteria for psychopathy and exhibit the neuro-morphology typical in antisocial psychopaths, but do not exhibit antisocial behavior and thus would not be tested, nor receive a score on the PCL-R that would classify them as a psychopath. I will examine the methods present in identifying psychopaths today and propose the idea that amongst us are many more.
    • Engagement levels on social media: a case study of Sojourner Truth Library’s Instagram

      Maiorano, Julianna (2018-05)
      Recently, libraries have begun utilizing social media to market their materials and services to the general public. Identifying best practices that lead to increased engagement between followers and library social media accounts can assist libraries to welcome more patrons. This study sought to identify what libraries can do to increase the amount of engagement with followers. This research explores the amount of engagement on Sojourner Truth Library’s social media. Amount of engagement was determined by the number of likes and comments per post. Using data compiled from the library’s social media, the relationship between amount of engagement and the content of posted photos was examined. Findings suggest that featuring human faces on Instagram affects the amount of engagement positively. Overall, it was found that featuring human faces in a social media post will increase engagement levels.
    • Animal protagonists in children’s literature

      Zito, Jessica (2018-05)
      Animal protagonists, although a rare sight in adult novels, have been a staple in the childhood literary canon for centuries. A majority of the all-time bestselling books for children in both early and middle childhood contain animal characters, with a large percentage containing at least one animal protagonist. This paper seeks to examine two research questions: 1) Why do authors prefer animal protagonists to human protagonists if the desired emotional connection is a human one? 2) What is the purpose of placing childhood themes in an animalized literary context? The paper provides a close reading of many popular children’s texts, such as The Very Hungry Caterpillar, They All Saw a Cat, Charlotte’s Web, The Pokey Little Puppy, Black Beauty, If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, and El Deafo, among many others. Books were chosen for analysis based on their embodiment of popular literary themes, as well as their general popularity, sales, and awards won. An effort was made to include popular books written during different time periods. The paper includes supporting research from published books, literary criticisms, websites, journal articles, and newspaper articles. Keywords: English, education, childhood education, early childhood education, animal protagonists, children’s literature, children’s books, animal stories, The Very Hungry Caterpillar, The Story of Babar: The Little Elephant, They All Saw a Cat, The True Story of the Three Little Pigs, Frog and Toad Are Friends, Winnie-the-Pooh, Charlotte’s Web, Make Way for Ducklings, The Pokey Little Puppy, The Tale of Peter Rabbit, Black Beauty, The Rainbow Fish, The Berenstain Bears’ New Baby, If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus, El Deafo, Arthur’s Nose
    • The effect of poverty on child education (K-12) in public schools: what schools and the government can do to help student achievement

      Hunter, Hydia (2018-05)
      According to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR, 1948), everyone has the right to pursue an education which includes children. Whether or not everyone is receiving a quality education is debatable. There are a few different school systems, such as public, charter, private, catholic, gender strict schools, magnet and even homeschooling. Children are considered to be the most vulnerable population, especially in the United States (Azzi- Lessing, 2017). When it comes to the child welfare system in the United States, the needs of children are not adequately being met. Azzi- Lessing (2017) states that the United States biggest downfall is the government’s lack of concern for poor families. The lack of intervention contributes to trauma and the deprivation of the needs and well-being of children (Azzi-Lessing, 2017). Additionally, this includes the quality of education children in public schools receive, more specifically those living in poverty...In the United States, it is considered neglect if parents or guardians keep their children from attending school. Even if parents send their children to school, children living in poverty are more likely not attending schools that are adequately educating and providing their students with the tools needed for success. A good quality of education is not always something that is seen a right and in some cases a financial burden. What is the point of children attending school if the education is not engaging and allowing students to reach their full potential? There are many families in the world that are affected by poverty but 2.2 billion children worldwide are currently living in poverty (McKinney, 2014). One of the factors that definitely affects the quality of education a child receives is poverty. There is a clear educational achievement gap between those living in poverty compared to those children not living in poverty.
    • The keeper of the belt: exploring objects, family, and the Russian diaspora

      Kohn, Carina (2018-05)
      My project consists of a collection of short stories which explore material culture through the lens of the Russian diaspora. Each piece gives voice to Russian immigrants who have experienced what it feels like to uproot one’s entire life and leave almost everything behind. My focus is on the items they have held on to. In preparation to tell these stories, I have examined historical texts and memoirs discussing the cultural and political structures of the Soviet Union. I have also interviewed Russian family members and friends—many of whom are represented as protagonists in their respective stories. Throughout my first of set interviews, it became evident that these individuals were deeply attached to the items they presented, and were able to tap into a reservoir of memories associated with them. I have my own set of Russian objects, which have been passed down to me by my mother, and this project has helped me pay attention to them in new ways. It has also given me the opportunity to contextualize my mother’s immigration and view it as a part of a larger experience. I am currently in the process of adding to my pool of interviews. With every story that I write, I gain a deeper understanding of what it means to have a relationship to places where you live, and the people who you love. If a photograph is known to speak a thousand words, then how many can a preserved candy wrapper say, or a loved one’s wallet?
    • An injection of truth: an exploration of public health inequalities concerning vaccinations during outbreaks

      Scarimbolo, Laura (2018-05)
      The inequalities in vaccine uptake can lead to outbreaks that further exploit the differences in health. Public health initiatives in the United States attempt to provide better vaccination coverage and awareness in response, but fail to reflect all inequalities. Public health inequalities are brought about as a result of various policies, differing socioeconomic status, and location. These inequalities affect populations in their own unique ways based on the interaction of their confounding lifestyle factors such as age, class, and accessibility to health sources.
    • The benefits of summer camps for youth at risk: a circle of courage framework

      Klee, Allison (2018-05)
      In our ever-growing and fast-paced world, there are fewer and fewer spaces where children are afforded the opportunities to simply play. Schools and other child-centered spaces where children are supposed to be able to engage in self-exploration and creativity are becoming more and more catered to adults (Ginsburg, 2007). Although all children are suffering the consequences, youth at risk suffer at a disproportionate level (Brendtro, Brokenleg, & Van Bockern et al. 2002)... Summer camp is often defined as more than a place where children can go for a certain amount of time, and more so as an intentional community where children obtain skills and benefits in their cognitive, behavioral, physical, social, and emotional development (Povilaitis & Klee 4 Tamminen, 2017). Focusing on youth at risk is especially important in measuring the positive aspects of summer camp as this population faces greater difficulties than youth not at risk. Brendtro et al. 2002 intentionally use the term “youth at risk” to remove blame and shame rhetoric when referring to youth who are impacted by environmental hazards including poverty, substance abuse, and violence. This way, the focus is on their environment and shifts the focus from blaming the individual, to encouraging consideration of the greater social ailments youth may be facing...The Circle of Courage defines belonging, independence, mastery, and generosity as four areas to help youth develop their strengths and identify needs (Brendtro et al. 2002). Through the employment of these quadrants, the Circle of Courage can be used as a tool to identify destructive relationships, climates of futility, learned irresponsibility, and the loss of purpose as factors that prohibit youth from developing strengths in the four areas (Brendtro et al. 2002). This particular framework based on Native American philosophy provides a powerful alternative in the approach to education and youth development, placing youth at risk at the forefront of care.
    • Nudes: recontextualizing the female nude in contemporary art

      Monsour, Leah (2018-05)
      In this paper I will discuss my photographic project titled “Nudes”; the research that lead to its conception, and the process in its various iterations. This project is a visual response to the male gaze. How we are trained to see, and who is allowed to be in control of this, has a direct impact on the images that are made. When the dominant lens we are trained to see through stems from patriarchal values, the power dynamic inherent in patriarchy is amplified. Photographs are seen as truth, and have the ability to reinforce or subvert already existing cultural beliefs. It is in confronting the gaze, subverting it, inserting new narratives, that we are able to challenge this cycle. My project aims to do this.
    • Why sustainable business is better

      Santa Maria, Nicole (2018-05)
      With growing concerns and numerous sources of data confirming climate change we must look toward a future in sustainable practices. While individual people can do their part in reducing their personal carbon footprint it is clear that the ones who truly need to change are corporations. Big businesses are the largest contributors to the negative effects of greenhouse gases. With this in mind it is only a matter of time until the people demand change. This change does not need to be delayed, if companies can become leaders in sustainable business reforms and practices, not only will we find better results, for our planet but they may even find better results in their profits. To demonstrate the positive results, of what may be seen as relatively “small” changes, we will analyze the implementations and the implications of the State University of New York at New Paltz “Green Revolving Fund.” This will be accomplished through an understanding of past projects and my own proposal for the current University community. This paper will also touch on much larger business decisions through reimagining and redefining industry standards. While we will also explore the limitations of these processes; any company can take steps towards a better, more sustainable, business.